Ppt on nursing management of spinal cord injury

Medical Surgical Nursing Lecture 13 Neurology. The nervous system consists of: Brain Spinal Cord Peripheral Nerves.

Medical Surgical Nursing Lecture 13 Neurology The nervous system consists of: Brain Spinal Cord Peripheral Nerves Divided system – Central Nervous System (CNS) Brain & Spinal Cord – Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) Nerves (peripheral & Cranial) Nervous System Controls and coordinates all parts of the body By transmission of electrical impulses Purpose of the Nervous System Control Coordinate Communication Stimulation of Movement Purpsose of the Nervous System Maintains Homeostasis – Along with the what /


Introduction to Emergency Nursing Concepts

…release of inflammatory mediators…over time (can be a fairly short time) can result in SIRS, ARDS, MODS Assessment and Management of specific Organ Injuries Chest Injuries Spinal Cord Injuries Head Injuries Musculoskeletal Injuries Abdominal Injuries Chest Injuries Tension Pneumothorax/coma is final intervention when all else fails. Nursing Care for Traumatic Head Injury Airway, adequate ventilation and gas exchange, clearance of pulmonary secretions, proper head alignment, close neurological function/


NERVOUS SYSTEM DISORDERS

involvement) Bowel/bladder dysfunction (spinal cord) Constipation Depression and/or euphoria, emotional instability (disease or reaction?) Manifestations Cont’d Impaired mobility Tremor Pain MS disease involvement in brain stem will result in Charcot’s triad: Nystagmus (constant involuntary movement of eye) Disorder of Speech Altered muscle Coordinate & gait tremor MAIN GOALS OF CARE Multiple Sclerosis Reduce & Manage Symptoms Prevent Complications Provide Support Nursing Diagnosis Altered mobility r/


Linda S. Williams / Paula D. Hopper Copyright © 2011. F.A. Davis Company Understanding Medical Surgical Nursing, 4th Edition Chapter 48 Nursing Care of.

. Williams / Paula D. Hopper Understanding Medical Surgical Nursing, 4th Edition Complications of Spinal Cord Injury  Infection  DVT  Orthostatic Hypotension  Skin /Nursing, 4th Edition Spinal Cord Injury Copyright © 2011. F.A. Davis Company Linda S. Williams / Paula D. Hopper Understanding Medical Surgical Nursing, 4th Edition Diagnosis  X-Ray  CT Scan  MRI Copyright © 2011. F.A. Davis Company Linda S. Williams / Paula D. Hopper Understanding Medical Surgical Nursing, 4th Edition Emergency Management/


Conclusions: According to research; we see that the majority of patients in sample group have low degree of self-esteem. Young patients who have spinal.

has other beneficial effects, such as improved body image and self-esteem, and guarantees a good quality of life (QOL). Nevertheless, it is true that patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience physical and emotional difficulties in their daily lives, even when emptying problems are properly managed (Oh, 2005) Management of NB requires a multidisciplinaryor interdisciplinary approach. Patients with NB often suffer from psychological problems. Perhaps the/


Aortic aneurysm Dr. Aidah Abu Elsoud Alkaissi An-Najah National University Nursing College.

(large blood-filled bruise) bleeding endoleak (continual leaking of blood out of the graft and into the aneurysm sac with potential rupture) spinal cord injury Patients who are allergic to or sensitive to medications, contrast dyes, iodine, shellfish, or latex should notify their physician. Nursing Care of the client having surgery of aorta Preoperative Care Preoperative assessment must include detection of concurrent coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease Assess/


Nancy Pares, RN, MSN Metro Community College.  Identify pathophysiology and nursing process of selected sensory/neurological system alterations inclusive.

Metro Community College  Identify pathophysiology and nursing process of selected sensory/neurological system alterations inclusive of: ◦ Visual, hearing, retinoblastoma (covered in onco unit), hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophies, spinal cord injuries and systemic lupus  Visual disorders ◦ Myopia ◦ Astigmatism ◦ Strabismus ◦ Amblyopia  Visual disorders ◦ Cataracts ◦ Glaucoma ◦ Retinoblastoma ◦ Color blindness ◦ Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)  Otitis media  Otitis externa/


PRIMARY CARE AND CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT Kristin L. Kuhlmann, Ph.D., APRN, FNP-BC West Texas A & M University Assistant Professor, Graduate Nursing Program.

). Pharmacotherapeutics for nurse practitioner prescribers (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company. Types of Pain (cont.) Neuropathic- Abnormal neural activity due to disease, injury, or dysfunction of the nervous system Sympathetically mediated pain (SMP)- complex regional pain (reflex sympathetic dystrophy)- post-injury, triggering of immune response Peripheral neuropathic pain – post herpetic neuralgia, neuroma Central nervous system pain- phantom limb pain, spinal cord injury, post-stroke pain/


1 VENTILATOR AND SCI TRAINING 2 Payment of Expenses Please note that to claim for any travel expenses you must: Please make sure that you sign in. This.

gone very deep, skin infected, discharge means body is losing protein. 31 Spinal Cord Injury Prevention of skin problems Observation/recording Pressure relief Equipment Hygiene Diet/Nutrition Clothing [seams on trousers] checking groin area for men 32 Spinal Cord Injury Bladder Management No sensation No voluntary void Risk of kidney problems, stones Risk of infection Types of bladder management Supra Pubic Intermittent catheters Urethral Indwelling Conveen Risks 33 Changing the suprapubic catheter/


KATE BLACK KATE BRAZZALE LISA MOLONY PAIN. Aetiology Disorder/Disease Clinical Manifestations Pathophysiology Diagnosis Pharmacological Management Non-Pharmacological.

the action potential from the periphery reaches the first synapse at the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, a number of neuroactive substances are released. These include several excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and glial/the bed Cognitive/Psychological Possible Fear or Anxiety surrounding injury and healing process IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE Nurses role in pain management Administer pain-relieving interventions Assess the effectiveness of these interventions Monitor for adverse effects Be an /


Autonomic Nervous System 1. Function of the Autonomic Nervous System 2.

of ANS due to Spinal Cord Injury: Autonomic Hyperreflexia 133 Disorder of ANS due to Spinal Cord Injury: Autonomic Hyperreflexia Autonomic hyperreflexia is a dangerous condition in patients with high spinal cord injuries/ nondepolarized neuromuscular blockers NsgAssess/manage airway/breathing Assess/manage pain 158 Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors/acting formulations are available. 189 Methylphenidate Nursing Implications 190 Methylphenidate Nursing Implications School nurse may have to administer and obtain /


Emergency and Critical Care Nurse Licensure Examination Review.

shock may have warm, dry skin and BRADYCARDIA! Neurogenic Shock  MEDICAL MANAGEMENT: This involves restoring sympathetic tone, either through the stabilization of a spinal cord injury or in anesthesia, proper positioning.This involves restoring sympathetic tone, either through the stabilization of a spinal cord injury or in anesthesia, proper positioning. Neurogenic Shock  NURSING MANAGEMENT: The nurse elevates and maintains the head of the bed at least 30 degrees to prevent neurogenic shock when/


Alterations in Neurological Function Kim Martin, RN, MSN Instructor of Nursing HACC Fall 2011.

 Medical Management – Surgery If intact or leaking  Clamp using a metal clip  Wrap aneurysm with sterile muslin to stabilize  May pack with coils to block blood flow into aneurysm Detachable coil embolization If ruptured  Surgical repair of vessel suturing or grafting Spinal Cord Injury  Complete No motor or sensory function  Incomplete Motor or sensory only Muscle weakness Spinal Cord Injury  Level of injury Death from respiratory arrest Quadriplegia Paraplegia Spinal Cord InjurySpinal Shock/


PNS Disorders & Spinal Cord Injury Megan McClintock, MS, RN Fall 2011 – NRS 440.

Death can occur from circulatory failure, resp paralysis, or resp complications Tx – IV botulinum antitoxin, purge of GI tract Prevention is key Nursing care is like for Guillian-Barre Tetanus (Lockjaw) Spinal Cord Injury Shock Spinal Shock 50% experience this Decreased reflexes Loss of sensation Flaccid paralysis All below the level of the injury Can last days to months Still start active rehabilitation Neurogenic Shock Occurs due to loss/


neurological disorders

Meningitis: Nursing diagnosis Potential for injury: secondary brain injury R/T/of hair. Spina Bifida Meningocele Protrusion of the meninges. Meninges consist of: dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater covered by thin membrane No paralysis because spinal cord is not involved. Spina Bifida Myelomeningocele Protrusion of the meninges and spinal cord. Covered by thin membrane Extent of paralysis depends on the location of the defect. Results in hydrocephalus. Spina Bifida Spina Bifida: Prevention & Management/


PRESENTED BY SHERIN JOHN. PHYSICAL ASSESMENT General Appearance The patient is 25 yrs of age,male. He is conscious and oriented, with the following vital.

nucleus contains more water than the annulus. A compression fracture of the lumbar (lower) spine. There are different types of spinal fractures. Doctors classify fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine based upon pattern of injury and whether there is a spinal cord injury. Classifying the fracture patterns can help to determine the proper treatment. The three major types of spine fracture patterns are flexion, extension, and rotation. Flexion Fracture/


Review Physiological Integrity of Children Question and Answer.

nurse she and her husband are considering starting a family soon. What teaching point would the nurse include concerning the importance of dietary folic acid? A.“Folic acid will help reduce the chance of spinal cord/the client on right or left side A. Restrain the child to prevent injury to arms and legs B. Pad the environment around the chair C. / Explore the emotional aspects of this disease with the child and the parents B.Make sure the parents and child understand home management of this disease C.Help /


Nursing Care of the Adult (or anyone) experiencing shock Donna Roberson, PhD, APRN, BC Sharon Cherry,MPH,CNE Assistant Lecturer.

ACE inhibitors Keep HOB elevated 30 after spinal or epidural anesthesia Immobilize spine with injury Lovenox needed during period of inactivity and SCD’s Neurogenic Shock Occurs after spinal cord injury at T5 or above Massive vasodilation without /can continue to work Nursing Care Similar to pacers Reassurance – fear of arrest, fear ICD won’t work properly Sexuality Anxiety – patient and family Revascularization of the Myocardium Treats post-MI ischemia and failed medication management of CAD CABG, RIMA/


18 Common Chronic and Acute Conditions 1. Describe common diseases and disorders of the integumentary system Define the following terms: acute illness.

the right portions of healthy food. Encourage exercise. Observe resident’s management of insulin doses. Perform/and know residents’ favorite foods. Notify nurse of appetite loss/difficulty eating. If residents /of the following is true of spinal cord injuries? (A)Residents with spinal cord injuries will not be able to perform any self- care. (B)Rehabilitation is not helpful with spinal cord injuries. (C)The lower the injury, the greater the loss of function. (D)The higher the injury, the greater the loss of/


SPINAL CORD INJURY: THE NEW POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE.

of SCI Specialists (BASCIS)   Spinal Injuries Association (SIA)   Spinal Injuries Scotland (SIS)   International Spinal Research Trust (Spinal Research)   International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS)   Parliamentary All-Party Working Party on Spinal Cord Injury* *work under development   National Patient Safety and Modernisation Agency   Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee   British Trauma Society   British Orthopaedic Association   Royal College of Nurses   Royal College of/


Pediatric Neurological Problems Factors r/t cerebral fluid & pressure Blood brain barrier: BBB of fetus & newborn more permeable, allowing protein &

spinal cord because of developing bones and muscles. P.851 FIGURE 33–21 Brain injury can result from a direct blow to the head just under the skull where the initial impact occurs (coup injury). The acceleration deceleration movement of the brain within the skull also results in an injury where the brain strikes the skull (contrecoup injury). Clinical Manifestations of Traumatic Brain Injury by Severity chart Nursing Care of Head Injury/in meningitis. Management & Nursing care of Bacterial Meningitis /


Medical-Surgical Nursing Critical Thinking in Patient Care CHAPTER Fifth Edition Copyright ©2011 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Medical-Surgical.

the spinal cord. Next, the sensory neuron enters the spinal cord by the dorsal root and terminates in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Copyright ©2011 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Medical-Surgical Nursing: /Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, Fifth Edition Priscilla LeMone Karen Burke Gerene Bauldoff Behavioral Responses Self-Management of Pain –Useful information for the assessment database –Individualized and patient-specific –Get detailed descriptions of: /


18 Common Chronic and Acute Conditions 1. Describe common diseases and disorders of the integumentary system Define the following terms: acute illness.

the right portions of healthy food. Encourage exercise. Observe resident’s management of insulin doses. Perform/and know residents’ favorite foods. Notify nurse of appetite loss/difficulty eating. If residents /of the following is true of spinal cord injuries? (A)Residents with spinal cord injuries will not be able to perform any self- care. (B)Rehabilitation is not helpful with spinal cord injuries. (C)The lower the injury, the greater the loss of function. (D)The higher the injury, the greater the loss of/


TRAUMA (LIFE IN THE ER) William Beaumont Hospital

nurses have established two 16g IVs How about 2L of fluid and a type and cross for 4 units of/spinal syndrome is this???? Central Cord Syndrome Most common lesion and often seen in people with degenerative changes of the C-spine (=old) Hyperextension injury that causes the ligamentum flavum to buckle into the cord Results in concussion or contusion of the central portion of the spinal cord/of the internal organs and management then depends on the findings If the pt is unstable and you are unsure if the injury/


Chapter 13 Neurologic and Sensory Disorders

Toddlers especially receive blows to the head. Types of head injuries are discussed in Table 13-1. Copyright © 2012 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. Copyright © 2012 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. Head Injuries Treatment and nursing care ABCs (airway, breathing, circulation), assess for spinal cord injury, document baseline vital signs Level of consciousness (LOC) Record type and amount of any drainage from ears/nose Fluids are carefully/


Philip M. Ullrich, Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury QUERI IRC Philip M. Ullrich, Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury QUERI IRC Philip M. Ullrich, Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury.

Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury QUERI IRC Philip M. Ullrich, Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury QUERI IRC PARiHS Framework Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services Philip M. Ullrich, Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury QUERI IRC Philip M. Ullrich, Ph.D. Spinal Cord Injury QUERI IRC PARiHS Framework: History Features Proposed utility Application ExamplePARiHS Framework: History Features Proposed utility Application Example PARiHS Origins Royal College of Nursing Institute, UK Royal College of Nursing Institute, UK/


Trauma Nursing By: Diana Blum RN MSN Metropolitan Community College.

You are the triage nurse coming on duty./ is 102 degrees or less Management of Patients With Heat Stroke  /Spinal Cord Injuries (SCI)  tetraplegia (quadriplegia): paralysis from neck down  Loss of bowel and bladder control  Loss of motor function  Loss of reflex activity  Loss of sensation  Coping issues *Christopher Reeve is example of this injury*  Complete: spinal cord severed and no nerve impulses below level of injury  Incomplete: allow some function and movement below level of injury Causes of/


Chronic Pain Management

management. Lancet. 1999;353:1959-1964. Ascending Pathways C-Fiber A-beta Fiber Dorsal Horn A-delta Fiber Spinal Cord 10 Adapted with permission from WebMD Scientific American® Medicine. Pathophysiology of Neuropathic Pain Chemical excitation of nonnociceptors Recruitment of nerves outside of site of injury/ – nerve blocks Kinesiotherapy – pool therapy; activity Neurology – eval. treatment Nursing – patient care Physical Medicine – exercise; modalities Physical Therapy – exercise; modalities Psychology – /


NEUROLOGIC DEFICITS Nur-224.

testing, and treatment options for patients with brain and spinal cord injuries. Use the nursing process as a framework for care of clients with brain and spinal cord injury SPINAL CORD INJURY – (SCI) Involves damage to the neural elements of the spinal cord. Both sensory and motor function are often involved. Major causes  contusion, compression, laceration, hemorrhage and damage to the blood vessels in the spinal cord. SPINAL CORD INJURY/SCI A major health problem 200,000 persons in/


Project: Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative

area Can be from neuropathy, fibromyalgia, migraines or spinal cord injuries Pain Management Comprehensive approach to patient needs when experiencing problems associated with acute or chronic pain Pain Threshold Least level of stimulus intensity perceived as painful Suffering Physical or emotional reaction to pain Feeling of helplessness, hopelessness, or uncontrollability Pain Physiology Emergency nurses need an understanding of basic physiology of pain to effectively assess, intervene, and evaluate/


4 Body Systems and Related Conditions Define the following terms: Homeostasis the condition in which all of the body’s systems are working their best.

and Related Conditions Transparency 4-25: Care Guidelines for Diabetes Follow diet instructions exactly. Encourage exercise. Observe residentís management of insulin doses. Perform urine and blood tests as directed. Give foot care as directed. Encourage comfortable, leather footwear and/ or spinal cord injury should be repositioned at least every ___hours. (A) 2 (B) 3 (C) 4 (D) 5 4 Body Systems and Related Conditions Chapter Exam (cont’d.) 3.One way a nursing assistant can help with normal changes of aging /


(Relates to Chapter 10, “Pain,” in the textbook) Copyright © 2011, 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.

cerebrospinal fluid that continually circulates and bathes the spinal cord. The epidural space is a potential space filled with blood vessels, fat, and a network of nerve extensions. 85  Nerve blocks  Interrupt all afferent and efferent transmission, not only nociceptive input  Used during and after surgery to manage pain Copyright © 2011, 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. 86  Neuroablative techniques  For severe/


Using My HealtheVet (MHV) for Self-Care and to Prevent Complications in Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders (SCI/D) Frances M. Weaver, Timothy P. Hogan,

.gov Timothy.Hogan@va.govBridget.Smith@va.gov References Brillhart, B. (2007). Internet education for spinal cord injury patients: Focus on urinary management. Rehabilitation Nursing, 32(5), 214-219. Burkell, J.A., Wolfe, D.L., Potter, P.J., & Jutai, J.W. (2006). Information needs and information sources of individuals living with spinal cord injury. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 23, 257-265. Drainoni, M., Houlihan, B., Williams, S., Vedrani/


Emergency First Aid Nursing Chapter 24 Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.

nursing: assessment and management of clinical problems. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.) Slide 55Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Wounds and Trauma Dressings and Bandages  General principles of/ affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Bone, Joint, and Muscle Injuries Spinal Cord Injuries  Assessment Assess for paralysis. Test for sensation. Assess for abrasions and ecchymosis on the back.  Nursing interventions Take spinal cord precautions./


Care of Patient with neurological Disorder 2015 - 2016.

to reduce intracranial pressure. 7.Accurate intake and output must be records. 8.Protect patient from injury should as bed side rails. 9.Secure a tongue blade to the head of the bed for easy access. 10.Maintain normal body temperature. Nursing Management Stroke Stroke defined as: Disruption of blood flow in brain May be leading to death. Hemorrhage: bleeding in brain, blood vessel ruptures/


Emergency First Aid Nursing Chapter 24 Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.

nursing: assessment and management of clinical problems. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.) Slide 55 Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Wounds and Trauma Dressings and Bandages  General principles of/., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Bone, Joint, and Muscle Injuries Spinal Cord Injuries  Assessment Assess for paralysis. Test for sensation. Assess for abrasions and ecchymosis on the back.  Nursing interventions Take spinal cord precautions. Maintain airway/


Copyright © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Timby/Smith: Introductory Medical-Surgical Nursing, 10/e Chapter 11: Pain Management.

clients –Cordotomy Interruption of pain pathways in the spinal cord Percutaneous: Less risk; better tolerated by terminally ill clients Copyright © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Pain Management Nursing Management (Nursing Care Plan, 11-1, pg 110) –Collaboration with patient and physician –Nursing interventions for pain management –Monitor and manage drug side effects: Constipation, injury, nutrition, sleep –Client teaching Available pain management techniques Self-administration/


Chronic Pain Management Beverly Pearce-Smith, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Anesthesiology UPMC-McKeesport Hospital.

IMAGERY CBT World Health Organization (WHO) Analgesic Ladder. INTERVENTIONAL PAIN MANAGEMENT Epidural or Perineural injections of local anesthetics or cortico steroids. Implantations of epidural and intrathecal drug delivery systems. Neural ablative procedures. Insertion of spinal cord stimulators. Sympathetic nerve blocks. Treatment Goals - I Reduce and manage pain Decreased subjective pain reports Decreased objective evidence of disease Optimize medication use Increase function & productivity Restore life/


Pediatric Nursing Unit Eleven The Child with Altered Neurologic Status.

– Established by lumber puncture and laboratory examination of the CSF. Treatment: – Appropriate antibiotics. Nursing management: – Frequent observation to monitor childs response/of respiration, if present, is a late manifestation indicative of herniation. – Several other causes may lead to hypotension. They include intracranial hemorrhage, internal hemorrhages, spinal cord injury, cardiac contusion, and dysrhythmias with secondary impaired cardiac output. Head Trauma: Assessment of patient with head injury/


CRITICAL CARE OF SPINAL CORD INJURY Dr

CRITICAL CARE OF SPINAL CORD INJURY Dr CRITICAL CARE OF SPINAL CORD INJURY Dr. Amr EL-Said Professor of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Faculty of Medicine Ain Shams University Improvement just by overcoming challenges Dr. Foudeh & Kamal already discussed some of the challenges of pain management but when it comes in specific to the challenges to the use of opioid. No 1 is the fear of abuse and addiction and Dr. X and Y already addressed this/


Geriatric Rehabilitation: Does It Really Work? David X. Cifu, M.D. The Herman J. Flax, M.D. Professor and Chairman Department of PM&R Virginia Commonwealth.

nursing home Rehabilitation Efficacy: Common Geriatric Diagnoses §stroke §brain injury §spinal cord injury §Parkinsons disease §orthopedic §amputations §deconditioning [cardiac, pulmonary] §arthritis Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Teams §Interdisciplinary geriatric evaluation and management/Rehabil 78;1997 Arthritis Rehabilitation §Osteoarthritis affects 35-40% of older adults. §50 % of older adults have some type of arthritic condition. §Rehabilitation therapies complement pharmacologic and surgical /


Sharon Wood Clinical Nurse Specialist

= 3 Other morbidities Iraq and Afghanistan Head injury =1 Shoulder injury = 2 Fractured ankle = 1 Fractured ribs = 1 Dislocated hip = 1 Knee injury = 1 Limb amputations = 1 Blast/skin injuries = 1 Hand injury = 1 Internal abdominal bleeding = 1 Philosophy of Bladder and Bowel Management Preservation of Renal Function Promotion of Continence Abrams et al (2008) A Proposed Guideline for the Urological Management of Patients with Spinal Cord Injury EAU (2011) Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract/


Help Patients Take Control of Chronic Pain

, result in spinal cord injury, or require corrective surgery. To understand the benefits and risks of this therapy,/management and reoperation4,5 Kumar K, Taylor RS, Jacques L, et al. The effects of spinal cord stimulation in neuropathic pain are sustained: a 24-month follow-up of the prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial of the effectiveness of spinal cord/ tamethepain.com/painambassador Converse with a Nurse Program: tamethepain.com/nurse Medtronic Living Well Program: medtroniclivingwell.com/


Spinal Cord Compression: A Case Study Angie Angeles-Lo, SN, Kathy Berliner, SN Anthony Bodestyne, SN Lisa Warren, SN.

the spinal cord. External back or neck braces may be prescribed to reduce the weight borne by the spinal column and to reduce pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves. Spinal Cord Compression: Patient Medications n Dexamethasone- Management of cerebral edema/Rationale: Maintain good body alignment at all times to decrease the risk of further injury to spine. Spinal Cord Compression: Nursing Assessment n Assess for signs and symptoms of deep venous thrombosis due to activity. This can lead to pulmonary /


NURS 1400 Unit 2.

The relationship spinal column of the fetus that of the mother / Disadvantages Infection Injury Requires ruptured membranes /Nursing Management of Fetal Intolerance of Labor Normal FHR 110–160 bpm Interventions for abnormal FHR patterns Reposition the client Turn off oxytocin if infusing Increase mainline IV rate O2 at 8–10 L/minute Vaginal exam to rule out cord prolapse Notify health care provider Prepare to administer terbutaline Analgesia in Labor Medications Fentanyl (Sublimaze) Butorphanol (Stadol) Nursing/


Fundamental Nursing Chapter 14 Special Examinations and Tests

nursing assistance when performing a lumbar puncture or spinal tap. This procedure involves inserting a needle between lumbar vertebrae in the spine but below the spinal cord itself. The physician advances the tip of the needle until it is beneath the middle layer of the membrane surrounding the spinal cord. He or she measures the spinal/with a vial of local anesthetic. Gathering supplies promotes efficient time management. Make sure/ This measure prevents injury. Hold the container of local anesthetic so the/


Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing Behavioral Scenario for Competency 2.2: Foster Self-Management Christine Cave, RN MSN CRRN HFS.

patient’s wife to develop a teaching plan. The nurse can recruit resources provided by the hospital and from national spinal cord injury organizations to promote independent living. Key areas of spinal cord injury education include bowel and bladder management, skin care and pressure ulcer prevention, mobility and range of motion, and pain management. Copyright©2015, Association of Rehabilitation Nurses Path 2 - Proficient The nurse takes a seat beside the patient and his wife/


Help Patients Take Control of Chronic Pain

affects well-being, level of function, and quality of life May be caused by injury, infection, or ongoing condition/management and reoperation4,5 Kumar K, Taylor RS, Jacques L, et al. The effects of spinal cord stimulation in neuropathic pain are sustained: a 24-month follow-up of the prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial of the effectiveness of spinal cord/: tamethepain.com/painambassador Converse with a Nurse Program: tamethepain.com/nurse Medtronic Living Well Program: medtroniclivingwell.com/


Spinal Cord Injury Dr. Hassan Sarsak, PhD, OT. What is Spinal cord injury ? - Spinal cord injury causes a disruption in the motor and sensory pathways.

of the nerve 3) Neuropathic pain: central pain that originates on spinal cord and is thought to be the result of misdirected neural sprouting after the injury Pain People with SCI pain demonstrate activity limitation, lack of participation and depression. OT Role: 1) Thorough evaluation, pain management/working with this population must be comfortable with nursing procedures. These tasks include suctioning, manually ventilating the patient and proficiently managing the ventilator. 2.Providing the family and /


Steven Mardjetko M.D. A. Professor Rush University Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery Illiniois Bone and Joint Institute PedSpine.com.

, nurses, paramedical personnel) Protocol driven care: ABCDEFs of Trauma Care Immediate access to important diagnostic imaging: x-rays, CTs, MRI Sub-Specialty and Consulting Services available 24/7/365 Orthopedic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Neuro-Radiology Spinal Trauma Surgeons: Orthopedic Surgeons and Neurosugeons who have attained additional training in the evaluation and management of the acutely unstable spine and can treat pathology from Occiput to Pelvis!! Spinal Cord Injury Improving/


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