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Pinellas County Schools Talent Identification Program

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Presentation on theme: "Pinellas County Schools Talent Identification Program"— Presentation transcript:

1 Pinellas County Schools Talent Identification Program
Parent Meeting Saturday, March 11, 2017

2 What do you need to know about the college admission process?
Planning for College What do you need to know about the college admission process?

3 Planning for College Starts NOW!!! Key points for 8th Grade
Course selection: Courses taken in 8th grade will determine what programs students are eligible for in the 9th grade Students who wish to participate in honors and AP course opportunities in the 9th grade should ensure they have advanced core academic courses and/or high school courses in 8th grade High school courses taken in 8th grade DO count in students’ high school grade point averages (GPAs) and in their class rankings

4 District Resources Available
How can parents and students learn about programs available in high school? Pinellas Pathways to Graduation CTE Matrix (Career Technical Education Program) District Application Programs ACCESS THESE RESOURCES AT: Click on Departments tab Click on Teaching and Learning (in departments) Click on Middle School (right navigation bar)

5 Pinellas Pathways to Graduation for High School Planning

6 Pinellas Pathways to Graduation
Why? Helps prepare students to earn Florida’s Standard High School Diploma Allows students to choose a course of study that best fits their college and/or career plans Recommends a pathway of courses to take but students are not locked in Can make changes/updates to customize to your needs

7 Information about Pathways
Advanced Scholar Pathway Includes a rigorous level of required and elective courses that best prepare students seeking admittance to competitive four-year universities College Pathway Includes a rigorous level of required and elective courses that best prepare students for entry into a college or four year university Technical/College Pathway Offers the opportunity for students to challenge themselves in specific academic and elective areas of interest, earn nationally recognized industry certifications, and pursue entry into a post-secondary technical school or state college

8 Career Technical Education: High School Programs
Please refer to the handouts for specific information on our CTE High School Programs The chart on the left represents all of the CTE programs in grades 6 – 12, including career academies, Centers Of Excellence and magnets.  This will help students and parents see what CTE programs their schools offers and provides options for attending a CTE program of which they have interest. The chart to the right lists all industry certifications achieved by PCS students during the 2012 – 13 school year and the articulated credit available if they choose to attend a state college – like SPC.  Aligned with the certification is an example of the career path and average salary. Important to note that industry certifications that are “Gold Standard” come with a statewide articulation agreement providing college credit for specified degree paths.  This means a savings in tuition for achieving the industry certification.

9 High School Magnet Programs Guide
As in the past few years, the application program cycle will begin with Discovery Nights and Information Fairs next November. The application cycle will most likely occur in early January again. Now is the time to be thinking about what programs you want to consider for high school so that your son/daughter takes the appropriate prerequisite courses in 8th grade. Wide variety of programs geared toward advanced academics and/or specific career choices.

10 Simplify the College Planning Process
Understand the admissions factors Learn about the SAT® and SAT Subject Tests ™ Explore college options Develop a financial plan

11 Understand Admissions Factors
Primary Factors Quality/Rigor of Academic Courses Academic Performance Test Scores (SAT, ACT, AP, AICE, IB, etc.) Additional Factors Extracurricular Activities Essay(s) Letters of Recommendation Demonstrated Interest Geography These factors are broken down into two categories: primary and additional. In general, primary factors will carry more weight in the admission process. There is no one formula that colleges use to admit students. Although grades and test scores are important, it’s a combination of these factors that colleges consider to get the best picture of who a student is and how he or she will fit in at their institution. Understand Admission Factors

12 Grades and Coursework This is one of the most important factors for admission to college! Colleges will consider Course selection – rigorous Grades – balance volume of rigor for success GPA Trends A Rigorous Curriculum includes, at minimum: Four years of English language arts Four years of mathematics, including one or more years of study beyond Algebra II Three or more years of history/the social sciences Two or more years of the same world language Course Selection: Be mindful of what kinds of courses are required for graduation and to get into the college of your choice. Ask for help in developing the best four year plan. Take a balanced course load. Although you should challenge yourself, you don’t want to take on more than you can handle and risk not doing well in those courses. At the same time, you should not take all easy classes just to increase your GPA. If you need advice on how to pick classes, ask your counselor. Grades: Do well throughout high school. Do not give in to senioritis. Good grades may enable you to qualify for certain scholarships. Check online or with your counselor for information on scholarship requirements. Class Rank: Not all high schools maintain a class ranking. For those that do, colleges are looking to see how you measure up against your peers. A high rank doesn’t necessarily guarantee admission to certain colleges. Many exclusive colleges are choosing from among many high-ranked individuals. No matter where you rank, there is a college for you. Trends: Colleges consider grade trends. Upward trends can help a lot, but downward trends can raise questions. If a student is experiencing an overall downward trend, often a counselor recommendation or special letter can address these issues, especially if there are other circumstances the college should know about. No one plans for downward trends. Be sure to seek support if there is a downward trend.

13 Other considerations Positive recommendations from educators/mentors
Personal statement/essay that demonstrates writing ability and self expression Demonstrated interest in the college Extracurricular activities – commitment to a sport, performing/visual art, club, volunteering, etc. Community involvement, part-time work, internship Interview (if applicable) Recommendations: Be sure to read applications to understand their criteria; some want at least one academic recommendation, some want at least one nonacademic recommendation. On the application form, waive your right to view recommendation letters. This gives more credibility to the recommendations in the eyes of the college. Personal Statements/Essays: Personal statements and essays are both a measure of writing ability and a window into each student’s background. Although it’s a good idea to show your essay to a few people for their feedback, remember that this is your chance to shine and show colleges how you express yourself. In addition to the personal statement/essay, most applications (including the Common Application) have short-answer questions. Use these questions to give additional information about yourself beyond the facts. Demonstrated Interest: Colleges like to know that you really want to go to their school, not that they’re an afterthought or backup. Make every effort to show your enthusiasm. Consider early admission/decision. Visit the campus. Participate in an optional interview. Send SAT scores. Extracurricular Activities: MAINTAIN A FILE of these activities starting with your freshmen year so that you don’t miss anything when you do your application. You don’t need to do a little bit of everything. Instead, try to focus on a few of your interests or passions, and then get involved in activities where you can explore them. This could be the school paper, yearbook, or sports or other school-related activities. Also, don’t be afraid to look outside of school for opportunities: Ask your family and friends about ways to volunteer, intern and/or work in the fields in which you’re interested. Colleges want to see: Long-term involvement in these activities Activities that are related to a major or career goal Activities that demonstrate leadership skills and ability

14 Learn about the SAT® Three areas tested focus on skills that matter most for college readiness and success based on current research Total Length – 3 hours (plus 50 minutes for essay) Reading – 65 minutes, 52 questions Writing and Language – 35 minutes, 44 questions Mathematics – 80 minutes (55 w/ calculator, 25 w/o), 58 questions Optional Essay Although high school grades are a very useful indicator of how students will perform in college, there is great variation in grading standards and course rigor within and across high schools. SAT is one way for colleges to compare students across schools, districts, states and countries. A combination of SAT scores and grades is the best predictor of success in college. Educators trust the SAT as a useful part of the college application process because the SAT is: The most widely used standardized admission test The standard in reliability and validity An internationally recognized, accurate measure of college readiness and scholarship potential Skills tested on new SAT means students do not need to memorize extraneous vocabulary words like we did when we took this test. Also, the penalty for wrong answers no longer exists so students should make educated guesses when they are not certain of an answer.

15 Learn about the SAT® Score Reporting Provides Specific Feedback to Allow for Growth 1 Total Score (ERW & Math combined) 2 Section Scores Evidence-based Reading & Writing (ERW), Mathematics 2 Cross Test Scores 10-40 Analysis in Science, Analysis in History/Social Studies 3 Tests Scores Reading, Writing & Language, Mathematics 7 Subscores 1-15 Words in Context, Command of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, Standard English Conventions, Heart of Algebra, Problem Solving & Data Analysis, Passport to Advanced Mathematics Same Score Reporting format as PSAT 8/9 and PSAT/NMSQT 3 Test Scores in red determine the NMS selection index (add and multiply by 2) All PCS 8th graders take PSAT 8/9; All PCS 9th & 10th graders take PSAT.NMSQT; All 11th graders take SAT in the spring (11th grade PSAT.NMSQT is optional, generates scholarship opportunities and is highly recommended (fee required)) Longitudinal scores allow parent, student, teacher to understand the growth of a student and the needs for additional skill development

16 SAT Suite of Assessments
PSAT 8/9 – Foundation for understanding students’ progress prior as they enter high school; taken by all 8th graders in PCS PSAT/NMSQT – Check-ins for student progress to pinpoint areas for development; taken by all 9th & 10th graders in PCS; optional and recommended for 11th graders SAT – College Entrance Exam Prepare using SATpractice.org at Khan Academy As part of the TIP tutorials, all participating students created SAT Practice accounts on Khan Academy. As part of this process, students took diagnostic exams for Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and for Mathematics in order to have their personalized practice modules prepared for them. Within our middle schools and high schools, students who took PSAT 8/9 and PSAT/NMSQT have connected their assessment results to Khan Academy for personalized SAT Practice. Khan uses the diagnostic and past assessment results to prescribe areas that need to be strengthened and modules of problems to address these areas for the individual student. Two students who score 1080 on the PSAT/NMSQT will have two different plans depending on how they earned their 1080 points or depending on what they had correct.

17

18 Explore College Options
What colleges are right for your child? Consider Size of school Diversity of student body Location Academic programs Campus life – athletics, activities, housing Graduation and retention rates Financial aid and scholarship opportunities WHERE WILL YOUR CHILD BE MOST HAPPY AND SUCCESSFUL IN HIS/HER COLLEGE LIFE? Visit to explore your options Size and Diversity of the Student Body Size will affect many of your opportunities and experiences, including: Range of academic majors offered Extracurricular possibilities Amount of personal attention you’ll receive When considering the student body, be sure to think about factors such as the geographic, ethnic, racial and religious diversity of the student body. Explore what kinds of student organizations, or other groups with ethnic or religious foundations, are active and visible on campus. Location What is important to you? Visit home frequently, or do you see this as a time to experience a new part of the country? Perhaps you like an urban environment with access to museums, ethnic food or well-known sports teams. Maybe you want easy access to the outdoors or the community feel of a small town. Academic Programs If you know what you want to study, research the reputations of academic departments by talking to people in the fields that interest you. If you’re undecided, relax and pick an academically balanced institution that offers a range of majors and programs. Campus Life Consider what your college life will be like beyond the classroom. Aim for a balance between academics, activities and social life. Before choosing a college, learn the answers to these questions: What extracurricular activities, athletics and special interest groups are available? Does the community around the college offer interesting outlets for students? Is there an ethnic or religious group in which to take part? How do fraternities and sororities influence campus life? Is housing guaranteed? How are dorms assigned? Retention and Graduation Rates One of the best ways to measure a school’s quality and the satisfaction of its students is to find out what percentage of students return after their first year and the percentage of students who actually graduate. A college with good retention and graduation rates often indicates that responsible academic, social and financial support systems exist for most students. Financial Aid and Scholarships Today’s college price tag makes cost an important consideration for most students. However, virtually all colleges work to ensure that academically qualified students from every economic circumstance can find financial aid that allows them to attend. BeyondEducation.org This website aims to provide parents and students with postsecondary school information that will help them to make informed education and career choices. It includes information on employment and earnings outcomes of graduates of the State University System, the Florida College System and District Postsecondary Career and Technical Schools as well as other important information.

19 Develop a Financial Plan
College Costs Tuition and fees Room and board Books and supplies Personal expenses (laundry, telephone, etc.) Travel (commuting or visiting home) Calculate your savings to see if you are on track (Florida pre-paid or other savings) Search for Scholarships!!! Visit Raise.Me.org Local Scholarships In general, the smaller the geographical area a scholarship covers, the better your chances of getting one. Begin with your high school guidance office and continue to the college aid section of your public library. Most libraries will have a number of books about financial aid, including scholarship guides such as the College Board’s Scholarship Handbook. They also may have information on local scholarships. Membership Organizations and Employers Explore categories you might not have considered, such as religious, community service, fraternal, military, union and professional. And don’t forget your parents. Many large companies offer scholarships or tuition programs for children of employees. Don’t overlook student jobs. Employers such as fast-food chains, department stores and supermarkets often give scholarships. Free Scholarship Search Service A scholarship search company collects information on hundreds of awards and compares your student characteristics with scholarship restrictions. Based on your answers to a questionnaire, you will receive a list of possible scholarships. Institutional Scholarships Research what kinds of scholarships are available at the schools that interest you. Check out college websites, catalogs and financial aid offices for this information. Eligibility for scholarships can be based on merit, financial need, intended major, ethnicity or a variety of other factors. RaiseMe.org On Raise.me, students can track their high school progress, earn scholarships, and develop a clear path to college.

20 Florida Bright Futures Program
Awarded to every student in the state of Florida who meets the eligibility requirements Requirements include Grade Point Average, Community Service hours, and Test Scores on the ACT or SAT Three levels of awards Academic, Medallion Gold Seal Vocational Review Bright Futures eligibility at the Florida Shines website: https://www.floridashines.org/go-to- college/pay-for-college#

21 Scholarship Information
EVERY family should complete a FAFSA in October of the child’s graduation year in order to maximize financial aid Scholarship information can be found on the PCSB website (www.pcsb.org/financialaid) On the Financial Aid page, you will find links to Scholarship Opportunities Financial Aid Seminars Bright Futures Pinellas Education Foundation Scholarships Scholarship Search Engines, such as FASTWEB

22 Career Cruising Builds a bridge between administrators/counselors, students & parents Students can create and update High School Academic Plans to meet their career goals Students & parents can track their progress toward graduation Links to information on finding the right college/major for your student, career exploration, scholarships and much more! Introduced in 8th grade This is a tool for high school, career and college planning that all students have access to. ​Students will create their 4 year high school plan in 8th grade tied to an interest inventory Students are able to track  progress  toward graduation Students can explore hundreds of careers using a variety of methods. Students also have access to resources to help them prepare for the world of work, including an integrated job search and resume builder Students have access to information about post-secondary institutions across the country… … and information about where to find financial aid to pay for their education! Students also have access to resources to help them prepare for the world of work, including an integrated job search and resume builder. Career Cruising’s Parent Portal provides parents and guardians with access to their child’s My Plan work.

23 College Planning Recap
Remember college opportunities exist for ALL! Simplify the planning process Understand Admissions factors Learn more about the SAT and SAT Subject Tests Students who take SAT with a fee waiver receive four College Application fee waivers directly from the College Board Students who take PSAT/NMSQT can opt in to the college search which sends student info to colleges so that colleges can reach out to the student Explore college options Develop a financial plan Size and Diversity of the Student Body Size will affect many of your opportunities and experiences, including: Range of academic majors offered Extracurricular possibilities Amount of personal attention you’ll receive When considering the student body, be sure to think about factors such as the geographic, ethnic, racial and religious diversity of the student body. Explore what kinds of student organizations, or other groups with ethnic or religious foundations, are active and visible on campus. Location What is important to you? Visit home frequently, or do you see this as a time to experience a new part of the country? Perhaps you like an urban environment with access to museums, ethnic food or well-known sports teams. Maybe you want easy access to the outdoors or the community feel of a small town. Academic Programs If you know what you want to study, research the reputations of academic departments by talking to people in the fields that interest you. If you’re undecided, relax and pick an academically balanced institution that offers a range of majors and programs. Campus Life Consider what your college life will be like beyond the classroom. Aim for a balance between academics, activities and social life. Before choosing a college, learn the answers to these questions: What extracurricular activities, athletics and special interest groups are available? Does the community around the college offer interesting outlets for students? Is there an ethnic or religious group in which to take part? How do fraternities and sororities influence campus life? Is housing guaranteed? How are dorms assigned? Retention and Graduation Rates One of the best ways to measure a school’s quality and the satisfaction of its students is to find out what percentage of students return after their first year and the percentage of students who actually graduate. A college with good retention and graduation rates often indicates that responsible academic, social and financial support systems exist for most students. Financial Aid and Scholarships Today’s college price tag makes cost an important consideration for most students. However, virtually all colleges work to ensure that academically qualified students from every economic circumstance can find financial aid that allows them to attend.

24 SAT Results The College Board will mail your students scores to your homes sometime in May 2017. Once your students scores have been received, we will provide another information session to explain the scores, provide you with next steps, and explain how to take advantage of online resources. Important info note about SAT scores for middle school students (from College Board) on next 2 slides!

25 Important Information for 7th Grade SAT Scores
The scores your student will be receiving will not be permanent unless requested by the student in writing! If a student tests in the 8th grade or below, the scores are purged at the end of the testing year. Students can ask to preserve their scores as part of their permanent record if they choose. To do this, you must submit a request in writing (see next slide)

26 Request in Writing to Keep Scores for 8th graders and below:
Before the end of June of the year in which they tested Including full name, registration number, and test date Addressed to: The College Board SAT Program Attention: Talent Search Scores P.O. Box Miami, FL 33102

27 2017 Pinellas County Schools STEM Honors Summer Camps
When: 8 a.m. to 3:30pm, June 5-8 & June 12-15, 2017 (8 days/Mon.-Thurs.) Where: Lakewood High or East Lake Middle What: Students will engage in science, technology, engineering and mathematic activities such as robotics, multi-media, computer programming and career exploration. Application Fee: $90.00 prior to 4/5/17 $ after 4/5/17 Application Deadline: Wednesday, May 10, 2017

28 2017 Pinellas County Schools STEM Honors Summer Camps
How to enroll: There are 100 seats at each site. Students who wish to enroll may fill out the attached application and send it along with a check made out to Pinellas County Schools for the $ camp fee to: Office of Middle School Education Pinellas County Schools 301 4th Street SW, Largo, FL 33779

29 What questions do you have?


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