Ppt on prevention of needlestick injury

Environmental Health and Safety The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Basic Laboratory and Clinical Safety Training.

/bloodbornepathogens/index.html In 2001 the Standard was revised with the Needlestick Reduction Act which includes: Education and selection of sharps injury reduction devices (e.g., self-sheathing needles) Maintenance of a contaminated sharps injury log Texas Department of State Health Services Bloodborne Pathogen Control Prevention of contaminated sharps injuries, needlesticks Exposure control plan designed to minimize exposure of governmental entity employees to bloodborne pathogens http://www.dshs.state/


Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS) Bloodborne Pathogens For Tulane National Primate Research Center employees whose work.

pathogens Revised in 2001 in response to the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act Goal: clarifies employer requirements to identify, evaluate, and make use of safer, effective medical devices. Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS) How does / of all ages get hepatitis B and about 5,000 die per year of sickness caused by HBV. Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS) Hepatitis B Virus The average volume of blood inoculated during a needlestick injury with/


21/05/20151 THE WRONG END OF THE NEEDLE DR M G ASHTON CONSULTANT GASTROENTEROLOGIST CHESTERFIELD ROYAL HOSPITAL.

dark times especially on tx. Feeling of Isolation ;nobody really understands. I counsel needlestick injuries recipients. I have extensively researched all aspects of needlesticks, acute hepatitis c and chronic hepatitis /Needlestick is an emergency ;re HIV and PEP In random needlestick,you are 50 times more likely to contract HCV than HIV Ignorance, arrogance and complaisancy are the main obstacles to overcome in the battle to reduce /eradicate needlestick injuries. PREVENTION,PREVENTION and PREVENTION/


Types of study designs: from descriptive studies to randomized controlled trials Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD Associate Professor of Medicine and of.

most common reason given for not reporting such injuries among 126 of 297 respondents (42%). If someone other than the respondent knew about an unreported injury, that person was most frequently the attending physician (51%) and least frequently a "significant other" (13%). Conclusions Needlestick injuries are common among surgeons in training and are often not reported. Improved prevention and reporting strategies are needed to increase occupational/


NAME THAT STUDY DESIGN! Abstracts from the New England Journal of Medicine.

most common reason given for not reporting such injuries among 126 of 297 respondents (42%). If someone other than the respondent knew about an unreported injury, that person was most frequently the attending physician (51%) and least frequently a "significant other" (13%). Conclusions Needlestick injuries are common among surgeons in training and are often not reported. Improved prevention and reporting strategies are needed to increase occupational/


Observational study designs Alka M. Kanaya, MD Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology & Biostatistics University of California, San Francisco.

most common reason given for not reporting such injuries among 126 of 297 respondents (42%). If someone other than the respondent knew about an unreported injury, that person was most frequently the attending physician (51%) and least frequently a "significant other" (13%). Conclusions Needlestick injuries are common among surgeons in training and are often not reported. Improved prevention and reporting strategies are needed to increase occupational/


Types of study designs: from descriptive studies to randomized controlled trials Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine and of.

most common reason given for not reporting such injuries among 126 of 297 respondents (42%). If someone other than the respondent knew about an unreported injury, that person was most frequently the attending physician (51%) and least frequently a "significant other" (13%). Conclusions Needlestick injuries are common among surgeons in training and are often not reported. Improved prevention and reporting strategies are needed to increase occupational/


Observational study designs Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD Associate Professor of Medicine and of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of California,

most common reason given for not reporting such injuries among 126 of 297 respondents (42%). If someone other than the respondent knew about an unreported injury, that person was most frequently the attending physician (51%) and least frequently a "significant other" (13%). Conclusions Needlestick injuries are common among surgeons in training and are often not reported. Improved prevention and reporting strategies are needed to increase occupational/


Types of study designs: from descriptive studies to randomized controlled trials Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine and of.

most common reason given for not reporting such injuries among 126 of 297 respondents (42%). If someone other than the respondent knew about an unreported injury, that person was most frequently the attending physician (51%) and least frequently a "significant other" (13%). Conclusions Needlestick injuries are common among surgeons in training and are often not reported. Improved prevention and reporting strategies are needed to increase occupational/


Mosby items and derived items © 2008 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Chapter 12 Workforce Advocacy and the Nursing Shortage.

exposure to hepatitis B and C and HIV/AIDS  Use of safer needlestick devices reduces worker injuriesNeedlestick Safety and Prevention Act signed into law in 2000 Requires the use of safer devices to protect from sharps injuries Requires the use of safer devices to protect from sharps injuries Requires employers to involve nonmanagerial employees in the selection of effective engineering and work practice controls Requires employers to involve nonmanagerial/


BLOODBORNE PATHOGEN TRAINING

’s responsibility to keep up to date on feasible and newer devices that prevent needlesticks and other injuries to reduce the risk to employees. Additional Information About Safety Devices Available At… http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/bbp/#prevent [Device drawings courtesy of International Health Care Worker Safety Center, University of Virginia] Example of needle guard with protected sliding sheath that is pushed forward after use and/


Sharps Injury Prevention Program- “Make Sharp Safety-Priority ONE!”

adhesives, adhesive strips, staples, and adhesive catheter securement devices, should significantly decrease injury risk International Health Care Worker Safety Center, Univ. of Virginia 28 ADVANCES IN EXPOSURE PREVENTION—VOL. 7, NO. 3, 2005 References National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, “Preventing needlestick injuries in health care settings,”Publ 2000-108 (Washington DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, November 1999). U.S. EPINet, 82 healthcare/


Bloodborne Pathogen Training 29 CFR

apron Respiratory Protection Worn to prevent inhalation of airborne microorganisms, dust, & fumes. *Prior to wearing employees must obtain medical clearance & training, then fit test annually N95 PAPR Facts about Sharps Injuries Sharps Devices Associated with Injuries Work Practices Associated with injuries Statistics 600K to 800K needle stick injuries occur annually About half of needlestick injuries go unreported 38% of needlesticks occur during use 42% of needlesticks occur after use and during disposal/


Fainting and Anaphylaxis Needlestick Injuries Bryna Warshawsky, MDCM, FRCPC Associate Medical Officer of Health Middlesex-London Health Unit.

n Have instructions very handy n Always keep people in the clinic area for at least 15 minutes after vaccination n Advise clients of the “What to Watch for..” on the “After receiving the Influenza Vaccine Sheet” Needlestick Injuries n Prevention is most important: – Never recap the needle – Never put the needle down on your table – Put needle directly into the sharps container – Watch/


Bloodborne Pathogens Employee training on the hazards of bloodborne pathogens in the workplace Developed by Division of Occupational Safety & Health (DOSH)

needlesticks  Cuts from other contaminated sharps (scalpels, broken glass, etc.)  Contact of mucous membranes (eye, nose, mouth) or broken (cut or abraded) skin with contaminated blood Occupational Transmission Causes of percutaneous injuries with hollow-bore needles, by % total percutaneous injuries/up to exposed employee: At no cost Confidential Testing for HBV, HCV, HIV Preventive treatment when indicated  Test blood of source person if HBV/HCV/HIV status unknown, if possible; provide results to /


Principles and Practices of Biosafety Environmental Health and Safety San Diego State University.

Record Keeping Record Keeping Evaluation of Exposure Incidents Evaluation of Exposure Incidents Sharps Injury Log Sharps Injury Log Exposure Determination Exposure evaluation / Transmission of Biohazards During Work with Animals Direct Inoculation Needlesticks during injection/inoculation process Needlesticks during injection// or respiratory exposure to infectious agents during procedures Prevent spread of contamination Prevent spread of contamination Does not eliminate the hazard Does not eliminate/


2009 - 2010 Safety Fair House Staff Edition. Overview What is Safety Fair? All hospitals are required to provide annual reviews of safety and quality.

Environmental Safety 11 in your Handbook What is Patient Safety? The prevention of harm to patients using a system that… Prevents errors Learns from errors that do occur Is built on a culture of safety that involves health care professionals, organizations, and patients 11-/linens Bedside stand or over-bed table Food tray Floor IV pump 32-33 in your Handbook Needlesticks and Exposures In the event of a needlestick/sharps injury and/or blood or body fluid exposure: Wash the area with soap and water. Go /


Bloodborne Pathogens Employee training on the hazards of bloodborne pathogens in the workplace Developed by Division of Occupational Safety & Health (DOSH)

needlesticks  Cuts from other contaminated sharps (scalpels, broken glass, etc.)  Contact of mucous membranes (eye, nose, mouth) or broken (cut or abraded) skin with contaminated blood Occupational Transmission Causes of percutaneous injuries with hollow-bore needles, by % total percutaneous injuries/up to exposed employee: At no cost Confidential Testing for HBV, HCV, HIV Preventive treatment when indicated  Test blood of source person if HBV/HCV/HIV status unknown, if possible; provide results to /


Preventing Needlesticks and Other Sharps Injuries… Everything You Need to Know.

Be aware Dispose with care Sharps Injuries in the Operating Room Cuts/needlesticks occur in as many as 15% of operations –Risk increases with longer, more invasive, higher blood loss procedures Suture needle injuries are most frequent –Fingers used to manipulate needles and tissue Up to 16% of injuries occur while passing sharps Conclusion Preventing Sharps Injuries Your Role You are Part of the Prevention Process when You Adhere to/


FHM TRAINING TOOLS This training presentation is part of FHM’s commitment to creating and keeping safe workplaces. Be sure to check out all the training.

containers, self-sheathing needles, safer medical devices, such as sharps with engineered sharps injury protections and needleless systems) that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace.” Needleless Systems New/ appropriate engineering controls to reduce or eliminate employee exposure. This is an original requirement of the 1991 standard. The Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act merely amplifies and specifies this requirement. (Further discussion follows) “Where engineering controls/


Revised Bloodborne Pathogens Standard WAC 296-823 Safer Medical Device and Sharps Injury Recordkeeping Requirements.

medical devices Requirements to document evaluation of and changes in the use of safer medical devices Requires solicitation of input from non- managerial employees Requires solicitation of input from non- managerial employees Maintenance of a Sharps Injury Log Maintenance of a Sharps Injury Log Safer Medical Devices “Medical devices that have been engineered to reduce the risk of needlesticks and other contaminated sharps injuries. These include not only sharps with engineered/


1 Copyright © 2011, 2007, 2003, 1999 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Assisting in Phlebotomy Chapter 53.

rights reserved. Protection Against Needlesticks  Dispose of used needles and needle holders promptly in appropriate sharps disposal containers.  Report all needlestick and other sharps-related injuries promptly to ensure that you receive appropriate follow-up care.  Tell your employer about hazards from needles that you observe in your work environment.  Participate in blood-borne pathogen training and follow recommended infection prevention practices, including hepatitis B/


Managing Hospital Safety: Common Safety Concerns Part 4 of 4.

take to address safety concerns surrounding its use? Patient Safety Is the Responsibility of the Entire Multidisciplinary Team Preventable complications can be minimized through education and awareness of health care providers Needlestick injuries are a common concern within the hospital setting and proper practices should be applied to prevent their occurrence Improper use of high-alert medications may lead to unfavorable patient outcomes and best practices and/


Bloodborne Pathogens Employee training on the hazards of bloodborne pathogens in the workplace Developed by Division of Occupational Safety & Health (DOSH)

needlesticks  Cuts from other contaminated sharps (scalpels, broken glass, etc.)  Contact of mucous membranes (eye, nose, mouth) or broken (cut or abraded) skin with contaminated blood Occupational Transmission Causes of percutaneous injuries with hollow-bore needles, by % total percutaneous injuries/up to exposed employee: At no cost Confidential Testing for HBV, HCV, HIV Preventive treatment when indicated  Test blood of source person if HBV/HCV/HIV status unknown, if possible; provide results to /


Needles & Sharps Awareness

is a risk of infection from a range of diseases and blood bourne viruses. You may have heard of some types of blood bourne viruses. These include HIV Hepatitis B Hepatitis C What you must do if you think you have suffered a needlestick injury. Squeeze the wound/ or supervisor who will arrange for its collection and safe disposal. There are some things that you can do to help prevent yourself or a colleague becoming injured due to a discarded needle or sharp object. Stay alert – needles can be discarded /


Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (OII)

1904.7 General recording criteria 1904.8 Needlesticks and sharps 1904.9 Medical removal 1904.10 Hearing loss 1904.11 Tuberculosis 1904.29 Forms For the injury and illness statistics, Subpart C is the most important section of the rule, because it defines which/all or his or her routine job functions, and the employer assigns a work restriction to that employee for the purpose of preventing a more serious condition from developing. Step 4 – Meets other criteria? Job Transfer An injured or ill employee is /


OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH UPDATE 2014: EXTENDED CARE FACILITIES, SPICE David Jay Weber, M.D., M.P.H. Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics & Epidemiology Associate.

exposure prophylaxis, as medically indicated, per CDC recommendations; offer counseling Provide employee with results of evaluation with 15 days NEEDLESTICK INJURIES: MANAGEMENT State regulations When the source case is known, the attending physician or occupational/ 2013;34:875-892 US PHS HIV POSTEXPOSURE GUIDELINES: GUIDELINE EMPHASIS Primary prevention of occupational exposures Prompt management of occupational exposures Selection of PEP regimens that have the fewest side-effects and are best tolerated by/


CHAPTER 17 PHLEBOTOMY. Elsevier items and derived items © 2008 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc.2 PRETEST 1.An individual who collects blood specimens.

cont. b.Have a built-in safety features To reduce risk of needlestick injuries Elsevier items and derived items © 2008 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc.92 Plastic Holder 1.Consists of plastic cylinder with two openings a.Small opening: used to secure / b.Produces inaccurate test results Elsevier items and derived items © 2008 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc.177 Hemolysis, cont. 3.To prevent hemolysis: a.Store tubes at room temperature Chilled tubes: can result in hemolysis b.Allow alcohol/


Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences 1 Blood Borne Pathogens Training Yinglak Fuangmarayat Occupational Health Nurse 23 March 2010.

all blood as potentially infectious Use barriers to prevent blood contact Prevent percutaneous injuries Safely dispose of sharps and blood- contaminated materials Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences 20 EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN Written /Institute of Medical Sciences 50 Sources of Additional Information Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/hip/ Hepatitis Hotline: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis Needlestick!: http://www.needlestick.mednet.ucla.eduhttp://www.needlestick./


Needlestick Injuries National & EU Developments ANNETTE KENNEDY President European Federation of Nurses Associations & Director of Professional Development.

Needlestick Conference 2006 Why we need EU Action? 1 million needlestick injuries are suffered by healthcare workers each year (est.) 12 – 30% of incidents per 100 beds per year 60 – 80% of incidents unreported > 60% could be avoided Germany 1 out of 15 incidents involves Hepatitis C positive patients 500,000 needlestick injuries/Solutions National Interpretation & Implementation of Current Legislation& Guidelines Medical Devices with shielding Cost of Prevention Vs Cost of Treatment Key Messages National – /


Chair of Medical biology, Microbiology, Virology, and Immunology Hepatitis Viruses Human Immunodeficiency Virus By as. E.V. Pokryshko.

likely. Even in large hospitals, sterilisation and asepsis are often unsatisfactory. The use of disposable syringes, needles and other equipment should be obligatory. The danger of needlestick injury is present in medical and paramedical personnel, though the chances of infection are much less than with HBV. The risk of infection following needlestick injury or injury with sharp instruments used on seropositive patients has been estimated to be about one/


1 Occupational exposures to HIV: Prevention and PEP HAIVN Harvard Medical School AIDS Initiative in Vietnam.

occupationally HIV infected healthcare workers in the United States Type of exposureNumber of cases with seroconversions Percutaneous (puncture/cut injury) 48 Mucocutaneous (mucous membrane and/or skin) 5 /of recapping needles 21 Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Rationale: HIV pathogenesis: systemic infection does not occur immediately - “window of opportunity” when giving ARV may prevent HIV infection 22 Rationale for post-exposure prophylaxis 23 Efficacy of antiretroviral therapy Human data-CDC Needlestick/


The New Directive applying the EU Framework Agreement: Facts and numbers Gabriella De Carli, MD Department of Epidemiology and Pre-Clinical Research National.

:183-4. De Carli G, Puro V, Jagger J. Needlestick-prevention devices: we should already be there. J Hosp Infect 2009;71:183-4. Injury rate per 100,000 IV catheters 10 hospitals+1 regional system, SIROH 1999-2009 hosp11 1087443 CD637851419100541481518326373492307478192142184533199180 NPD20958131593034466433164440062473512106313108528 Rate per 100,000 devices An in depth analysis of NPD injuries in 8 hospitals revealed that accidents occurred: -before safety mechanism/


Ramona Bhatia, MD.  Tuberculosis (TB) ◦ Epidemiology ◦ Diagnostics and treatment ◦ Prevention and student health issues  Malaria ◦ Epidemiology ◦ Diagnostics.

place HCP at risk for HBV, HCV, or HIV infection is defined as a percutaneous injury (e.g., a needlestick or cut with a sharp object) or contact of mucous membrane or nonintact skin (e.g.,exposed skin that is chapped, abraded, or / Exposed health care workers should be advised to use precautions (avoid blood or tissue donations, breastfeeding, or pregnancy) to prevent secondary transmission, especially during the first 6–12 weeks after exposure. For exposures for which PEP is indicated, exposed people /


Epidemiology of Perioperative Bloodborne Infections UCSF Department of Surgery Grand Rounds March 29, 2006.

of worldwide cases of occupational HIV infection from this region 4% of global HIV cases are in North America/Europe –But 90% of worldwide cases of occupational HIV infection are reported from this region Needlestick Injuries in DC’s 90% global surgical need in DC’s WHO: 90% of needlestick injuries/–UCSF and ACS Epi Conclusions Suture needles cause the majority of injuries in the OR The OR lags far behind in prevention As surgeons we underreport injuries Risks to patients Risks to other members in OR Major /


PRE AND POST EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS IN HIV PREVENTION Kimberly Woodhull, PharmD, AAHIVP.

500 people have died of AIDS since beginning of epidemic  ~17,000 people died of AIDS in the US in 2009 Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Percutaneous Occupational Exposures  In 2004, estimated 385,000 needlesticks/year  40-70% needlestick injuries unreported  Risk of Transmission  HIV-/ Sept 2011. 7. Peterson, L., Tayor, D., Roddy, R., et al. Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate for Prevention of HIV Infection in Women: A Phase 2, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. PLOS Clinical Trials 2007:/


Occupational Safety and Health. Public Health Saves Lives Prevents Disease and Disability Improves the Quality of Health Care Helps Reduce Health Care.

the individual, public health focuses on efforts to assess the health of people in relation to their environment The goal of public health is to prevent disease and disability before they occur Linkages and Overlaps Public/Health Care/Source: “National Patient Safety Foundation at the AMA’’ Nursing View of Role of Health & Safety Sample: 4,826 Major Health and Safety Concerns Stress and overwork (70%) Disabling back injury (60%) Needlestick injury (46%) 88% cite health and safety issues as influential in /


1. 2 We serve the community by improving the quality of life through better health. Through its people Covenant Health will be recognized as the premier.

NEEDLESTICK/BODY FLUID EXPOSURE POLICY Policy Statement All work-related percutaneous (needlestick, laceration, bite) or permucosal (ocular, mucous membrane) exposure to blood or body fluids must be reported to Employee Health. CDC guidelines will be followed for assessment and treatment. Objective To prevent transmission of/ and visitor injuries 2.Engineering will assess for structural damage and report to administrator-on-call. 3.Depending upon the extent of damage, number of injuries and expectations from/


1. 2 We serve the community by improving the quality of life through better health. Through its people Covenant Health will be recognized as the premier.

NEEDLESTICK/BODY FLUID EXPOSURE POLICY Policy Statement All work-related percutaneous (needlestick, laceration, bite) or permucosal (ocular, mucous membrane) exposure to blood or body fluids must be reported to Employee Health. CDC guidelines will be followed for assessment and treatment. Objective To prevent transmission of/ and visitor injuries 2.Engineering will assess for structural damage and report to administrator-on-call. 3.Depending upon the extent of damage, number of injuries and expectations from/


Occupational Needlestick Exposures for Health Care Providers Presented by: Annette Nathan MD.

patient be tested? u Should the paramedic be treated? Needlesticks and Risks: Points we will discuss u What are the risks of HIV seroconversion? u Does it help to wear gloves? /volume of blood, solid suture needle, scalpel High Risk u Deep injury u Blood on device u Hollow bore needle u Large Needle u In artery or vein u Deep injury / u These drugs prevent to virus from manufacturing protease, an enzyme needed for the virus to reproduce u Indinavir- May cause renal stones, must drink 2 liters of fluid/day u /


111 LESSON 6 Safe storage of Sayana Press and safe handling of sharps.

the needle. Do not touch the needle. Do not dispose of used needles in anything other than a safety box. 555 Preventing infection Wash hands with soap and running water before and after giving an injection. Handle sharps carefully to reduce needle sticks. Always use a safety box. 666 Caring for a needlestick injury Right away: Wash the site with soap and running water/


UAW Health & Safety Department. CFR 29 Part 1904 Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

nothing wrong with the victim (who is complaining of pain, usually MSD pain), we just moved the worker to another job to prevent an injury Old rules, any change in job content as a result of a medical visit was a restriction, created / as the STS, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 log Recording criteria for needlestick and sharps injuries. § 1904.8 Record all work-related needlestick injuries and cuts from sharp objects contaminated with another persons blood or other infectious material (as defined/


Bonnie Rogers, DrPH, COHN-S, LNCC, FAAN Professor & Director North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Education and Research Center University of.

C, and HIV infections - from 2 million needlestick injuries/year  Hepatitis C and HIV - 2 of 20 most serious bloodborne pathogens  Hepatitis B - most common bloodborne infection - only one of three serious viruses for which immunization exists Women/Hazards, Protection, and Health Promotion “Improving the Health of Women in the Workforce”  Research and prevention strategies should be developed to document and counter the effects of sexual and psychological harassment, demanding (rigid, unpredictable) work/


1 29 CFR Part 1904 Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Revised 11/09.

in 2008. Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis issued the following statement: "Preventable workplace injuries and illnesses affect millions of American workers every year, many with lifelong effects. "While I am cautiously optimistic that these decreases in injury and illness rates /.4 Recording criteria –1904.5 Work-relatedness –1904.6 New case –1904.7 General recording criteria –1904.8 Needlesticks and sharps –1904.9 Medical removal –1904.10 Hearing loss –1904.11 Tuberculosis –1904.29 Forms This section /


Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2008 by Mosby Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc.

B and C, and HIV/AIDS  Use of needlestick devices reduces worker injuriesNeedlestick Safety and Prevention Act signed into law in 2000  Requires the use of safer devices to protect from sharps injuries  Requires employers to involve nonmanagerial employees in the selection of effective engineering and work practice controls  Requires employers to maintain a sharps injury log including the brand of device being used Blood-Borne Pathogens 45 Copyright/


VACCINE ADMINISTRATION “TECHNIQUES AND GUIDELINES “ from The Centers.

contact with potentially infectious body fluids or has open lesions on their hands. Remember that gloves cannot prevent needlestick injuries. Needlestick Injuries - should be reported immediately to the site supervisor, with appropriate care and follow-up given as/ the risk of injury. Equipment Disposal - Used needles should NOT be detached from syringes, recapped or cut before disposal. All used syringe/needle devices should be placed in puncture proof containers to prevent accidental needlesticks or reuse./


West Liberty Health Sciences

workplace and includes: Sharps disposal containers Sharps with engineered sharps injury protections Needleless systems Leakproof trash bags Resuscitation equipment Resuscitative Equipment/should not be more than 3/4ths full to avoid accidental needlesticks Work Practice Controls Procedures you follow to reduce exposure to blood / with environmental cleaning Prevention of Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections Perform hand hygiene immediately before and after any manipulation of the catheter Strict /


Occupational Medicine and Needle-Stick Injuries Cass Djurfors October 10, 2002.

Needlestick Injuries: Exposure is common: 52% of health care workers report at least one prior exposure, 24% within the preceding year Under-reported: estimates suggest that only 10% of exposures are actually reported US National Surveillance of / Guidelines 9Other considerations: For occupational exposures: WCB Physician’s First Report Employee Accident Report form #00169 Prevent transmission while in 6 month window period: Abstain from intercourse or use condoms Avoid pregnancy Discontinue breastfeeding /


Infections of Significance in Surgical Patients  Present by: Mostafa Ahani In the name of God.

transmitted efficiently through occupational exposures to blood, with the seroconversion rate after accidental needlestick reported to be approximately 2%. 100 To date, a vaccine to prevent HCV infection has not been developed. Experimental studies in chimpanzees with HCV Ig using a model of needlestick injury have failed to demonstrate a protective effect of this treatment in seroconversion after exposure, and no effective antiviral agents for postexposure/


INFECTION CONTROL – IT’S IN YOUR HANDS Infection Prevention & Control THE BASICS Hand Hygiene Rub-a Dub Dub Standard Precautions wet not yours… take.

INJURIES REACH FOR THE PHONE Transmission-based PRECAUTIONS Stop In the name of germs - NO ARTIFICIAL NAILS - CLEANSING HANDS - THE MOST IMPORTANT MEANS OF PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF INFECTION HAND HYGIENE Germs don’t have a chance with the proper use of/ -Other vaccinations - REPORT ALL INJURIES IMMUNIZATIONS, INJURIES & Employee Health If you have a work related injury, including needlestick or blood exposure, immediately notify your supervisor, & report the injury to Employee Health. Infection Control /


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