Ppt on new zealand culture dress

1 A Culture of Family Literacy Leads to School Success Jon Reyhner, BME 210, Week 1.

First emphasizes, was far down on the list (#41). 32 Mary had a little lamb. She spilled mint jelly on her dress. Mary had a little lamb. It was such a difficult delivery that the vet needed a drink. Mary had four dates and/ her experiences in recognizing and meeting the need for cultural relevance with her Maori students in New Zealand. I believe every educator and parent should read this book.” Sylvia Ashton-Warner taught Māori students in New Zealand and wrote about her experiences in her 1963 book /


Created by Capryce. My City and Country  City: Rotorua  Region: Bay of plenty  Country: New Zealand This is my city Rotorua form the top This is the.

school: I wear a grey black and mourn uniform  Every day: in summer and spring I wear shorts and a t- shirt or a dress in winter and autumn I wear a t-shirt, jacket and jeans/track pants. My school uniform Jacket and pants Shorts and a t-shirt / it is finished Music in my country Waiata’s Our National Anthem and Hakas and our top New Zealand stars are lorde and the band Six sixty A WaiataA Haka Lorde Six60 A New Zealand Cultural Fun Fact  Gisborne is the first major city in the world to see the sunrise. It/


* Agriculture & Pastoral Shows have been a part of the fabric of New Zealand life since early European settlement and have been through periods of huge.

our farmers play. * To increase the engagement and participation of young people in New Zealand agriculture, with a particular focus on metropolitan audiences. * To showcase modern and / in the link between city and country with a focus on heritage, culture, competitions and artefacts. Have relevant and current skill-based competitions * Competitions/other’s shows * Special events to be designed – showing workouts to music – fancy dress – teams of four over jumps – mini cross country events - a quadrille in /


Beyond a Billion Iwi in Aquaculture 2025 Risks and Opportunities Aquaculture New Zealand Conference 2009 Aquaculture New Zealand Ahumoana Aotearoa Whakatu,

Rangi 2009 Mihi Whakatau Chair – Harry Mikaere Proposed Law Reforms Iwi Aquaculture Experiences Hauraki Wakatu New Zealand King Salmon/Te Ati Awa Māori Economic Development Taskforce National Māori Aquaculture Strategy Next/of $1b by 2025 Potential is even greater Opportunities to apply for new space New Species Need to be prepared – first up best dressed Passive or Proactive investment Commercial and/or cultural priorities and outcomes Implications for Iwi Māori Commercial Aquaculture Claims Settlement Act/


Mothers and Babies Should Be Together. Carol Bartle NUMB Launch Hamilton, New Zealand April 2005.

babies (Beverley Chalmers 1997). The scientific and technological NICU requires a complimentary culture of caring for parents to add a much needed psychosocial element. Keeping/centre of my being, everywhere I go, everything I do, when Im waking, dressing, eating, whatever, it doesnt matter, hes with me, in my thoughts, in/Dr Kath Ryan & Dr Judith Duncan. University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. La Leche League New Zealand for all their support Ongoing support and inspiration from my friends Rea Daellenbach/


Sexuality, Vulnerability and young ID people in New Zealand : abuse, a hidden issue Dr Carol Hamilton Department of Human Development and Counseling Faculty.

. “It Doesn’t Happed to Disabled Children” Personal Stories Reports detail Cultures of Compliance & Practices of Disbelief Ableism - a (binary) value system/dressing - yet they are not taught to identify ‘bad touching’ in this context. Education, when offered, does not always match social realities or learning needs. Primary prevention efforts addressing societal norms, attitudes, and practices have yet to be developed. “It doesn’t happen to disabled children“ NSPCC. 2003. p.45 What is needed in New Zealand/


Identity and Cultural Change in the Colonial Era

Cultural Change in the Colonial Era: Education Many Western-educated people embraced other aspects of European culture as well: Dressed in European clothes Learned French or English Built European-style houses Got married in long, white dresses Education created a new cultural/ wish to see in the world.”  Cultural Change in the Colonial Era: Religion Religion = provided the basis for new or transformed identities Widespread conversion to Christianity in: New Zealand, the Pacific Islands, non-Muslim Africa, /


Costume Colloquium II: Dress for Dance www.costume-textiles.com November 4 th – 7 th 2010 Florence, Italy.

dress and costume, this multi-cultural mode of human expression, from a variety of practical, historical and creative perspectives. A wide variety of papers and presentations will provide participants with new and in-depth knowledge regarding unpublished research, new/the world representing 16 nationalities. Australia Canada Croatia Czech Republic England France India Ireland Italy Lebanon New Zealand Mexico Poland Russia Serbia United States of America The papers and presentations cover topics which will /


Lessons and Actions: Contextualizing Sexual Violence against Indigenous Women and Providing/Practicing Holistic Healing & Cultural Safety Responding to.

good food, homey atmosphere, and being well-dressedSchool inspection meant good food, homey atmosphere, and being well-dressed “Teacher’s pets” were given special privileges“Teacher’s pets” were given special privileges Small gifts were /New Zealand in response to the Indigenous Maori’s discontent with nursing care. The theory was supported by Maori people, as it upheld the political ideas of self-determination and decolonization. To facilitate culturally safe environments, those working in cross-culturally/


Ahakoa he iti, he pounamu

belongs to a particular cultural group is shaped by its beliefs, attitudes, values and customs. The concept varies from culture to culture. It also varies over time. ‘Gifted and Talented Students - Meeting their Needs in New Zealand School’ - Learning/cultural background. Explore various points of view and their validity in a cultural context. Provide opportunities that will allow characteristics of Maori (and other culture’s)giftedness to manifest. Go beyond window-dressing - show that the depth of cultural/


Option 8 Culture and Identity. Outline of Presentation Content of Option Content of Option Linkages Linkages Resources and activities Resources and activities.

South America; Europeans to Africa, Australia, and New Zealand; Europeans to Africa, Australia, and New Zealand; Africans to North and South America; Africans to/Identity) Spanish tradition 8.1 Populations (Expression of Identity) Greek /Spanish dress 8.1 Populations (Expression of Identity) European identity /where? 8.1/ an Expression of Identity Bosnian Art Costume as a Cultural Indicator New Boundaries New Boundaries (1995) 8.3 Culture and Identity A European Region Switzerland Switzerland Swissness “unity/


Session Cultural Environment Topic Outline Geography History Culture Social Behaviour Language Customs.

style meetings teams communication style women in business business dress code Comment on your findings. Word Count: 300 - 400 words National Culture Sub Culture Corporate Culture Cultures Geography & Culture Knowledge of a country’s geography and history are /always enforceable as new people move into executive positions (Chile, Mexico) Low context culture intentions are expressed verbally the situation does not change the meaning of words e.g. India, China, Australia, New Zealand Cultures across countries /


Rosemary Hipkins New Zealand Council for Educational Research Key Competencies: Challenges for implementation in a school curriculum Presentation to Onslow.

New Zealand Curriculum Relating to others Participating and contributing Managing self Using language, symbols and text Thinking THINKINGTHINKING R Hipkins 21.11.06 Aren’t these dressed up Essential Skills? Holistic - integrate knowledge, skills, attitudes and values. Demonstrated in authentic contexts and in interaction with others. Demonstrated when we adapt the competency to use appropriately in a new setting. Consistent with situated and socio-cultural/young New Zealanders, Wellington, New Zealand /


Identity and Cultural Change during the Colonial Era IN AFRICA AND ASIA.

people embraced other aspects of European culture as well:  Dressed in European clothes  Learned French or English  Built European-style houses  Got married in long, white dresses  Education created a new cultural divide between the minority who had /. “group unity.”  Offers educational experiences. Geographic Reach of Religions  Widespread conversion to Christianity in: New Zealand, the Pacific Islands, non- Muslim Africa, etc.  By the 1960s = about 50 million Africans had converted to Christianity Impact/


Culture Counts Power sharing in the English Classroom Alison Cleary Learning Leader and Te Kotahitanga Lead Facilitator Alfriston College.

film study project. Student responses The style of this video was almost parody like, with characters dressed in nothing but loin clothes half the time… I found the costumes quite odd as although /T. and Teddy, L. (2007). Te Kōtahitanga Phase 3: Establishing a Culturally Responsive Pedagogy of Relations in Mainstream Secondary School Classrooms. Learning Media, Wellington. Ministry of Education. (2007). New Zealand Curriculum. Learning Media, Wellington. Ministry of Education. (2008). Ka Hikitia (Managing /


Culture Regions Religious Regions Religious Diffusion Religious Ecology Cultural Integration in Religion Religious Landscapes.

. Sadhus come from all walks of life and vary widely in mode of dress, body décor and behavior. They migrate among holy sites in their quest/ the crescent moon are symbols of Islam. Religious structures Polynesian Maori communities of New Zealand Houses of worship reveal a subtler content and message Marae — structure linked to/Christians were all killed or driven away many decades ago Religious structures Catholic culture regions abound with shrines, crucifixes, crosses, and other visual reminders of faith/


Excavating Cultural Treasure: Indigenous Tattooing in the Northwest of North America Dion Kaszas Research Project INDG 203 April 11, 2011.

Colin Dale Skin Stitching. April 11, 2011. Fisher, Jill, “Tattooing the Body, Marking Culture.” (2002) Body and Society, (8) 4, pp. 99-107. Hubert, George/ Waimarie andMohi Rua and Ngahuia Te Awekotuku. “Renewal and Resistance: Moko in Contemporary New Zealand.” Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology 2007 17:477-489. Schwarz, Maureen /June 1999 5: 51-76. Peter, Albert. Nivisinaaq, Aivilik woman wearing a gala dress, Cape Fullerton, Nunavut. 1903-1904. Canadian Museum of Civilization. 01 April 2011. /


LINGUA INGLESE I, 2012-2013 V. Pulcini LAUREA TRIENNALE I ANNO L-15, CODE: LIN.0009 9 CREDITS, 54 HOURS LINGUE E CULTURE PER IL TURISMO.

Chapter 1, §4.1-4.10 MAIN POLITICAL AND CULTURAL EVENTS 1.English is the official – or main- language of many important countries in the world (e.g. UK, USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand). 2.English has been retained as the official language (/in the construction of people’s identities language contact nativization, hybridization, code-switching new coinages: been-to= a person who has spent a long time abroad; change-room= dressing room English as a foreign language Various options: - choose one of the /


Marketing in the “New” Economy Internet Marketing CRM Service Marketing International Marketing.

change Deep Culture.. the underlying aspects of a culture, i.e. values, norms, cause -effect relationships, views of the world, -- very difficult to change Definitions C U L T U R E fine arts literature drama classical music popular music folk-dancing games cooking dress language /likely to become a problem?  A: Italy and France  B: Ireland and Sweden  C: Japan and China  D: Australia and New Zealand  E: Hungary and Romania C U L T U R E Q9  At a business dinner in Korea, your counterpart’s wine glass /


What’s new… What’s easily forgotten… in Travel Medicine Elaine Rosenblatt MSN, FNP-BC, CTH Clinical Professor School of Nursing University of Wisconsin,

rape Avoid piercings Avoid piercings Safety and Security: Recommendations Dress inconspicuously Dress inconspicuously Leave expensive jewelry at home Leave expensive jewelry at/ Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, and recently Saudi Arabia, UAE, Tunisia and New Zealand Popular destinations include: India, Brunei, Cuba, Colombia, Hong Kong, Hungary, Jordan, Lithuania, Malaysia, / to cope with culture shock and managing personal stresses due to altered environment How to cope with culture shock and managing personal/


TOM PETERS’ LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP Kansas City 30 March 2000 (Day #90 of the New Millennium)

the Woman” Enterprise Reinvention! Recruiting Hiring/Rewarding/ Promoting Structure Processes Measurement Strategy Culture Vision Leadership THE BRAND ITSELF! Commander Kathleen McGrath, USN * U.S.S/What we sell is the ability for a 43-year-old accountant to dress in black leather, ride through small towns and have people be afraid of/ rise of the brand.” Gillian Law and Nick Grant, Management [New Zealand] Brand Defined Distinction Excellence Emotional “Signature” Trustworthiness Consistency Shorthand No /


TOM PETERS’ LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP San Antonio 28 March 2000 (Day #88 of the New Millennium)

of the Woman” Enterprise Reinvention! Recruiting Hiring/Rewarding/ Promoting Structure Processes Measurement Strategy Culture Vision Leadership THE BRAND ITSELF! Commander Kathleen McGrath, USN * U.S.S/What we sell is the ability for a 43-year-old accountant to dress in black leather, ride through small towns and have people be afraid of/ rise of the brand.” Gillian Law and Nick Grant, Management [New Zealand] Brand Defined Distinction Excellence Emotional “Signature” Trustworthiness Consistency Shorthand No /


Folk and Popular Culture Hindu Sadhu (Holy Man) Varanasi, India Insanely “Radical” Scot, with Kilt and Classic Surfboard.

Canada Dubai’s Indoor Ski Resort McDonald’s Restaurant, Venice Muslim Women in Traditional Dress at Indoor Ski Resort Problems with the Globalization of Culture Often Destroys Folk Culture – or preserves traditions as museum pieces or tourism gimmicks.  Mexican Mariachis; Polynesian/11. Ireland 12. Luxembourg 13. Costa Rica 14. Malta 15. The Netherlands 16. Antigua and Barbuda 17. Malaysia 18. New Zealand 19. Norway 20. The Seychelles Other notable results include: 23. USA 35. Germany 41. UK 62. France 82. /


UNIT 4 Dealing with Cultural Differences. Unit 4 Dealing with Cultural Differences PartA_1_a Language Focus Questions for Discussion 1.What do cultural.

Exercise B Unit 4 Dealing with Cultural Differences PartD_1_c 1. Japanese 2. Maori from New Zealand Movie TimeTime to Talk Movie Exercise A Word Bank Exercise B Unit 4 Dealing with Cultural Differences PartD_1_c 3. French 4. American/ riding swings, other cultures, may think differently, but Korean people, must find it attractive, different cultures, entitled to, their own likes and dislikes Movie TimeTime to Talk Unit 4 Dealing with Cultural Differences PartD_1_b1 2.monk dressed in orange robes, receive/


Work in A Socially Diverse Environment

New Zealand America Europe Great Britain – the United Kingdom Africa Russia So it is important you develop an awareness of their different cultural expectations Work in a Socially Diverse Environment WHAT IS CULTURE? It is a way of life! Culture is/ informality Verbal and non verbal clues Appropriate non verbal behaviour Food preferences General service expectations Work Ethics Dress and appearance Religious beliefs Customer expectations Touch and personal space Work in a Socially Diverse Environment Other /


Language and Religion: Mosaics of Culture

cultural hearth Dispersion - immigration Zionism - 1948 Variety Ashkenazim – (conservative liberal) Liberal – reformed 80%, mixing of genders, dress, language Liberal – reformed Ultra Orthodox (shepardic) Hebrew services, traditional dress/New Zealand, Oceania, South Africa Sub-Saharan Africa both present + traditional Ethnic barriers: Japan, China India Cultural hearth: not important today Christian landscape – Untied States 20 denominations = 85% of population Catholic Florida, New England, Southwest, New/


Međunarodna naučna konferencija Synthesis 2015 International Business: raising cultural awareness in Global Negotiating Msr. Jovana Gardašević Prof. dr.

context cultures like: American, Australian, English, English – Canadian, German, Irish, New Zealand, Scandinavian. 4.THE CHALLENGES OF GLOBAL NEGOTIATING IN THE CONTEXT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Non-verbal behavior subsumes tone of voice, facial expressions, body distance, dress, /starting from language and understanding, attitudes and beliefs, religion to the elements of material culture. The impact of the culture on international negotiating and decision – making is rapidly growing, especially in the time/


Elements of Cultural Diversity Dealing with Misunderstandings Work in a Socially Diverse Environment 1.

lots of destinations: Asia Japan Korea China New Zealand America Europe Great Britain – the United Kingdom Africa Russia So it is important you develop an awareness of their different cultural expectations Work in a Socially Diverse Environment 13/and informality Verbal and non verbal clues Appropriate non verbal behaviour Food preferences General service expectations Work Ethics Dress and appearance Religious beliefs Customer expectations Touch and personal space Work in a Socially Diverse Environment 17 /


Kangaroo Konnections Hop into Oceania!. In Oceania, you can visit many historical and famous landmarks in Australia, New Zealand, and Marshall Islands.

visit many historical and famous landmarks in Australia, New Zealand, and Marshall Islands. Sydney Opera House, Australia Waimangu Volcanic Valley, New Zealand Manjuro Bridge, Marshall Islands Total Length of the Trip to Oceania: 12 Days Sydney Opera House Daintree Village Sydney Harbor Bridge Great Barrier Reef Australia is a famous country for its world’s oldest culture and its natural beauty. In Australia, you can/


Chapter 3 Organisational culture. Learning objectives Define the term organisational culture Identify the components of organisational culture What factors.

of culture The aspects of culture that can be easily seen e.g. the way that people dress /culture influence business behaviour? Hofstede 1.Individualism vs. collectivism 2.Uncertainty avoidance 3.Power distance 4.Masculinity vs. femininity 5.Confucianism vs. dynamism (Time orientation) Individualism-Collectivism Peru Chile Italy Nigeria India US/Canada Japan Egypt South Korea France PR China Portugal Indonesia Hong Kong Taiwan Collectivism High Low Individualism High Low Australia Hungary New Zealand/


CALD Resources CALD Resources Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Supporting our workforce in responding to cultural diversity for NGO, primary and secondary.

(Hofstede, 1980) New Zealand Cultural Values The Migrant Journey Impact on Health Migrant Health Beliefs Accommodating Health Beliefs Accommodating is the willingness to consider the patients health beliefs and practices and include them in the intervention. Explanatory Models of Health Scientific Supernatural Humoral Religious Treatment Examples Rest Herbal treatments Meditation Acupuncture Scraping – Guasha Cupping Humoral Religious Influences in Practice Dietary requirements Dress & Physical touch/


MODERN ERA 1750 - 1914 CULTURAL TRANSFORMATIONS. WESTERN CONSUMERISM AND LEISURE Countries –United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand.

New Zealand –France, Germany, Scandinavia, Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Italy Increased production created demand –Popular consumption increases –What was once luxury is now necessity Increased advertisements by industry –Increased demand –Increased expenditure on luxuries –Product crazes arise Bicycle Sewing Machine Mass produced clothing Mass Leisure Culture/education Create a sense of nationalism Emphasis on speaking French, dress, etiquette, cuisine Actually accorded many colonials equal citizen status/


THE NEW IMPERIALISM IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. The British Colonies of India, Australia, and New Zealand Mughal dynasty in decline – regional leaders.

Company expanded its holdings in India, often by force or bribes. Company officials intrigued by native culture – Some took native wives and adopted Indian dress. – Some ruled as nabobs, or native rulers. Warren Hastings ruled the company 1773–1785, /in the early twentieth century co- opted local rulers. Revived Indian titles and grandeur, and created new honorary titles. Australia and New Zealand James Cook claimed Australia for the British in 1770. After American colonies gained independence, Britain began/


TOM PETERS’ LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP Philadelphia 21 March 2000 (Day #81 of the New Millennium)

the rise and rise of the brand.” Gillian Law and Nick Grant, Management [New Zealand] Part I: Forces @ Work Part II: Brand Inside Part III: Brand /“Year of the Woman” Enterprise Reinvention! Recruiting Hiring/Rewarding/ Promoting Structure Processes Measurement Strategy Culture Vision Leadership THE BRAND ITSELF! And Now … Kathleen McGrath! “What kind of car /!” “What we sell is the ability for a 43-year-old accountant to dress in black leather, ride through small towns and have people be afraid of him/


Navigating Cultural Spaces: Revisiting models of acculturation BRCSS Conference 2009 8 February 2016Shoba Nayar.

in occupations when settling in New Zealand?” Meaning of occupation Participants Grounded theory methodology 8 February 2016Shoba Nayar Navigating Cultural Spaces 8 February 2016Shoba Nayar NAVIGA TING CULTUR AL SPACES The Perspectives Working with Indian Ways Working with New Zealand Ways Working with the Best/ stayed intact with me. I’ve changed everything about myself, to some extent. I’ve changed the way I dressed, I’ve changed the way I speak, my accent has changed, the words and the content of what I /


CULTURE 6 TH GRADE Social Studies. What is culture? A way of life for people who share similar beliefs and customs. Example: language, music, religion,

Art Literature Dance Costumes Food preparation Celebrations & Traditions CULTURE BORROWING When a culture group borrows a culture trait from another culture. Example: The New Zealand Maoris press nose and forehead when they greet. When they choose to shake hands instead, they are borrowing a culture trait from another culture. CULTURE DIFFUSION This is when a culture spreads its knowledge and skills to other cultures. Ancient merchants, traders and travelers were major/


WEEK 1: INTRODUCTION TO CROSS- CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY.

study people from various background). E.g. : Psikologi Melayu (Abd. Halim Othman, ed, 1993), New Zealand Psychology (Sutherland & Beaglehole, 1940s) Etics, Emics, Stereotypes Berry (1969) – Etics – aspects of life that are relatively consistent/similar in different cultures – universalism principle. e.g. 1 st year students are wearing traditional dress, such as baju kurung to school or college/uni in Malaysia. Emics – aspects of life/


Industrialization: The New Global Age

develop, even though it lacked resources Canada, Australia and New Zealand also developed later New Industrial Powers Impact Social changes followed the economic changes Men/Middle Class Values Strict set of ‘rules’ for behavior (adult and children) Dresses respectably Lived in homes, apartments Even a small middle class home was expected / The Salvation Army spread both Christian teachings and provided social services A New Culture What themes shaped romantic art, literature and music? How did realists /


Changing Fate… Throughout history, women have transformed in many various areas in culture. In the 1800’s, 1900’s, and even today, men have been viewed.

able to see how gender roles of women have changed, and how women have altered culture throughout America. New Zealand 1893 Before Woman gained the right to vote in America, New Zealand women received their right to vote in 1893. This cartoon printed in the newspaper / of good prestige. Woman were considered the weaker sex both physically, and mentally. This painting shows the two girls in dresses and hats. Women were taught to keep a certain image at all times, in which this image shows. High Expectations /


Review: Holidays 1 Review by Ruth Anderson British and American Culture.

Ruth Anderson British and American Culture Review 1) What does the word "holiday" mean? “holy day” 2 Review 2) What is a New Year’s Resolutions? –/ associated with Easter? – Easter bunny – Eggs 6 7 6) On which holiday do people dress in costumes ? Halloween Review 8 7) What is the biggest holiday of the year in the/military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War? ANZAC day Review 17 16) What is Waitangi Day? National day of New Zealand Review 18 17) What do Americans/


A journey of a New Zealand transition from care to independence programme Presented by Amee Nicholson, Davinia Abbott and Sharna Cocker.

more robust approach, tailored to the needs of Care leavers in New Zealand required development INFLUENCES Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Dialectical Behavioural Therapy Attachment theory /to the needs of each Young Person taking into account their gender, culture, history, spiritual values, family structure, social and economic needs Transition takes/ to independence. Review ways engagement with the programme sought to re-dress the imbalances faced by care leavers Deliver feedback on how the programme/


Akaroa Roman Catholic and Dissenters Cemetery. Old cemeteries can be found in almost every older city and town in New Zealand. They are often found in.

areas of a cemetery were set aside for cultural groups such as Chinese and Jewish communities. Below: The soldiers cemeteries are special areas set aside for those men who returned from New Zealand’s war service. These are the returned servicemen/the information contains a photograph of David Swan and his embarkation records. http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/Cenotaph/locations.aspx Dress appropriately for the visit. Solid lace-up footwear for uneven and often steep surfaces is necessary. Warm coats, /


New Zealand Hotels and Travel Plans May 12 – 26, 2003.

New Zealand Hotels and Travel Plans May 12 – 26, 2003 Expectations  Three star hotels with private bath  Double occupancy  Light breakfast included each day  Chartered/  Princes Gate Hotel  Built in 1897  New Zealand’s leading “Boutique Hotel”  Centrally located  Overlooks Government Gardens 16/18 May Day Four 17.05.03  All day in Rotorua – dress casual  Agri dome sheep tour  Walking tours / hot pools and mud pools  Hangi group dinner and Maori cultural event  Pack to leave tomorrow Day Five 18/


New Developments in Renal Dialysis WH Seto WHO CC, Hong Kong www.webbertraining.comDecember 5, 2012 Hosted by Prof. Lance Jennings University of Otago,

2012 Hosted by Prof. Lance Jennings University of Otago, New Zealand Sponsored by WHO Patient Safety Challenge Clean Care is Safer / are commonly used for both conventional and high- flux dialysis which a good culture medium Potential transfer of bacteria from dialysate to patient blood Bicarbonate dialysate 14 Conventional/trained personnel care for the catheter Replace dressing after HD or when damp, loose & soil Disinfect skin with CHG for insertion and dressing change Ensure catheter site is compatible /


  . In the USA, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand,December,25 th is the most important holiday. Families gather on Christmas.

USA, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand,December,25 th is the most important holiday. /from December 26 to January,1.This is a cultural holiday, not a religious holiday with a principle for each day. Because people from many different cultures and countries live in America and Canada, there /to house to sing, and there are many concerts with music, singing and bells. Sometimes people dress in costumes and put on Christmas plays. The weather is warm and some people have their Christmas /


Cross-cultural awareness in the perspective of the education for international understanding 国际理解教育视野下的跨文化意识培养 深圳大学 高天明.

Culture: –People who hold power and people who are affected by power are significantly far apart –Vertical, hierarchical –E.g. India, Brazil, Singapore, Greece, Venezuela, Mexico, etc. Low PD Culture: –The power holders and people affected by the power holders are significantly closer –Horizontal –E.g. Austria, Finland, Denmark, Norway, New Zealand/Trousers Comment: In Korea, a woman with social status will generally wear dress or skirt. Women wearing trousers are generally common citizens of low social /


Teaching Cultural Competence

in 8 countries UK Ireland Malta USA Canada Australia New Zealand South Africa English in other environments Englishtown.com English /public service, skilled and manual workforces) wealth (income and inherited) regional cultures security institutions tradition and social change history, especially iconic historical personages and/the user/learner’s sociocultural competence Social conventions punctuality presents dress refreshments, drinks, meals behavioural and conversational conventions taboos length/


Assumptions of Culture

will. *i.e. We get confused when someone doesnt act predictably-murder, violence, dressing differently. There is variability in the sharing of culture. a. age variation-generation gaps. b. sex variation-males and females are different. / http://www.museum.upenn.edu/new/exhibits/online_exhibits/body_modification/bodmodintro.shtml Bodily Adornment: Tattooing tattooed chief at Taiohae, Nukuhiva drawing, 19th century Portrait of Tawhaiao Potatau Whero, a Maori chief, New Zealand, 19th century Tattooing comb, The/


Popular Culture. Popular culture –Consists of large masses of people who conform to and prescribe to ever-changing norms –Large heterogeneous groups –Often.

promotes a blurring of place distinctiveness Diffusion of Popular Culture Rapid Diffusion of Clothes –Characterized by income and job characteristics –Improved communication –Exposure to folk dress due to increased travel + television A.Jeans-know why/Santiago, Chile McDonalds Photobucket AmsterdamAthens Bangkok Netherlands Malaysia Estonia Krakow, Poland Netherlands McDonalds Around the World McDonalds New Zealand Kiwiburger - A hamburger with a fried egg and slice of beet McDonalds Uruguay McHuevo - A /


Do you know me? My name is Jin. My name is Jean. My name is Gene. My name is Jeanne. Presented by: David B. Hunt, J.D. President and CEO Cross-Cultural.

personality. Five Central Causes of Intercultural Conflict 1.Cultural differences. (Example: direct versus indirect communication styles.) 2.Assimilation versus ethnic identity maintenance. (Examples: language, dress) 3.Power imbalance. 4.Competing conflict goals. / Cultural Patterns across Conflict Styles Discussion Style North America e.g., United States ( White American), Canada Europe e.g., Netherlands, Great Britain, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Germany Asia Pacific e.g., Australia, New Zealand Engagement/


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