Ppt on waves tides and ocean currents map

Challenge the future Delft University of Technology CryoSat+ for Oceans CP4O, Mid Term Review, 25-26 June 2013, NOC, Southampton CP4O: State of the Art.

(Starlab, NOC, CLS, SatOC) Selection of open ocean SAR areas for sea-floor mapping: sites with high-resolution marine gravity information (DTU) 11 CP4O, Mid Term Review, Southampton WP2500 cont’d Selection of coastal ocean SAR areas: sites with wet tropo, iono and regional tidal corrections and in situ data, especially directional wave buoy data, preferably collocated with tide gauges e.g. English Channel, Gulf of Lion/


Oceans S6E3. Students will recognize the significant role of water in earth processes. a. Explain that a large portion of the Earth’s surface is water,

, volcanic eruption, gravity) on geological features including oceans (composition, currents, and tides). How are geological features that exist on land similar to those on the ocean floor? Terms to know: Sonar—sound navigation and ranging; system that uses sound waves to measure distances; has enabled scientists to map much of the ocean floor Continental shelf—gently sloping shallow area of the ocean floor extending outward from the edge of a/


Ocean Systems 3.1 The oceans are a connected system. 3.2

1. Ocean Exploration 2. Mapping the Ocean Floor KEY CONCEPT SUMMARY Ocean water moves in currents. 3.2 Ocean water moves in currents. II. Ocean water moves in currents. ocean current A. The oceans have major currents. upwelling 1. Surface Currents downwelling 2. Deep Currents El Niño B. Currents interact with climate and weather. KEY CONCEPT SUMMARY Waves move through oceans. 3.3 Waves move through oceans. III. Waves move through oceans. longshore current A. Waves form in the open ocean. rip current 1. Wave/


The World’s Oceans 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by ocean water. The oceans contain 97% of the earth’s water. All the oceans and seas are actually.

satellite, the Seasat, launched in 1978 Motions of the Oceans Ocean water never stops moving. The three basic motions of the ocean are : the up and down movement of the waves. The steady movement of ocean currents and the rise and fall of the ocean tides. Waves Waves are pulses of energy that move through the ocean. Waves are set in motion by winds, earthquakes and the gravitational pull of the moon. The most common source/


Chapter 3: Chemical and Physical Features of Water and the World Ocean. Marine Biology Mr. Swift.

Wind Patterns Wind Patterns Surface Currents Surface Currents Thermocline Circulation and the Great Ocean Conveyor Thermocline Circulation and the Great Ocean Conveyor –The Three-Layered Ocean –Stability and Overturn –The Great Ocean Conveyor Waves and Tides Waves and TidesWavesTides Why Are There Tides? Why Are There Tides? Tides in the Real World Tides in the Real World Box Readings: Box Readings: Tall Ships and Surface Currents Tall Ships and Surface Currents Waves That Kill Waves That Kill Eye on/


Oceanography. Oceanography is the scientific study of Earth’s Oceans Oceanographers study: Chemical composition Temperature Movement of ocean water.

Ocean The Challenger-Late 1800’s, British research ship Investigated ocean currents, water temperature, sediments, topography Used nets, dredges and other tools Meteor- German ship in the 1920’s Used sonar, first to map the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Ocean /waves, tides and currents by erosion and deposition Ocean floor is shaped by tectonic processes Erosion Wave Refraction is the bending of a wave when it reaches shallow water This is caused by wave speed and water depth A wave will reach a headland first and /


Chapter: Oceans Table of Contents Section 3: WavesWaves Section 1: Ocean Water Section 2: Ocean Currents and ClimateOcean Currents and Climate Section.

3 As a result, beach sediments are moved sideways. Longshore currents carry many metric tons of loose sediment from one beach to another. Tides Throughout a day, the water level at the ocean’s edge changes. This rise and fall in sea level is called a tide. Waves 3 3 A tide is a giant wave that can be thousands of kilometers long but only 1 m to/


1 Tidal Prediction November 3. 2 Equilibrium Theory Predicts periodicities, but not actual movement of tides Predicts periodicities, but not actual movement.

tide advance) and depth are just right, can set up standing oscillation with tidal period – Resonance Natural Period of bay very close to Semi-diurnal tidal period Natural Period of bay very close to Semi-diurnal tidal period 11 12 13 At ocean basin scale, Earth’s rotation – Coriolis force – deflects tidal currents to the right in the N. hemisphere Affects standing wave/ level for tide gauges and depth measurements – “Chart Datum” Geodetic Datums – fixed reference system used by surveyors, topo maps, etc. /


Ocean Water is constantly in motion, powered by many different forces: Winds, Density differences, etc.

moons. Each month there are two spring tides and two neap tides, each one about one week apart. What is the difference between neap tides and spring tides? How are each formed? Beaches and shorelines are constantly undergoing changes as the force of waves and currents act on them. A beach is the accumulation of sediment found along the shore of a lake or ocean. They are composed of whatever sediment/


Did You Know?  "The Wave" originated as a challenge between The Seattle Sounder fans and The Vancouver Whitecaps fans in 1975 at Memorial stadium in.

", going all around the stadium in the form of the "Wave".  Objective: I will identify the major ocean currents and circulation patterns.  Agenda:  Current Map  Homework:  Study for Tide Quiz Tomorrow Monday, October 26 th Current Map 1.Pick up a world map 2.Turn to page 9-5 figure 9-2 3.Copy and label the currents on your map. Use the map on the next slide to help you identify the cold/


Chapter: Oceans Table of Contents Section 3: WavesWaves Section 1: Ocean Water Section 2: Ocean Currents and ClimateOcean Currents and Climate Section.

3 As a result, beach sediments are moved sideways. Longshore currents carry many metric tons of loose sediment from one beach to another. Tides Throughout a day, the water level at the ocean’s edge changes. This rise and fall in sea level is called a tide. Waves 3 3 A tide is a giant wave that can be thousands of kilometers long but only 1 m to/


Ocean Systems CHAPTER the BIG idea The oceans are a connected system of water in motion. The oceans are a connected system. Ocean water moves in currents.

KEY CONCEPT SUMMARY KEY CONCEPT SUMMARY Waves move through oceans. B. Waves cause currents near shore. rip current longshore current 10.3 CHAPTER RESOURCES CHAPTER RESOURCES VOCABULARY KEY CONCEPT CHAPTER HOME IV. Waters rise and fall in tides. A. Coastal waters rise and fall each day. B. The gravity of the Moon and the Sun causes tides. 1. Daily Tides 2. Monthly Tides Waters rise and fall in tides. C. Tides can be used to generate/


Oceanography- 8th Grade Second Trimester Unit One: Oceanography A Standards 3.5.4.D and 3.5.7.D.

float in the water and are carried by waves and currents. 1. Phytoplankton – plant plankton, i.e., diatoms. 2. Zooplankton – animal-like plankton, i.e., protists, crustaceans. B. Nekton – free swimming life forms, i.e., larger fish, squid, sea turtles, whales. C. Benthos – bottom dwellers, both mobile and stationary, i.e. crabs, coral. X. Ocean Zones A. Neritic Zone – extends from the low tide line out to/


FRESH and SALTWATER SYSTEMS ‘blue planet’ Our ‘blue planet’ - as viewed from space - is unique among the planets in our solar system, because 74% of its.

the shoreline dramatically.Tsunami harbour wave When an earthquake occurs on the ocean floor, a huge damaging wave can be created. These waves are called tsunamis (which means ‘harbour wave’). WATER - Waves Tides The water level along the coast of continents changes constantly. This water level is tide called a tide. Tides are the regular rising and falling of very large bodies of water. High tide High tide is the highest level the/


The Ocean Floor and Margins Chapter 14 The vast world ocean Earth is often referred to as the blue planet  Seventy-one percent of Earth’s surface is.

response to density differences (density currents) Temperature – cold water is denser Salinity – density increases with increasing salinity Layering in the ocean Copyright N.W. Driscoll, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Thermohaline Oceanic Circulation Idealized “conveyor belt”model of ocean circulation Cold, higher salinity Warm, lower salinity Demos Home page Waves On The Beach As the wave travels in shallower water it slows and eventually falls forward as a/


LESSON ONE A/S outline + Where is the natural environment, what is it like, what natural features (landforms) are there and where are they located (distribution)?

Point, a headland, juts out into the sea, the wave breaks directly on the headland at high tide. Wave Types TIDES Are daily changes in sea levels Tides rise (FLOOD) to produce a HIGH TIDE And fall (EBB) (LOW TIDE) Produced by the gravitational pull that the Sun and Moon exert on the Earth’s surface and the oceans on 1 side and the other side bulges out because of inertia there/


Exploring the Oceans Chapter C4. Wind and Waves (C94)  Most of the movement of water on the ocean’s surface is due to _________, which is the up-and-down.

apparatus)  They travel in small, underwater vehicles called _________  _________ are used to study ocean currents from space and sonar, a device that uses _________ waves, is used to map the ocean floor Submersibles (C110-111)  One of the best-known submersibles is ________ and by the _____’s it was exploring the oceans  In 1977 scientists in Alvin discovered underwater vents along the _____-________ Ridge  In/


Physical Oceanography. I. The Oceans Objectives Identify methods used by scientists to study Earth ’ s oceans. Discuss the origin and composition of the.

– breaker Objectives Describe the physical properties of waves. Explain how tides form. Compare and contrast various ocean currents. Vocabulary Ocean Movements – tide – density current – surface current – upwelling Ocean Movements A wave is a rhythmic movement that carries energy through space or matter, such as ocean water. Ocean Movements As an ocean wave passes, the water moves up and down in a circular pattern and returns to its original position. Wave Characteristics A crest is the highest point of/


Coastal Processes.

. They occupy similar positions on the western side of the continents between 45 and 65 degrees north and south of the equator. Wave height and energy are greater in the southern hemisphere as westerly winds, depressions and ocean currents (the Antarctic drift) have uninterrupted passages around the globe as so little land extends south of 45 degrees, Waves hitting Chile often have the world’s longest fetches. High/


Topography, Landforms, and Geomorphology

ways. 5-3.2: Illustrate geologic landforms of the ocean floor (including the continental shelf and slope, the mid-ocean ridge, rift zone, trench, and ocean basin). 5-3.4: Explain how waves, currents, tides, and storms affect the geologic features of the ocean shore zone (including beaches, barrier islands, estuaries, and inlets). 5-3.5: Compare the movement of water by waves, currents, and tides. Table of Contents South Carolina Earth Science Education Standards/


Ocean Literacy: Updates and Future Directions Craig Strang, UC Berkeley Lawrence Hall of Science, COSEE California Sarah Schoedinger, NOAA Office of Education.

one way to teach an essential principle for a grade band Type of concept map Shows logical, coherent instructional sequence Depicts content from one essential principle for each grade/waves and coastal currents seasonally. e. Tectonic activity, sea level changes, and force of waves influence the physical structure and landforms of the coast. 42 3. Ocean is a major influence on weather & climate. a. The ocean controls weather and climate by dominating the Earths energy, water and carbon systems. b. The ocean/


EARTH SCIENCE SOL REVIEW Concepts and Topics For the End Of Course Earth Science Test.

Course Earth Science Test Oceanography Tides are the daily rise and fall of ocean water level caused by the moon’s gravitational pull 2 high and 2 low tides occur daily Spring—greatest tidal range because the moon, sun, and Earth are in alignment Neap—lowest tidal range worldwide; happens during quarter moon phases The Tides More Oceanography Waves are generated by the wind Current systems are created by/


Minerals Mineral: naturally occurring inorganic solid with a definite structure and composition.

, cool summers, and fog Ocean Current Density Current –Circulates water slowly –Change in density creates a density current Lower temp, higher density Higher salinity, higher density –EX 1: Antarctica Seawater freezes, excluding salt  extra salt increases the density of water at the surface  water sinks –EX 2: Mediterranean Sea Warm temps evaporate surface water  increases salinity and density of surface water  water sinks Ocean Waves and Tides Wave: rhythmic movement that/


LANDFORMS AND OCEANS Science Standard 5-3 The student will demonstrate an understanding of features, processes, and changes in Earths land and oceans.

and some cause a lot of damage. Large earthquakes can cause landslides. Earthquake Earthquakes under the ocean can cause huge waves (tsunamis) that can destroy land and cause great damage if they come ashore. Volcanoes And Earthquakes This map shows how volcanoes and/currents are driven by Earth’s rotation from the polar latitudes toward the equator. Currents Tides can bring in sand, shells, and ocean sediments at high tide and leave them behind when the tide goes out (low tide.) Tides Storms can cause wave /


EARTH SCIENCE SOL REVIEW Concepts and Topics For the End Of Course Earth Science Test.

Course Earth Science Test Oceanography Tides are the daily rise and fall of ocean water level caused by the moon’s gravitational pull 2 high and 2 low tides occur daily Spring—greatest tidal range because the moon, sun, and Earth are in alignment Neap—lowest tidal range worldwide; happens during quarter moon phases The Tides More Oceanography Waves are generated by the wind Current systems are created by/


Tidal Prediction November 3. Equilibrium Theory Predicts periodicities, but not actual movement of tides Predicts periodicities, but not actual movement.

tide advance) and depth are just right, can set up standing oscillation with tidal period – Resonance Natural Period of bay very close to Semi-diurnal tidal period Natural Period of bay very close to Semi-diurnal tidal period At ocean basin scale, Earth’s rotation – Coriolis force – deflects tidal currents to the right in the N. hemisphere Affects standing wave/Reference level for tide gauges and depth measurements – “Chart Datum” Geodetic Datums – fixed reference system used by surveyors, topo maps, etc. /


CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION- HAZARDS-OCEANS-WAVES NATURAL HAZARDS: FLOODS FLOODS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS HURRICANE HURRICANE DROUGHT DROUGHT.

extremely difficult to describe analytically WAVE BREAKING Types of Wave Breaking Spilling Breaker Plunging and Collapsing Breaker Surging Breaker LONG WAVE AND ABNORMAL WAVES 1.4 LONG WAVES and ABNORMAL WAVES IN NATURE TIDAL WAVES TIDAL WAVES SWELL WAVES SWELL WAVES SEICHES (RESONANCE OF BASINS) SEICHES (RESONANCE OF BASINS) FREAK WAVES FREAK WAVES 1. TIDAL WAVES Tides are the alternating rise and fall of the surface of the seas and oceans. Tides are the alternating rise and fall of the surface of/


CRCT Review. CRCT Prep Quiz 1 S6E5a. Compare and contrast the Earth’s crust, mantle, and core including temperature, density, and composition.

, the geologist would use a.Satellite imagery b.Radioactive isotopes c.Seismic mapping d.Magnetic resonance imaging 6. How do scientists know that dinosaurs and horses did not exist in the same geological eras? a.Dinosaurs would /waves, tides and currents. 1.On most ocean shorelines, the water rises slowly and covers land twice a day. Then it slowly falls back. What is this movement called? a.Current b.Wave c.Tide d.Drift 2. Which of these BEST describes the cause of waves in the ocean? a.High and low tides/


The Earth’s Oceans A Dynamic System where many physical and chemical changes are taking place!

wave caused by earthquakes Tides These are the regular rise and fall of ocean water caused by the gravitational pull between the moon and the Earth A bulge occurs in the ocean nearest the moon, this is the high tide and in the opposite is the low tide There are two high tides and two low tides a day Spring tides are highest of the high tides higher and the lowest of the low tides and neap tides/


ES. 10: Oceans: The student will investigate and understand that oceans are complex, interactive physical, chemical, and biological systems and are subject.

that oceans are complex, interactive physical, chemical, and biological systems and are subject to long- and short-term variations. Key concepts include a) physical and chemical changes related to tides, waves, currents, sea level and ice cap variations, upwelling, and salinity variations; b) importance of environmental and geologic implications; c) systems interactions; d) features of the seafloor as reflections of tectonic processes; and e) economic and public policy issues concerning the oceans and the/


CRCT Review. CRCT Prep Quiz 1 S6E5a. Compare and contrast the Earth’s crust, mantle, and core including temperature, density, and composition.

, the geologist would use a.Satellite imagery b.Radioactive isotopes c.Seismic mapping d.Magnetic resonance imaging 6. How do scientists know that dinosaurs and horses did not exist in the same geological eras? a.Dinosaurs would /waves, tides and currents. 1.On most ocean shorelines, the water rises slowly and covers land twice a day. Then it slowly falls back. What is this movement called? a.Current b.Wave c.Tide d.Drift 2. Which of these BEST describes the cause of waves in the ocean? a.High and low tides/


Chapter 3 Chemical and Physical Features of Seawater Salinity, Waves, Tides, Currents.

Chapter 3 Chemical and Physical Features of Seawater Salinity, Waves, Tides, Currents Waves A Wave is a disturbance that carries energy through matter or space. In oceans, waves move through seawater. Waves are the movement of energy, not matter. Wavelength Wave Height Crest Trough Still Water Wave Parts Parts of a Wave Crest – highest point of a wave Trough – lowest point of a wave Wave Height – vertical distance between the crest and the trough Wavelength – horizontal distance/


EARTH SCIENCE NC Final REVIEW Concepts and Topics Earth Science.

convert into usable form Oceanography Tides are the daily rise and fall of ocean water level caused by the moon’s gravitational pull 2 high and 2 low tides occur daily Spring—greatest tidal range because the moon, sun, and Earth are in alignment Neap—lowest tidal range worldwide; happens during quarter moon phases The Tides More Oceanography Waves are generated by the wind Current systems are created by/


The Oceans The Big Idea Earth’s Waters What are the causes of waves, currents, and tides?

Waters What are the causes of waves, currents, and tides? Exploring the Ocean People have studied the ocean since ancient times, because the ocean provides food and serves as a route for trade and travel. People have studied the ocean since ancient times, because the ocean provides food and serves as a route for trade and travel. Modern scientists have studied the characteristics of the ocean’s waters and the ocean floor. Modern scientists have studied/


Oceans and Ocean Movements

Zone Deep Zone Ocean Movements Ocean water moves in 3 ways: Waves Currents Tides Waves The movement that carries energy through the water Most waves are caused by wind moving over the water’s surface. Anatomy of a Wave Crest: top of the wave Trough: bottom of the wave Wave height: vertical distance between the trough and the crest Wave length: horizontal distance between two crests or troughs. Ocean Currents Masses of ocean water that flow/


Where are the Oceans? Identify the Oceans Tides Currents Waves The Ocean Floor Ocean Storms.

³) Average Depth (m) Maximum Depth (m) Atlantic Ocean 82.4323.639269200 Pacific Ocean 165.2707.6428211,022 Indian Ocean 73.4291.039637460 Arctic Ocean 14.117.012054300 On your map, color the warm currents red and the cold currents blue. Label the 4 oceans. Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean Arctic Ocean Indian Ocean Making Currents The gravitational forces of the moon and sun on the water causes the tides.. The moon, being nearest, has the greatest effect/


Classroom presentations to accompany Understanding Earth, 3rd edition prepared by Peter Copeland and William Dupré University of Houston Chapter 17 The.

. 17.6 Wave Refraction Waves Bending as they Approach the Beach Fig. 17.5 John S. Shelton Fig. 17.7 Refraction at Headlands and Bays Fig. 17.8 Longshore Drift Sediment transport near shore, parallel to the beach Longshore drift: sediment carried by swash and backwash along the beach Longshore currents: currents parallel to the beach within the surf zone Tides Twice daily rise and fall of the/


EARTH SCIENCE SOL REVIEW

are created by the Coriolis Effect and Wind. In the Northern Hemisphere, currents turn clockwise and warm water moves toward the poles and cold water moves toward the equator (convection currents) Sea level can change. Sea level rises when polar ice caps melt and sea level goes down when more ice is created. Waves are generated by the wind The ocean is the largest reservoir of heat…therefore/


Water Systems Unit Review Science 8. Question #1 Place the following steps of wave formation in order of their occurrence: A: Wind passes energy to the.

well. B: Waves are formed. Question #2 Name the four main parts of a wave Answer #2 The four main parts of a wave are: 1/main causes of tides? Where do these forces come from? Answer #14 The two main causes of tides are: 1.Gravitational Force (from the moon and sun) 2.Centrifugal/ and video 5.Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) – maps out seafloor, measures depth, and locates objects under water 6.Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) – similar to SONAR; measures current speed and ocean depth 7.Ocean-/


Review Test for Take Home Tests 8-10 Ozone and the atmosphere Earth’s waters Oceans.

oceans? A. fish B. waves C. ocean currents D. tides 54. Fish living far below the oceans surface are rarely or never displayed at seawater aquariums. Why? A. They are fast swimmers and /and California are both part of major continents. C. Ocean currents flowing near Spain and California both flow south. D. Spain and California are both in the Northern Hemisphere. 59. Use the map of ocean currents to answer the following question: A boat sailing across the Atlantic Ocean would take advantage of which current/


Ch. 15 Sec. 1 The Oceans. Oceanography Scientific study of the earths oceans Scientific study of the earths oceans Challenger: British research ship Challenger:

ship Meteor: German research ship –First to use sonar to map the sea floor –Sound Navigation Ranging Submersibles use a side-scan sonar to investigate deep ocean trenches Submersibles use a side-scan sonar to investigate deep ocean trenches Oceanography Topex/Poseidon: advance satellite Topex/Poseidon: advance satellite –Monitor ocean surface temps, currents, and wave conditions Origin of Oceans – 2 sources Comets  Meteorite when hits surface Comets  Meteorite/


-THE SCOPE OF ECOLOGY -FACTORS AFFECTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANISMS -AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL BIOMES -THE SPATIAL SCALE OF DISTRIBUTIONS CHAPTER 52 INTRODUCTION.

and a few algae--are submerged only during the highest tides and have numerous adaptations that prevent dehydration and overheating. The middle zone, generally submerged at high tide and exposed at low tide/ a conspicuous and distinctive biome. Currents and waves constantly renew nutrient supplies to the reefs, and sunlight penetrates to the ocean floor, allowing/ North America, Europe, and Asia. The distribution of major terrestrial biomes. Although terrestrial biomes are mapped here with sharp boundaries/


TIDES. Definition Tides = periodic rise and fall of large bodies of waterTides = periodic rise and fall of large bodies of water.

currents, which carry abundant nutrients. Erosion: Tides also affect erosion and coastal sediment processes, since they control to what height waves can influence the land. Storm surges (high energy waves) that occur during spring tides can be particularly damaging to the shoreline and/http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/ocean/images/bayoffundy.jpg http://www.raftingcanada.ca/ http://cord.org/cm/leot/course01_mod07/loet01-07-06new.gif http://www.canada-maps.org/nova-scotia-map.htm http://grant7.typepad.com//


Warm-Up(IN) 1/5/11 Warm ups are done individually and quietly in your desk. Warm up time is usually 5-7 minutes and is a time for you to get prepared and.

and sun affect the Earth system. What are the phases of the moon? What relationship exists between the tides and/ocean current and name the four forces that influence ocean currents. 3. What are the two types of ocean currents? Through- Classwork Ocean currents video clip Nature of Oceans PowerPoint with skeleton notes Homework: Notebook check Friday DDRG Causes of Ocean Circulation In- 3/9/11 and/ what you learned about Surface Air Pressure Patterns and maps today. Underline 5 key terms Refer your Cornell/


Atlas of Probable Storm Effects in Antigua/Barbuda and St. Kitts/Nevis Post-Georges Disaster Mitigation Project Models and data output by Watson Technical.

tide pressure setup wind setup, and wave setup, but not wave runup. Components of the Storm surge Shoreline is defined at mean low water + Astronomical high tide is added to mean low water + Low pressure of a storm system raises the water + Wind shear brings water in storm currents + Waves/ of the hurricane eye wall, as well as convergence between the cell size of the map and the wavelength of the deep ocean waves. The lower minimum value applies to wavelets on shallow sheets of water surging overland, a/


Ocean Motion 17.1 Ocean Water. I.Oceans and You II.Origin of Oceans A.Earth used to be more volcanic B.Volcanic explosions include lava, ash, water vapor,

100-km- wide Gulf Stream current to go from North America to England. b.1600s first writings of Gulf Stream c.1700s first maps G.Other Factors That Influence Surface Currents a.Coriolis effect – caused by/currents distribute heat throughout the Earth’s oceans Pg. 504 1-3 Ocean Motion 17.3 Ocean Waves and Tides I.Waves A.Wave – Rhythmic movement that carries energy through matter or space B.Crest – Highest point of a wave C.Trough – Lowest point of a wave D.Wave Height – vertical distance between crest and/


NATO UNCLASSIFIED SPONTEX 2011 2011, May 15th Access to Oceanographic Watch and Forecast Report For a correct visualisation of this product, you must click.

daily river flow. Open boundary conditions are derived from the MERCATOR-Ocean model covering the North Atlantic ocean and from the Mog2D tidal model. Results presented in this report include 3D tidal effects (tidal currents and internal tides). 3-days forecast is displayed. The Oceanographic Watch and Forecast Report : - is an electronic document displaying and analysing oceanic conditions relevant for Anti-Submarine Warfare, - is updated daily according to new/


Joshua and Jennifer Mosser, Briar Woods High School EARTH SCIENCE SOL REVIEW Concepts and Topics For Earth Science.

Oceanography Tides are the daily rise and fall of ocean water level caused by the moon’s gravitational pull 2 high and 2 low tides occur daily Spring—greatest tidal range because the moon, sun, and Earth are in alignment Neap—lowest tidal range worldwide; happens during quarter moon phases The Tides Joshua and Jennifer Mosser, Briar Woods High School More Oceanography Waves are generated by the wind Current systems/


Joshua and Jennifer Mosser, Briar Woods High School EARTH SCIENCE SOL REVIEW Concepts and Topics For Earth Science.

Oceanography Tides are the daily rise and fall of ocean water level caused by the moon’s gravitational pull 2 high and 2 low tides occur daily Spring—greatest tidal range because the moon, sun, and Earth are in alignment Neap—lowest tidal range worldwide; happens during quarter moon phases The Tides Joshua and Jennifer Mosser, Briar Woods High School More Oceanography Waves are generated by the wind Current systems/


 Who has been to an ocean?  How do we study them?  Have they always been here?

topography  Sonar: a boat emits a sound that bounces off the ocean floor. The boat records the time it takes and calculates the distance.  Side-scan sonar: sound waves leave the boat at an angle so underwater hills can be mapped.  Satellites: monitor ocean properties from space  Ocean surface temps  Ocean currentsWave conditions Crazy  Imagine a world without oceans.  Have they always been here? How did they form?  Earth/


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