Ppt on soil and land pollution

Japanese case of soil contamination countermeasures By Mr. Toshihiko Kasai Director, General Affairs Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies.

on Soil and Groundwater Pollution Research and Countermeasures related to organochlorine chemical compound” 8 Legal system of soil contamination countermeasures is not consolidated as a whole, but countermeasures based on policies, that are related to research and measures for cleaning up of soil contaminations, through administrative training is promoted “Stocked pollution”; the negative impacts from harmful substances are accumulated inside soils over a long period Contaminated soil area; private land/


Agricultural Research, Extension and Training Project ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION CONTROL PROGRAM 2001-2006 BLACK SEA CATCHMENT AREA OF GEORGIA Moldova 2006.

piezometer water and soil surface layer pollutions amounts to 0.76 having 0.95 probability C (9) Correlation between nutrient content in soil and yeild amount (productivity)  Yields of maize and tomato change similarly i.e. smilarly depend on hydrolyzed nitrogen and digestible potassium contents in soil.  Maize and tomato yield (productivity) functionally depend on hydrolyzed nitrogen and digestible potassium contents in soil i autumn.  Productivity (yield) of citrus per land plot/


European Soil Strategy Soil Pollution with Heavy Metals an overview Jan Japenga.

changes of soil processes and parameters 3.Ecological, economic and social drivers of soil threats 4.Factors (“threats”) influencing soil eco-services 5.Strategies and operational procedures for soil protection Phytoremediation European Soil Strategy – The European Soil Research Agenda Phytoremediation of heavy metals The use of plants in soil remediation and polluted land management Phytoremediation of heavy metals Phytoextraction Plants extract heavy metals from the (moderately polluted) soil and the/


Land Use. Human Nutritional requirements Males- 2500 calories; Females- 2000 calories Balanced intake of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Protein produces.

faster. Increases economic returns on investments. Produces high yield of timber at low costs and provides jobs CONS: Reduces recreation value of land, if planted on steeply sloped areas, will cause soil erosion, water pollution and flooding, reduces biodiversity, Promotes monoculture and tree plantations that are prone to disease or infestation through lack of diversity. Old-Growth Forests Not been seriously impacted by human activities for/


DZERZINSK, RUSSIA Potentially affected people: 300,000 Type of pollutants: Chemicals and toxic byproducts from Cold War-era chemical weapons.

the leather tanning process. The Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board (TN PCB) estimates that about 1,500,000 tons of solid wastes accumulated over two decades of plant operation are stacked in an open yard (three to five meters high and on 2 hectares of land) on the facility premises and contaminating the groundwater. The contamination of the soil and groundwater with wastewater, as well as/


Introduction Principles that govern the Reactions, Transport, Effects and Fate of chemical Species in air, water, soil, and Living Environment. Atmospheric.

Introduction Principles that govern the Reactions, Transport, Effects and Fate of chemical Species in air, water, soil, and Living Environment. Atmospheric reactions eg. Ozone chemistry in the Troposphere and Stratosphere. Organic chemicals. Pesticides, non-pesticides. Chemistry of natural water pollution Reactions, transport, effects and fates of chemical species in water principles of water purification. Toxic heavy metals, hazardous and municipal waste contamination. In the living environment we shall/


6. Food And Soil. Soil Ch 9: 225-231 Soil: the foundation for agriculture Land devoted to agriculture covers 38% of Earth’s land Agriculture = practice.

-It also pollutes soil, air, and water with chemicals -Fertile soil is blown and washed away Land degradation and soil conservation Human activities are limiting productivity by degrading soils in many areas Land degradation = a general deterioration of land, decreasing its productivity and biodiversity -Erosion, nutrient depletion, water scarcity, salinization, waterlogging, chemical pollution -The soil’s structure and pH change, and it loses organic material Soil conservation Land degradation is caused/


Delhi State Legal Services Authority Summer Internship 2016 Emphasis on Environmental Laws (Soil & Wildlife) Group VI.

facilities. Sometimes they also find their way into leaking pipes and gutters. They end up polluting soils and making crops harmful to our health. D. Deforestation Unfortunately, we have cut down millions of acres of trees for wood, construction, farming and mining purposes, and never planted new trees back. This is a type of land pollution. Causes of Soil Pollution  Agricultural sources: These include waste matter produced by crop, animal/


WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND POLLUTION CONTROL WMA 318 Prof. O. Martins and Dr O.Z. Ojekunle Dept of Water Res. Magt. & Agromet UNAAB. Abeokuta. Ogun State.

, there is much less filtration by the soil and a greater risk of contamination by animal wastes, pesticides, and other pollutants. In other parts of the country, like the east and some part of the south west corner, limestone sits just below the soil surface. This limestone layer, or karst, can crack, erode, and form caverns that allow water and any pollutants to travel with little filtering from the/


Waste Impacts to Safety and Health

of waterway siltation are soil erosion aggravated by the lost of vegetative cover due to land clearance for mining, and the deposition of solid materials contained in mine effluents. Mines effluent containing toxic chemicals and low pH value can also have an adverse effect on rivers. River siltation has made some areas prone to flooding especially during the rainy season. Water pollution not only affects/


M.Sc. Margareta Cvetkovska Ph.D Tatijana Mitkova*

31, provides for the protection of agricultural land against pollution and infection, for the purposes of safe food production, human health protection, protection of flora and fauna and uninterrupted use and protection of the environment. The same Article stipulates that the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Water Economy specifies matters that are harmful to agricultural land, determines their maximum permissible concentration in soil and measures to be undertaken on agricultural/


Analysis of Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil Profiles: Necessity of a Typology Luis Rodríguez-Lado 1, Florence Carré & Luca Montanarella 1 Land Management.

along Europe. The working group on Contamination and Land Management (Van Camp et al, 2004) states the needs for measuring heavy metal concentrations in soils, determining the sources of pollution, establishing background values and critical loads of pollutants for each soil type and determining the risk of pollution as basis for the development of soil quality standards. Decisions on the remediation of polluted soils are one of the most difficult management issues/


Lesson 1 People and the Environment Lesson 2 Impacts on the Land

2-3 Lesson 2-3 Waste Management (cont.) What is done to prevent the trash in landfills from polluting air, soil, and water? Lesson 2-3 Positive Actions Governments, society, and individuals can work together to reduce the impact of human activities on land resources. Protected forests and parks are important habitats for wildlife. Reforestation involves planting trees to replace trees that have been cut or/


Welcome to Environmental systems! 08/26/2013

and the natural world. Students examine environmental issues and learn to make informed decisions using scientific problem solving. Specific topics include ecological interactions, matter and energy flow in ecosystems, biodiversity, characteristics and growth of populations, evolution, succession, biogeochemical cycles, soil and land resources, agriculture, waste management, and/ a certain amount of Nuclear wastes Smoke particles Thermal pollution Sulfur gases The practice of dumping waste heat into nearby/


General Types of Water Pollution

on the bottom of a body of water. Causes Erosion of agricultural lands, forest soils exposed by logging, degraded stream banks, overgrazed rangelands, strip mines, and construction. Environmental Effects Reduces light penetration, covering aquatic organisms, bringing insoluble toxic pollutants into the water, and filling in waterways. Health Effects Sediments adversely affect water quality by carrying toxic chemicals. The sediment particles provide surface area to which/


Environmental Impacts

air. Plant trees Conserve Water Conserve Energy 5. Pollution When harmful materials that damage or contaminate the air, water and soil are released into the environment. Such as: chemicals, gasoline exhaust and industrial waste Organisms from around the world are impacted. Pollution Pollution- (Pol-lu-tion) the introduction of harmful substances or products into the environment: air pollution, water pollution, land pollution. AIR The summary: Air is what we breathe/


TOURISM AND ENVIRONMENT (THM 317)

is a geographic area including all the living organisms (people, plants, animals, and microorganisms), their physical surroundings (such as soil, water, and air), and the natural cycles that sustain them. THM 317 PHYSICAL IMPACTS 2 The ecosystems most/and spilled nearly all of its load. Unique local marine and land species and the tourism potential of the area were badly affected. THM 317 EFFECTS OF OTHER INDUSTRIES ON TOURISM 2 AGRICULTURAL RUNOFF OR INDUSTRIAL DISCHARGES can cause water pollution and/


Objective: Provide an understanding of today’s programs and agencies by understanding the intent of their creation and evolution.

with SPDES permits (e.g. CAFO, Stormwater)  Local legislation designates most Conservation Districts as the lead agency for NPS pollution.  Enacted in 1977, it charged the USDA Soil Conservation Service with compiling a National Resource Inventory (NRI).  The NRI recorded conditions of soil, water, land and related resources on private lands.  Completed in 1982, the National Resource Conservation Report brought conservation into consideration for farmland laws/


10. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

the earths surface becomes HNO3 as a consequence of nitrification and/or H+ ions as a consequence of plant uptake, (31) and it may aggravate the acidification of soils and lakes. This effect is not sufficiently considered in the assessment of NH3 emissions (e.g., agriculture, feed lots) and the use of excess NH3 in air pollution control processes to reduce nitrogen oxides. Example 10.2/


General Types of Water Pollution

on the bottom of a body of water. Causes Erosion of agricultural lands, forest soils exposed by logging, degraded stream banks, overgrazed rangelands, strip mines, and construction. Environmental Effects Reduces light penetration, covering aquatic organisms, bringing insoluble toxic pollutants into the water, and filling in waterways. Health Effects Sediments adversely affect water quality by carrying toxic chemicals. The sediment particles provide surface area to which/


ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Contaminated Land and Bioremediation

to be incompletely treated. The reagents necessary may themselves cause damage to the soil and often there is a need for some form of additional secondary treatment. Physical methods This involves the physical / disadvantages: Additional transport costs. Increased likelihood of spillage, or potential secondary pollution, represented by such movement. These approaches require a supplementary area of land for treatment and hence they are typically more expensive options. As Figure 5.1 illustrates/


Chapter 12 Food, Soil, and Pest Management

fuels Higher profits Greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) emissions Less land use Reduced overgrazing Concentration of animal wastes that can pollute water Figure 12.19: Animal feedlots and confined animal feeding operations have advantages and disadvantages. Questions: Which single advantage and which single disadvantage do you think are the most important? Why? Reduced soil erosion Use of antibiotics can increase genetic resistance to microbes in humans Protection/


Chapter 20 Agro - environmental management and practice.

of pathogens (see table 20-3)  When the faeces was directly discharged into the environment without treatment,it may :  Pollute the soil and groundwater  Pollute the surface water, even the drinking water and endangering human health  Stench pollution of the livestock’s faeces Table 20-3 Physical and chemical properties of livestock wastes Itemcattle manure bovine urine pig manure pig urinechicken manure human excrement s Moisture ( % ) 86/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management

Forests estimated that some 70% of world’s arid and semiarid lands used for agriculture are degraded and threatened by desertification. Excessive irrigation has serious consequences /and health costs are not included in the prices. Overgrazing and soil compaction and erosion by livestock have degraded about 20% of the world’s grasslands and pastures. Rangeland grazing and industrialized livestock production cause about 55% of all topsoil erosion and sediment pollution, and 33% of the water pollution/


Biology Project(Pollution) Presented by Lee Kwan Yeung Ho Wai Kit Ma Sui Long Wong Ka Lok Chan Tak Ho Wong Kin Yan Presented by Lee Kwan Yeung Ho Wai Kit.

causes of soil erosion Sources of Land Pollution in Hong Kong The economic lose cause by the pollution Rubbish Landfill The spending on solving the land pollution The damage cause by the pollution The damage of the soil erosion The problem cause by the landfill side The method to solve the pollution Pollution is the release of environmental pollutants. The major forms of pollution include: Air pollution: The release of chemicals and particulates into/


Chapter 7 Environmental geoscience  7.1 Characteristics, status and role of environmental geoscience  7.2 Combined system of human - earths environment.

and characteristics of air pollutants Diffusion and study methods of pollutant in atmospheric Generalized atmospheric dispersion means the pollutant entering into air is gradually dispersed and diluted with wind, rapid current, uplift, subsidence, dry and wet deposition, chemical conversion, and other progress. Although it benefits mitigate local air pollution, the influence basin of pollutant will be expanded, and the secondary pollution may be induced or the pollution may be transferred to the soil and/


Hygiene Department, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Dalian Medical University © 2006 1 Chapter 3 Water and Soil.

living organisms or makes water unsuitable for desired uses. A natural indicator of water pollution is the presence of coliform bacteria. 0 colonies is recommended, and 200 colonies per 100 milliliters is the maximum recommended level Most water pollutants are sediment and suspended matter. These consist of soil and solids eroded from land Hygiene Department, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Dalian Medical University © 2006 16 Because of/


Soils, agriculture, and the future of food

strains with a few monoculture strains Soil Erosion Loss of fertility Salinization Waterlogging Desertification Air Pollution Water Greenhouse gas emissions from fossil Fuel issue Other air pollutants from fossil fuel use Pollution from pesticide sprays Water Water waste Aquifer depletion Increased runoff and flooding from land cleared to grow crops Sediment pollution from erosion Fish kills from pesticide runoff Surface and groundwater pollution from pesticides and fertilizers Overfertilization of lakes/


Water Resources and Water Pollution

to prevent or reduce cultural eutrophication: Advanced (but expensive) waste treatment to remove nitrates and phosphates before wastewater enters lakes. Too little mixing and low water flow make lakes vulnerable to water pollution Banning or limiting the use of phosphates in household detergents and other cleaning agents. Employ soil conservation and land-use control to reduce nutrient runoff. Ways to clean up lakes suffering from cultural eutrophication/


Water Resources and Water Pollution

to prevent or reduce cultural eutrophication: Advanced (but expensive) waste treatment to remove nitrates and phosphates before wastewater enters lakes. Too little mixing and low water flow make lakes vulnerable to water pollution Banning or limiting the use of phosphates in household detergents and other cleaning agents. Employ soil conservation and land-use control to reduce nutrient runoff. Ways to clean up lakes suffering from cultural eutrophication/


Health Consequences of Environmental Degradation and Social Injustice Martin Donohoe, M.D., F.A.C.P.

Degradation Death (40% of world’s yearly deaths linked to water, air, and soil pollution) Death (40% of world’s yearly deaths linked to water, air, and soil pollution) War War Ecological footprint (22 hectares/person) exceeds Earth’s biological capacity (16/- $10.5 billion/yr Coal - $8 billion/yr Coal - $8 billion/yr Ranching (grazing on public lands) - $52 million/yr Ranching (grazing on public lands) - $52 million/yr Timber (below cost sales of national forest trees) – approx. $350 million/yr Timber /


Air, Water and Land Pollution Chapter 5: Investigating the Environment Copyright © 2009 by DBS.

://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/trace/arsenic Types of Monitoring Ambient Monitoring Sediments and Soil Monitoring May become polluted in a number of ways: (a) Substances may get into soil/plants and then into the food supply (b) Substances may wash from the land and pollute water supplies (c) Contaminants may be resuspended and subsequently inhaled (d) Substances polluting the land may make it unsuitable for future use (e) Ecological systems may/


This lecture will help you understand: The relationship between soils and agriculture Fundamentals of soil science Soil erosion and degradation Principles.

forests; diminishes biodiversity; and pollutes soil, air, and water. – Fertile soil is blown and washed away. – Land suitable for farming is running out. – We must improve the efficiency of food production. Soil as a system Soil: a plant-supporting system consisting of disintegrated rock, organic matter, air, gases, nutrients – Dead and living microorganisms and decaying material – Bacteria, algae, earthworms, insects, and other animals Since soil is composed of living and non-living matter, it/


SNIST/Biotech/Ravindra/ES/41 Environmental Pollution Unit - 5 Dr. P. Ravindra Babu, Associate Professor, Dept. of Biotechnology, Sreenidhi Institute of.

have air temperatures up to 10º F (5.6º C) warmer than their surrounding natural land cover. SNIST/Biotech/Ravindra/ES/4124 Radioactive (nuclear) pollution is a special form of physical pollution related to all major life-supporting systems—air, water and soil. Radioactivity is the phenomenon of emission of energy from radioactive isotopes (i.e. unstable isotopes), such as Carbon-14, Uranium-235, Uranium/


Health Consequences of Environmental Degradation and Social Injustice Martin Donohoe, M.D., F.A.C.P.

Degradation Death (40% of world’s yearly deaths linked to water, air, and soil pollution) Death (40% of world’s yearly deaths linked to water, air, and soil pollution) War War Ecological footprint (22 hectares/person) exceeds Earth’s biological capacity (16/- $10.5 billion/yr Coal - $8 billion/yr Coal - $8 billion/yr Ranching (grazing on public lands) - $52 million/yr Ranching (grazing on public lands) - $52 million/yr Timber (below cost sales of national forest trees) – approx. $350 million/yr Timber /


1. Plan Definition Type aspects of pollution Causes Consequences How can we save the world 2.

.effects of water pollution Different Types of pollution 11 Soil Pollution Soil, or land pollution, is contamination of the soil that prevents natural growth and balance in the land whether it is used for cultivation, habitation, or a wildlife preserve. Some soil pollution, such as the creation of landfills, is deliberate, while much more is accidental and can have widespread effects. Soil Pollution Soil, or land pollution, is contamination of the soil that prevents natural growth and balance in the/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 10. WHAT IS FOOD SECURITY AND WHY IS IT DIFFICULT TO ATTAIN? Section 10-1.

of irrigated land per person has been declining, due to population growth, wasteful use of irrigation water, soil salinization, and depletion of both aquifers and surface water, and the fact /and health costs are not included in the prices. Overgrazing and soil compaction and erosion by livestock have degraded about 20% of the world’s grasslands and pastures. Rangeland grazing and industrialized livestock production cause about 55% of all topsoil erosion and sediment pollution, and 33% of the water pollution/


Environmental Chemistry Chapter 18: Soil, Agriculture, and Food Production Copyright © 2011 by DBS.

Production Copyright © 2011 by DBS Contents Soil and Agriculture Soil: Essential for Life, Key to Sustainability Nature and Composition of Soil Acid-Base and Ion-Exchange Reactions in Soils Macronutrients in Soil Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium in Soil Micronutrients in Soil Soil Loss and Deterioration Wastes and Pollutants in Soil Saving the Land Process Intensification in Agriculture Sustainable Agricultural Management Agroforestry Soil and Agriculture Soil layer is extremely thin Essential to support/


Mid-Atlantic Nutrient Management Handbook Powerpoint presentation prepared by Kathryn Haering Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo,

the Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987.  The Part 503 Rule establishes minimum requirements when biosolids are applied to land to condition the soil or fertilize crops or other vegetation grown in the soil.  Determination of biosolids quality is based on trace element (pollutant) concentrations and pathogen and vector attraction reduction.  Federal regulations require that state regulations be at least as stringent as the Part 503/


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

meat production. Fig. 13-21, p. 289 Trade-Offs Animal Feedlots AdvantagesDisadvantages Increased meat production Need large inputs of grain, fish meal, water, and fossil fuels Higher profits Concentrate animal wastes that can pollute water Less land use Reduced overgrazing Reduced soil erosion Antibiotics can increase genetic resistance to microbes in humans Help protect biodiversity How Many People can the World Support? Food Production/


FOOD RESOURCES PART-II. Types of Agriculture Industrialized Agriculture – “Agribusiness” or high-input agriculture Developed countries Land – moderate.

few monoculture strains Soil Erosion Loss of fertility Salinization Waterlogging Desertification Air Pollution Greenhouse gas emissions from fossil Fuel issue Other air pollutants from fossil fuel use Pollution from pesticide sprays Water Water waste Aquifer depletion Increased runoff and flooding from land cleared to grow crops Sediment pollution from erosion Fish kills from pesticide runoff Surface and groundwater pollution from pesticides and fertilizers Overfertilization of lakes and slow-moving rivers/


COMMON FORUM ON CONTAMINATED LAND IN EUROPE The International Committee on Contaminated Land and the European Common Forum networks Dominique DARMENDRAIL.

)  Definitions of contaminated sites : « well-defined area where the presence of soil contamination has been confirmed and this presents a potential risk to humans, water, ecosystems or other receptors »  A: Polluted sites or contaminated sites?  B: Polluted sites (with or without site-specific risk assessment done yet) 13 COMMON FORUM ON CONTAMINATED LAND IN EUROPE Clarifications needed (3/5) Sites at risk!  Definitions of potentially/


Assessment of Vietnam’s Policy and Legal Framework on Contaminated Soil Monitoring Strengthening Contaminated Soil Monitoring in Vietnam AECEN Twinning.

of pesticides, treatment of obsolete pesticide stockpiles + Environmental protection of urban, industrial areas, trade villages + Management and control of pollution sources, establishments causing environmental problems + Environmental impact assessment + Land use planning and some others including protection of soil + Economic norms for different issues related to wastewater and solid water, fee for environmental protection in mining, manufacture, business, etc. Key gaps & challenges Lack: a synchronous/


Environment What is the environment? The natural environment encompasses all living & and non-living things occurring naturally on Earth.

of “Blackfish” http://www.dailylife.com.au/news-and-views/dl- opinion/keeping-animals-in-captivity-for-our-own- entertainment-must-stop-20131126-2y7uz.html http/Issues continued… Genetic engineering Genetic pollution Genetically modified food controversies Intensive farming Overgrazing Irrigation Environmental effects of meat production Overpopulation Burial Land degradation Desertification Soil, Soil conservation, Soil Erosion, Soil Contamination, Soil salinization Land use Urban sprawl Habitat fragmentation/


Objectives Distinguish between renewable and nonrenewable resources. What are resources? Identify renewable and nonrenewable resources. –natural resource.

grow, develop, maintain life processes, and reproduce. What are resources? Natural Resources Natural resources are the resources that Earth provides, including air, water, and land; all living things; and nutrients, rocks, and minerals in the soil and deep in Earth’s crust. What/of an ore because it contains iron. ______ The gases released from a volcanic explosion are considered air pollution. ______Rates of freshwater withdrawal are expected to triple within the next 20 years. ______ Placer deposits are a/


WEL COME. Land pollution is the addition of undesirable matter to the land that damage the terrestrial organisms, reduce the uses of the land by man.

. A single acre of wetlands can hold more than of one and a half million gallons of water, which runoff can taint, eventually leading to soil pollution. Work to restore wetlands and reduce NSP. Support local conservation efforts by donating to or volunteering with organizations such as The Nature Conservancy that purchase land for restoration. Reduction of Human Impact Finally, simply reduce your negative impact/


Contaminated Land Management Framework in Malaysia By Hazardous Substances Division Department of Environment 1.

.  Industries with the potential of contaminating soil and groundwater. 2.Any land that will involve in a change of land use from polluting activities to non polluting activities 7 Overview of Contaminated Land Management Framework in Malaysia GENERAL GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1.Polluter Pay Principle  Define the responsibility for performing a site assessment and remediation.  Polluter can be the land owner or land occupier or any polluter of any land. 2.Risk-Based Approach  Highlights/


WATERSHEDS UNIT If you are absent, please look through this power point to find the notes you missed in class and highlight them the appropriate colors.

. There are four major forms of NPS pollution: sediments, nutrients, toxic substances and pathogens. 1. Sediments are soil particles carried by rainwater into streams, lakes, rivers and bays. By volume, sediment is the greatest pollutant of all. Its caused mainly by erosion resulting from bare land, poor farming practices, and construction and development. 2. Nutrients are substances which help plants and animals live and grow. NPS officials are most concerned/


Energy Resources Energy is used for domestic purpose, agricultural purpose, production of industrial goods and for the transportation purpose. In fact.

The wind farms are the source of noise pollution and also results into bird deaths due to bird /land becomes loose and more prone to soil erosion. The top fertile layer is also lost and thus plant growth is badly hampers in such soils. 3)Mining and quarrying: These activities results into loss of vegetation cover and denudation of extensive land area leading to desertification. Conservation of natural resources: Role of an Individual Natural resources like forest, water, soil, food, mineral, energy and land/


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN Chapter 12 Food, Soil, and Pest Management.

? Fig. 12-19, p. 295 Trade-Offs Animal Feedlots AdvantagesDisadvantages Large inputs of grain, fish meal, water, and fossil fuels Increased meat production Greenhouse gas (CO 2 and CH 4 ) emissions Higher profits Less land use Reduced overgrazing Concentration of animal wastes that can pollute water Reduced soil erosion Use of antibiotics can increase genetic resistance to microbes in humans Protection of biodiversity Fig. 12/


Ads by Google