Ppt on producers consumers and decomposers ecosystem

Producers, Consumers, Decomposers Relationships Ecosystems Grab Bag Miscellaneous $100100 $100100 $100100 $100100 $100100 $200200 $300300 $500500 $400400.

Producers, Consumers, Decomposers Relationships Ecosystems Grab Bag Miscellaneous $100100 $100100 $100100 $100100 $100100 $200200 $300300 $500500 $400400 $500500 $400400 $300300 $200200 $300300 $200200 $400400 $500500 $300300 $200200 $400400 $500500 $300300 $200200 $400400 $500500 Producers, Consumers, Decomposers - $100 These use the process of photosynthesis to make their own food and energy. Producers, Consumers, Decomposers - $100 What are producers? Back Producers, Consumers, Decomposers - $200 These /


13.1 Ecologists Study Relationships KEY CONCEPT Ecology is the study of the relationships among organisms and their environment.

feeding relationships. A food chain follows the connection between one producer and a single chain of consumers within an ecosystem. DESERT COTTONTAILGRAMA GRASSHARRIS’S HAWK 13.4 13.1 Ecologists Study Relationships Consumers are not all alike. –Herbivores eat only plants. –Carnivores eat only animals. –Omnivores eat both plants and animals. –Detritivores eat dead organic matter. –Decomposers are detritivores that break down organic matter into simpler compounds/


Chapter 4 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work? PLEASE CHANGE TO CHAPTER 4 AND PUT YOUR NAME ON THIS PACKET.

that eat producersPrimary consumers that eat producers Carnivores Carnivores Primary consumers eat primary consumersPrimary consumers eat primary consumers Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores.Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores. Omnivores Omnivores Feed on both plant and animals.Feed on both plant and animals. Decomposers and Detrivores Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Detrivores: Insects or/


Ecosystems And Energy Flow. Ecology The study of how organisms interact with one another and with their nonliving environment The study of how organisms.

zone only Land zoneTransition zoneAquatic zone Number of species Adjacent Ecosystems Ecotone Notice the lack of sharp Boundaries Great Diversity Sun Producers (rooted plants) Producers (phytoplankton) Primary consumers (zooplankton) Secondary consumer (fish) Dissolved chemicals Tertiary consumer (turtle) Sediment Decomposers (bacteria and fungi) Sun Producer Precipitation Falling leaves and twigs Producers Primary consumer (rabbit) Secondary consumer (fox) Carbon dioxide (rabbit) Oxygen (O 2 ) Water Soil/


Chapter 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

that eat producersPrimary consumers that eat producers Carnivores Carnivores Primary consumers eat primary consumersPrimary consumers eat primary consumers Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores.Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores. Omnivores Omnivores Feed on both plant and animals.Feed on both plant and animals. Decomposers and Detrivores Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Detrivores: Insects or/


Ecosystems Science 10. Biosphere This is the title given to the area of the earth where life exists. This is the title given to the area of the earth.

, other producers) HETEROTROPHS (consumers, decomposers) energy output (mainly heat) Consumers Herbivores Herbivores Carnivores Carnivores Parasites Parasites Omnivores Omnivores Decomposers Decomposers Detritivores Detritivores SPRING rodents, rabbits fruits insects birds SUMMER rodents, rabbits fruits insects birds Seasonal variation in the diet of an omnivore (red fox) Does one ecosystem hold more energy than another? Does one ecosystem hold more energy than another? How is energy stored and transferred/


Chapter 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

that eat producersPrimary consumers that eat producers Carnivores Carnivores Primary consumers eat primary consumersPrimary consumers eat primary consumers Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores.Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores. Omnivores Omnivores Feed on both plant and animals.Feed on both plant and animals. Decomposers and Detrivores Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Detrivores: Insects or/


Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work? Chapter 3.

if all other factors are at or near the optimal range of tolerance Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (1)  Producers, autotrophs Photosynthesis Chemosynthesis  Consumers, heterotrophs Primary Secondary Third and higher level  Decomposers Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (2)  Detritivores  Aerobic respiration  Anaerobic respiration, fermentation Detritivores and Decomposers on a Log Fig. 3-11, p. 60 Mushroom Detritus feedersDecomposers Long/


Chapter 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

that eat producersPrimary consumers that eat producers Carnivores Carnivores Primary consumers eat primary consumersPrimary consumers eat primary consumers Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores.Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores. Omnivores Omnivores Feed on both plant and animals.Feed on both plant and animals. Decomposers and Detrivores Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Detrivores: Insects or/


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN CHAPTER 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

H 2 O + sunlight → glucose + oxygen Chemosynthesis Consumers, heterotrophs Primary consumers = herbivores Secondary consumers Tertiary consumers Carnivores, Omnivores Producers Fig. 3-7a, p. 59 Consumers Fig. 3-8a, p. 60 Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (2) Decomposers Consumers that release nutrients Bacteria Fungi Detritivores Feed on dead bodies of other organisms Earthworms Vultures Decomposer Fig. 3-9a, p. 61 Detritivores and Decomposers Fig. 3-10, p. 61 Detritus feeders/


Unit 5: The Cycling of Matter & Energy. Community of interacting organisms within a biome living in BalanceBalance Ecosystems Each organism plays a role.

these Critters Energy Flow in Ecosystems Primary Consumers eat Producers for nutrients and energy Solar Energy from the Sun Producers photosynthesize to make carbohydrates Secondary Consumers eat Primary Consumers for nutrients and energy Decomposers recycle dead organic waste (biomass) Energy Transfer Tertiary Consumers eat Secondary Consumers for nutrients and energy Energy Flow within an Ecosystem Sun Producers Primary Consumer Secondary/Tertiary Consumer Decomposers Heat Chemical Energy Solar Energy/


Chapter 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

that eat producersPrimary consumers that eat producers Carnivores Carnivores Primary consumers eat primary consumersPrimary consumers eat primary consumers Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores.Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores. Omnivores Omnivores Feed on both plant and animals.Feed on both plant and animals. Decomposers and Detrivores Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Detrivores: Insects or/


Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work? Chapter 3.

if all other factors are at or near the optimal range of tolerance Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (1)  Producers, autotrophs Photosynthesis Chemosynthesis  Consumers, heterotrophs Primary Secondary Third and higher level  Decomposers Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (2)  Detritivores  Aerobic respiration  Anaerobic respiration, fermentation Detritivores and Decomposers on a Log Fig. 3-11, p. 60 Mushroom Detritus feedersDecomposers Long/


AP Biology Ecosystems AP Biology biosphere ecosystem community population Studying organisms in their environment organism.

 transfer energy  cycle nutrients AP Biology biosphere Ecosystem inputs constant input of energy energy flows through nutrients cycle nutrients can only cycle inputs  energy  nutrients inputs  energy  nutrients Don’t forget the laws of Physics! Matter cannot be created or destroyed AP Biology consumers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients made available to producers geologic processes Generalized Nutrient cycling consumers producers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients ENTER FOOD CHAIN = made/


ECOLOGY Part 2. What is “Ecology”? The study of biological organization “at and above the level of the organism”. (one definition) What are “levels of.

photosynthesis CH 2 O respiration O2O2 CO 2, H 2 O Ecosystems – nutrient cycling Producers Nutrients Decomposers OM Consumers Reservoir Ecosystems Trophic Structure – The energy pyramid Energy flows through the ecosystem – from sun to space Energy is transformed by photosynthesis from light to chemicals (e.g., sugar) Energy of chemicals is transformed from producers to consumers and to decomposers -Respiration (can be >90% of energy taken in) -The energy transformations/


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN CHAPTER 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

H 2 O + sunlight → glucose + oxygen Chemosynthesis Consumers, heterotrophs Primary consumers = herbivores Secondary consumers Tertiary consumers Carnivores, Omnivores Producers Fig. 3-7a, p. 59 Consumers Fig. 3-8a, p. 60 Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (2) Decomposers Consumers that release nutrients Bacteria Fungi Detritivores Feed on dead bodies of other organisms Earthworms Vultures Decomposer Fig. 3-9a, p. 61 Detritivores and Decomposers Fig. 3-10, p. 61 Detritus feeders/


AP Biology Ecosystems AP Biology Ecosystem  All the organisms in a community plus abiotic factors  ecosystems are transformers of energy & processors.

producers geologic processes Generalized Nutrient cycling consumers producers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients ENTER FOOD CHAIN = made available to producers geologic processes Decomposition connects all trophic levels return to abiotic reservoir AP Biology Carbon cycle CO 2 in atmosphere Diffusion Respiration Photosynthesis Plants and algae Plants Animals Industry and/  planting trees in Kenya  restoring a sustainable ecosystem  establishing democracy  empowering women Wangari Maathai Nobel /


AP Biology Ecosystems AP Biology  YouTube - Prehranjevalna veriga - Food Chain YouTube - Prehranjevalna veriga - Food Chain  Teachers Domain: Oil.

consumers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients made available to producers geologic processes Generalized Nutrient cycling consumers producers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients ENTER FOOD CHAIN = made available to producers geologic processes Decomposition connects all trophic levels return to abiotic reservoir AP Biology biosphere Ecosystem/ H 12 O 6 ). As a result of CR you exhale CO 2. 2. The tree dies and decomposers feast on remains (CR) giving off CO 2. A crop plant takes in the CO 2. You eat/


AP Biology Ecosystems AP Biology biosphere ecosystem community population Studying organisms in their environment organism.

 transfer energy  cycle nutrients AP Biology biosphere Ecosystem inputs constant input of energy energy flows through nutrients cycle nutrients can only cycle inputs  energy  nutrients inputs  energy  nutrients Don’t forget the laws of Physics! Matter cannot be created or destroyed AP Biology consumers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients made available to producers geologic processes Generalized Nutrient cycling consumers producers decomposers abiotic reservoir nutrients ENTER FOOD CHAIN = made/


© 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. CHAPTER 5 Ecosystems: Energy, Patterns, and Disturbance.

inorganic constituents through the use of an external energy source Also referred to as producers Green plants, some single-celled organisms and bacteria Heterotrophs: must consume organic material to obtain energy Consumers: eat living prey Decomposers: scavengers, detritus feeders, chemical decomposers eat dead organic material © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Producers are essential to every ecosystem They capture energy from the Sun or chemical reactions Converting CO 2 to/


Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work? Chapter 3.

if all other factors are at or near the optimal range of tolerance Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (1)  Producers, autotrophs Photosynthesis Chemosynthesis  Consumers, heterotrophs Primary Secondary Third and higher level  Decomposers Producers and Consumers Are the Living Components of Ecosystems (2)  Detritivores  Aerobic respiration  Anaerobic respiration, fermentation Detritivores and Decomposers on a Log Fig. 3-11, p. 60 Mushroom Detritus feedersDecomposers Long/


© Cengage Learning 2015 LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT, 18e G. TYLER MILLER SCOTT E. SPOOLMAN © Cengage Learning 2015 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do.

Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) Producer Secondary consumer (fox) Primary consumer (rabbit) Producers Water Decomposers Soluble mineral nutrients Fig. 3-5, p. 56 Major Biotic and Abiotic Components of an Ecosystem © Cengage Learning 2015 Producers (autotrophs) –Photosynthesis CO 2 + H 2 O + sunlight → glucose + oxygen Consumers (heterotrophs) –Primary consumers = herbivores –Secondary consumers –Tertiary consumers –Carnivores, omnivores Ecosystems Have Several Important Components (cont’d.) Producers Fig. 3-6, p. 56/


Chapter 3 Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work?

that eat producersPrimary consumers that eat producers Carnivores Carnivores Primary consumers eat primary consumersPrimary consumers eat primary consumers Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores.Third and higher level consumers: carnivores that eat carnivores. Omnivores Omnivores Feed on both plant and animals.Feed on both plant and animals. Decomposers and Detrivores Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Decomposers: Recycle nutrients in ecosystems. Detrivores: Insects or/


Ecosystems Review.  A group of parts working as one unit is a …

, at the same time is a…  A population  Nonliving parts of an ecosystem (5-SWATS)…  Sunlight  Water  Soil  Air  temperature  All populations living in the same area is a… A community Name the 3 levels of a food chain  ProducersConsumers (and secondary)  Decomposers  Overlapping food chains are called… Food webs Coral reefs and tropical rain forests both (name 2 things they have in common)…  Are/


Ecosystems. Biotics and Abiotics List what you found in the dirt. What was alive or was once alive? What was not (or never) living? Biotics (a living.

Here’s a game about food webs you can try http://coolclassroom.org/cool_windows/home.html BrainPOP Here’s a video review of food chains, food webs, and how producers, consumers, and decomposers are all interconnected in an ecosystem. https://www.brainpop.com/science/ecologyandbehavior/foodchains/ Here’s a fun food web game to play with a friend. https://www.brainpop.com/games/foodfight/ Competition Competition/


Before, you learned Matter cycles continuously through an ecosystem Living things are part of the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles Now, you will.

some energy is lost at each level that the diagram takes the shape of a pyramid. KEY CONCEPTS 1. Describe the role of producers, consumers, and decomposers in an ecosystem. 2. Explain why a food web provides a better model of an ecosystem than a food chain does. 3. Explain how the amount of available energy changes as energy moves up a food chain. CRITICAL THINKING/


· 4 th Grade Science What did you have for lunch today (or yesterday)? Sort food into 2 categories: Plant and Animal Why do we need to eat? Where do.

? Where do cows get the energy they need to build muscle and produce milk? Where do plants, like the lettuce we eat, get the energy they need to make leaves? Organisms in an ecosystem depend on each other for the energy they need to survive. Classify organisms in an ecosystem as a producer, consumer, or decomposer. Some living things make their own food. Some living things get/


36.1 Feeding relationships determine the path of energy and chemicals in the ecosystem.

36.1 Feeding relationships determine the path of energy and chemicals in the ecosystem I. Energy Flow and Chemical Cycling A. Energy enters an ecosystem as light. B. Photosynthetic producers, like plants, change light energy to chemical energy (organic compounds). C. Consumers obtain chemical energy by feeding on producers or on other consumers. D. Decomposers break down wastes and dead organisms. E. As living things use chemical energy, they release heat/


Unit 2: The Biosphere and Energy Flow

Pyramids: 1. Ecological Pyramids-a model which shows how energy flows through an ecosystem. Pyramid of Energy -Pyramid of Energy-shows how energy decreases at each trophic level. Only 10% of the energy is passed up each level! Heat 0.1% Consumers Heat 1% Consumers 10% Consumers Heat 100% Producers Heat Parasites, scavengers, and decomposers feed at each level. Pyramid of Numbers -Pyramid of Biomass- shows the/


5.3.1 Ecosystems define the term ecosystem;

pH Mutualism Light intensity Temperature Wind speed Organic ion availability competition Oxygen concentration 5.3.1 Ecosystems define the term ecosystem; state that ecosystems are dynamic systems; define the terms biotic factor and abiotic factor, using named examples; define the terms producer, consumer, decomposer and trophic level; describe how energy is transferred though ecosystems; outline how energy transfers between trophic levels can be measured; discuss the efficiency of energy/


Chapter 4 Ecosystems & Energy.

for energy. Release simple inorganic molecules (CO2 + mineral salts) that producers reuse. Sapro = “rotten” Troph = “nourishment” Ex: bacteria and fungi Difference between Detritivore and Decomposer: Detritivores actually EAT dead/decaying matter. Decomposers secrete enzymes that digest the organic matter, and then absorb the remaining molecules for nutrition. 3 Ecological Categories Producers Consumers Decomposers Flow of Energy through Ecosystems FOOD CHAIN = energy from food passes from one organism to/


ECOSYSTEM.

maintenance of human health by providing opportunities for spiritual enrichment, cognitive development, recreation and aesthetic experience.  Structure of Ecosystem Living/ Biotic Components Producers Consumers Herbivores Carnivores Omnivores Detritivores Decomposers Non-Living/ Abiotic Components Physical components Chemical Components Biotic Components of Ecosystem Different living organisms constitute the biotic components of an ecosystem. This refers to large life-forms such as trees or mammals, small/


Ecology Scientific study of interactions among organisms and between organisms and their physical environment.

smaller pieces. Detritivores commonly digest decomposers that live on, and in, detritus particles. Decomposer Organisms that breakdown and absorb nutrients from dead organisms. Fungi, protozoans, bacteria Beyond Consumers Categorizing consumers is important, but these simple /producers to consumers, and to the rest of the ecosystem. The Phosphorus Cycle Other phosphate washes into rivers and streams, where it dissolves. This phosphate eventually makes its way to the ocean, where marine organisms process and/


Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. PowerPoint Lectures for Biology: Concepts & Connections, Sixth Edition Campbell, Reece, Taylor, Simon, and Dickey.

nutrients in aquatic ecosystems –Algal and cyanobacteria blooms –Eutrophication Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  The most serious current threats –Acid precipitation –Changes in land use –Climate warming 37.23 TALKING ABOUT SCIENCE: David Schindler talks about the effects of nutrients on freshwater ecosystems Video: Cyanobacteria (Oscillatoria) Decomposers Producer Energy flow Chemical cycling Herbivore (primary consumer) Carnivore (secondary consumer) chemical elements Ecosystems involve the/


Adaptations An adaptation (or adaptive feature) is an inherited feature of an organism that enables it to survive and reproduce in its habitat. Adaptations.

per unit time through photosynthesis) sets the limit for the energy budget of an ecosystem. Consumer (C1) Consumer (C2) Consumer (C3) Organization of Trophic Levels Trophic structure can be described by trophic level or consumer level: Detritivores and Decomposers Major Trophic Levels Trophic Level Source of Energy Examples Producers Solar energy Green plants, photosynthetic protists and bacteria Herbivores Grasshoppers, water fleas, antelope, termites Primary Carnivores Wolves, spiders, some snakes/


KEY CONCEPT Life in an ecosystem requires a source of energy.

by the producers and potentially available to consumers and decomposers. Secondary productivity is the rate of production of new biomass by consumers, i.e., the rate at which consumers convert organic material into new biomass of consumers. CONCLUSION Energy flow follows the second law of thermodynamics Biomass decreases with increasing trophic level Ecological efficiency – typically 10% Food Web Activity KEY CONCEPT Matter cycles in and out of an ecosystem. Water/


APES Unit 2 Abiotic and Biotic Parts of Ecosystems

into environment Trophic levels or feeding levels- Producer is a first trophic level, primary consumer is second trophic level, secondary consumer is third. Decomposers process detritus from all trophic levels. Food Web Complex network of interconnected food chains Food web and chains One-way flow of energy Cycling of nutrients through ecosystem Food Webs Grazing Food Webs Energy and nutrients move from plants to herbivores Then through/


Ecosystems: Components, Energy Flow, and Matter Cycling

the feeding hierarchy Producers Consumers Detritivores and Decomposers 12 12 Biotic Components of Ecosystems Producers=autotroph Source of all food Photosynthesis Consumers=heterotroph Aerobic respiration Anaerobic respiration Methane, H2S Decomposers Matter recyclers… Release organic compounds into soil and water where they can be used by producers Heat Abiotic chemicals (carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, minerals) Producers (plants) Decomposers (bacteria, fungus) Consumers (herbivores, carnivores) Solar/


Unit 3 Ecosystems Chapter 6 & 7.

sun’s energy. Actually “produce” their own food and food for the rest of the ecosystem Differentiate the terms producers, consumers, decomposers. P. 93 Consumers = All those organisms that have to eat (consume) plants or animals to obtain their food. Types of consumers Primary Consumers: Animals that eat producers. Also called 1st. order consumers. (Ex. Rabbit, squirrels, grouse, insects) Secondary Consumers: Animals that eat primary consumers. Also called 2nd. order consumers. (fox, owl, mink ) Tertiary/


Communities & Ecosytems

Ecosystems are supplied with a continual influx of energy Sun Earth’s interior Life also depends on the recycling of chemicals Organisms acquire chemicals as nutrients and lose chemicals as waste products Chemical Cycles Biogeochemical cycles Nutrient cycles that contain both biotic and abiotic components. Cycle chemicals between organisms and the Earth Can be local or global Decomposers play a central role in biogeochemical cycles Consumers Producers Decomposers/


Ecosystem Model.

or function of an organism or species in an ecosystem. - The interaction of all biotic and abiotic factors relating to it. Biotic Abiotic Species Community Habitat Draw and complete chart! Biotic Abiotic Species Community Habitat Definition Example 8L 3.2 Summarize the relationships among produces, consumers, and decomposers including the positive and negative consequences of such interaction. Food Chains and Food Webs 1 What is energy? 2 Why is/


Ecological Interactions StAIR Project Margaret Milligan-Joye My name’s Ernie. Click on me to begin For use in the Unit: Matter & Energy in Ecosystems of.

for energy lost to the environment as heat. B3.2C Draw the flow of energy through an ecosystem. Predict changes in the food web when one or more organisms are removed. B3.3A Use a food web to identify and distinguish producers, consumers, and decomposers and explain the transfer of energy through trophic levels. Objectives taken from Michigan Merit Curriculum for Biology *The above objectives will be/


Energy in Ecosystems II

estimating the biomass of trophic levels in an ecosystem Syllabus Statements 2.5.1: Explain the role of producers consumers and decomposers in an ecosystem 2.5.3: Describe and explain the transfer and transformation of energy as it flows through an ecosystem vocabulary Abiotic factor Biomass Biotic factor Ecosystem Standing crop Trophic Level Ecosystems Are communities and their interactions with the abiotic environment Ecosystem Components 2 parts Abiotic – nonliving components (water, air/


Ecosystems.

paper, describe what would happen if there was a drought and there was a decrease in the population of the producers. Be sure to explain what would happen to both the consumers and the decomposers. If plants or prey (hunted animals) become scarce, their predators may move to a new area. What will happen to the ecosystem the predators move into? Food Chain Game Go to/


Chapter 6 Life Systems.

, water sun, temperature etc.) that affect each other. It is the system of relationships between the organisms and between the organisms and the non-living environment that makes up the ecosystem. Ecosystem Organisms in an Ecosystem Producers Consumers Decomposers Organisms in an Ecosystem Producer: a plant which can synthesize carbohydrates using carbon dioxide and the sun’s energy. for example in figure 6.3 on page 94 all the plants, like/


Producers, Consumers and Decomposers

Producers, Consumers and Decomposers All organisms in an ecosystem need energy to live. Organisms can be grouped by how they get energy. Organisms in an ecosystem are grouped as producers, consumers, or decomposers. You get your energy from the food you eat. ALL the food energy on Earth comes from the sun. Without the sun everything on Earth would go hungry and die in time. Living Things Living things are divided/


Ecology: The Study of Ecosystems Mrs. Hart Biology.

Consumers, Secondary Consumers, Tertiary Consumers, Decomposers Producers, Primary Consumers, Secondary Consumers, Tertiary Consumers, Decomposers Food Webs Many interconnected food chains within an ecosystem Many interconnected food chains within an ecosystem Can be very complicated Can be very complicated Quick Quiz: 1. What only eats plants? 2. Who always starts the food chain? 3. Who eats plants AND animals? 4. Who only eats animals? 5. How is a Food Web different from a/


Topic 2: Ecosystems 2.1 Structure. Ecology ‣ Ecology is the study of the relationships between organisms and their physical and biotic environment: Relationships.

through photosynthesis) sets the limit for the energy budget of an ecosystem. Consumer (C3) Consumer (C2) Consumer (C1) Producer (P) Producers are able to manufacture their food from simple inorganic substances (e.g. CO 2 ). Producers include green plants, algae and other photosynthetic protists, and some bacteria. Producers Solar radiation Death Some tissue is not eaten by consumers and becomes food for decomposers. Wastes Metabolic waste products are released. Respiration Heat given off/


36.1 Feeding relationships determine the path of energy and chemicals in the ecosystem.

36.1 Feeding relationships determine the path of energy and chemicals in the ecosystem I. Energy Flow and Chemical Cycling A. Energy enters an ecosystem as light. B. Photosynthetic producers, like plants, change light energy to chemical energy (organic compounds). C. Consumers obtain chemical energy by feeding on producers or on other consumers. D. Decomposers break down wastes and dead organisms. E. As living things use chemical energy, they release heat/


Ecosystems: What Are They and How Do They Work? Chapter 3.

they need, others get the nutrients they need by consuming other organisms, and some recycle nutrients back to producers by decomposing the wastes and remains of organisms. Living and Nonliving Components  Abiotic Water Air Nutrients Solar energy  Biotic Plants Animals Microbes Ecosystem Components Fig. 3-8, p. 45 Soluble mineral nutrients Producers Decomposers Secondary consumer (fox) Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) Primary consumer (rabbit) Producer Oxygen (O 2 ) Precipitation Water Limiting Abiotic Factors/


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