Ppt on needle stick injury infection

HIV Infection and AIDS Dr. Belal M. Hijji, RN. PhD May 25 & 28, 2011.

who does not or cannot be expected to assist in maintaining appropriate hygiene or environmental control in a private room. Otherwise, consult with infection control professionals regarding patient placement or other alternatives. 12 Postexposure Prophylaxis For Health Care Providers If you sustain a needle stick injury, take the following actions immediately: – Wash the area with soap and water. –Alert your supervisor and initiate the/


Slide 4.1 Topic 4 Infection Control Procedures a)Handling injecting equipment b)Reducing the risk of a needle-stick injury when searching a person.

Procedures a)Handling injecting equipment b)Reducing the risk of a needle-stick injury when searching a person Slide 4.2 To reduce the risk of being infected with HIV the easiest thing for any person to do is treat all blood and other body/ incident to the appropriate staff member 4.Record the incident via an appropriate reporting procedure 5.Seek medical advice If you have a needle-stick injury Slide 4.9 Wash the wound with soap and water If soap and water arent available, use alcohol- based hand rubs or /


© 2009 Delmar, Cengage Learning Chapter 14 Infection Control.

Wear gloves Follow agency policy Use biohazard bags appropriately © 2009 Delmar, Cengage Learning Injuries Report any cut or injury, needle stick, or splashing of blood or body fluids immediately Follow agency policy © 2009 Delmar,/ Cengage Learning Summary Standard precautions need to be followed at all times by every health care worker Observing these precautions can help break the chain of infection/


CHEST TRAUMA Sept 4/2003 Todd Ring Gord McNeil. Overview Approach to patient with chest trauma Approach to patient with chest trauma Pulmonary injuries:

-resonance on one side –distended neck veins –hypotension –tachycardia Needle decompression 2 nd ICS MCL then CT Needle decompression 2 nd ICS MCL then CT Pneumothorax on CXR Frequently/for occult pneumothorax: a prospective randomized study of its use. Journal of Trauma-Injury Infection & Critical Care. 35(5):726-9 Chest Tube Indications Traumatic cause of / traumatic pneumothorax. When is it safe? Am Surg. 1999; 65:1, 160-4. “Stick-em up!” 41 year old male, “minding his own business,” single GSW to R chest/


Safe Disposal of Used Needles and Syringes 1. Need for Safe Disposal of Used N/S Needle Syringe Exchange Programme (NSEP) is a major component of the.

, chlorine, bleach, betadine, iodine, or any other antiseptic on the wound 6 Contd… Needle-stick Injury – What Should One Do? Post exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) – Take antiretroviral medications as soon as possible after injury so that exposure will not result in HIV infection PEP should begin within 72 hours after exposure to needle-stick injury The closest ICTC from where PEP drugs are available should be contacted Treatment should/


Auricular & Scalp / Needle Technique Review ACR class 13.

3 months, it is contraindicated to needle the points on the abdomen and lumbosacral region. 1.3. Points on the vertex of infants should not be needled when the fontanel is not closed. 1.4. Don’t put needles on the areas of infection, ulcer, scar, or tumor. 1/heat the area for 5-10 minutes each time until the local area is red. 3. Moxibustion with moxa stick b. Sparrow-pecking moxibustion Holding a moxa stick with its ignited end directly above the acupoint moving up and down, like a bird pecking food. c. /


Chapter 13 Infection Control. 13:1 Principles of Infection Control Understanding is essential to all health care workers Provide a basic knowledge of.

become antibiotic-resistant When antibiotic-resistant, the antibiotic is no longer effective against the bacteria Nosocomial InfectionInfection obtained while in a Hospital setting MRSA Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus VRE – Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci Protozoa/accessible Waste and Linen Disposal Wear gloves Follow agency policy Use biohazard bags appropriately Injuries Report any cut or injury, needle stick, or splashing of blood or body fluids immediately 13:5 Sterilizing with an /


HIV/AIDS: Update for Health Care Workers Prepared by Infection Control Department Shands at University of Florida 1998 - 1999 Copyright 1998, 2003 Shands.

Notes: Significant Exposure n Exposure to blood or body fluids through needle stick, instruments, or sharps n Exposure of mucous membranes to visible / include postponement of childbearing, altering sexual practices, side effects of [preventive] medications, infection, chronic disabilities, loss of employment, denial of worker compensation claims, liver transplant, /that 600,000 needlestick injuries occur annually in the hospital setting alone n As many as one-third of all sharps injuries are related to the/


1 Natural History of HIV Infection in Children HAIVN Harvard Medical School AIDS Initiative in Vietnam.

Occupational exposure (needle sticks) Unprotected sexual contact with infected partner/s /infection (2) Two main types of injury caused by HIV Direct injury encephalopathy peripheral neuropathy cardiomyopathy nephropathy Indirect injury Immuno-suppression: opportunistic infections malignancies Immuno-dysregulation: Autoimmune: thyroid dysfunction, psoriasis 21 Natural History of HIV Infection in Children 22 Natural History Untreated HIV infection 23 Bimodal Progression of AIDS and Deaths in HIV-infected/


PBL 9 Dr. Tamer Bedair PREVENTIO N STRATEGIES INFECTION PREVENTION & CONTROL.

”) Safe injection practices are intended to prevent transmission of infectious diseases between individuals AND to prevent injuries such as needle sticks Safe Injection Practices : Why Quisque semper justo at risus. Donec venenatis, turpis vel hendrerit interdum/equipment can decrease the spread of these organisms to people. Our environment contains microorganisms that can cause infection. Cleaning of the Environment. destroy microorganisms and spores Sterilize kill or destroy nearly all disease-producing/


Disease Transmission and Infection Prevention Chapter 19 Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2005, 2002, 1999, 1995, 1990, 1985, 1980, 1976 by Saunders, an imprint.

1976 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 52 Maintaining Infection Control While Gloved Opening drawers and cabinets Opening drawers and cabinets Set up instruments,/Needle Sticks Never recap used needles by using both hands or any other technique that involves directing the point of a needle toward any part of the body. Never recap used needles/eye, mucous membrane contact, or percutaneous injury with blood or any other potentially infectious materials.” The BBP defines an occupational/


Chapter 19 Disease Transmission and Infection Control Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved. No part of this product may be reproduced.

into the body. This can occur through a break in the skin caused by a needle stick, a cut, or even a human bite. n To cause infection, the pathogens must have a portal of entry (or means of getting into the body/ 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved. Methods of Disease Transmission  cont’d n Parenteral transmission can occur through needlestick injuries, human bites, cuts, abrasions, or any break in the skin. n Bloodborne transmission occurs through direct or indirect contact with blood/


HIV/AIDS: Update for Health Care Workers

therapy - the current approach Halt the replication of HIV Prevent opportunistic infections Treat infections as they occur Maintain physical and mental wellbeing Antiviral Therapy Objectives Maximize / slide for definition Significant Exposure Exposure to blood or body fluids through needle stick, instruments, or sharps Exposure of mucous membranes to visible blood or/health care workers Sharps containers are to protect other workers from injury. The safety products are to be used whenever possible to reduce/


LEUKOCYTES (White blood cells) all fight infection BASOPHILS BASOPHILS –MAST CELL EOSINOPHILS EOSINOPHILS NEUTROPHILS NEUTROPHILS MONOCYTES MONOCYTES –MACROPHAGES.

anemia (lack of vitamin B12 or intrinsic factor) –Excess RBC destruction (immune disorder or infection) –Hemoglobin abnormalities  Thalassemia  Sickle cell disease  Megaloblastic anemia (pernicious anemia) More Causes/of edema: Edema means swelling anywhere in the body (including from an injury or from hanging your legs down too long like when on an /pressure on the heart. Treatment is to stick a needle in the cavity and drain the fluid. Treatment is to stick a needle in the cavity and drain the fluid. /


Infection control in the clinical laboratory. O Laboratory personnel are analyzed blood and body fluids that may contain infective agents from sick and.

precautions to prevent injuries caused by needles, scalpels, and other sharp instruments or devices during procedures; when cleaning used instruments during disposal of used needles, and when handling sharp instrument after procedures. O To prevent needle stick injuries, needles should not be / reprocessing or be placed in bags and disposed of in accordance with institutional policies for disposal of infective waste. 8. Scientific equipment that has been contaminated with blood or other body fluids should be/


Hospital Infection Control: Basic Principles

used sharp instruments during disposal of used needles when handling sharp instruments after procedures STANDARD PRECAUTIONS should not be recapped Sharps Injuries to prevent needle stick injuries, needles: should not be recapped should not / of cough inducing procedures. Known or Suspected Diseases or Pathogens Droplet Diphtheria (pharyngeal), Pertussis Meningococcal infections HI meningitis, epiglottitis, pneumonia Influenza Mumps, Rubella (postnatal) Mycoplasma pneumonia Parvovirus B19 Adenovirus (infants/


SUR 111 Suture and Staplers.

These ties can be loaded onto individually packaged “free needles” and these suture ligatures are called “stick ties” Ties can be packaged individually Ties can be on/Least reactive of all synthetic suture One of most inert sutures CAN USE in presence of infection Used for long term support of suture lines such as vascular surgery or mesh support in/ into the stapling device Care must be taken with these to avoid personal injury especially when re-loading Staple and clips are made of stainless steel or /


Soft-Tissue Injury. Sections  Introduction to Soft Tissue Injury  Anatomy & Physiology of Soft- Tissue Injury  Pathophysiology of Soft-Tissue Injury.

InjuryInfection  Most common and most serious complication of open wounds  1:15 wounds seen in ED result in infection  Delay healing  Spread to adjacent tissues  Systemic infection/ sterile  Occlusive/Non-occlusive Dressings  Adherent/Non-adherent Dressings  Adherent: stick to blood or fluid  Absorbent/Non-absorbent  Absorbent: soak up blood or/ excessive swelling or damage Needle or surgical cricothyroidotomy Anatomical Considerations for Bandaging  Thorax  Superficial injury can be deep  /


Safety & Health Hazards 2013

or apron…and gloves) Event of an Exposure If you are exposed through splashes, needle stick puncture wounds, or other sharps injury from any potentially infectious material: immediately locate a hand-washing facility & wash your skin/ new information for treatment and care become available. PREVENTION STRATEGIES: Aseptic technique helps decrease infection incidence Infection prevention practices including sterilization methods, operating room ventilation, surgical technique, and antibiotic availability CAUTI/


Infection Control, Bloodborne Pathogens, PPE TRAINING UMC.

night sweats, pneumonia Risk Factors for Acquiring HIV Infection in Health Care Sustaining a deep injury Sustaining an injury with a device which is visibly contaminated with blood Being injured with a needle which had been placed directly into the source / to protect one area of face, you need to protect all PPE – Disposable Gloves wear for phlebotomies, finger sticks, smallpox vaccinations, when handling specimens disposable, non-latex remove between clients, wash hands select correct size have readily /


PERSONAL SAFETY. SAFE WORK HABITS Unsafe acts are the number one cause of accidents and injuries on the job. You should get into the habit of working.

puts workers at risk for infection with bloodborne pathogens. The biggest hazard comes from workers accidentally sticking themselves with needles, due to either unsafe devices being used or unsafe or improper handling when disposing of the needles. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS Possible Solutions Nurses sustain the most injuries from needles and many injuries occur during disposal of the needles. The most effective solutions for preventing needle injuries are: Control Programs – determines which/


Workplace Safety This safety manual for Home Caregivers is designed to help you stay safe and avoid injury and illness related to personal care services.

consumers back. Bend your knees and lower the consumer into the wheelchair. 8 Blood Bourne Germs & Needle Sticks Needle stick injuries and other sharps-related injuries which expose workers to blood borne germs continue to be an important public health concern. Workers in many/ series of 3 shots over a period of time given prior to/or immediately after exposure to help prevent HBV infection. Clients should provide a blood spill cleanup kit. Any hazards should be reported to the Client. 9 Protecting yourself/


Protocols Involving MRSA Infection Lice & Scabies Tuberculosis Influenza HIV, Hepatitis B & C Presented By: Stephen W. Munday, MD, MPH, MS Sharp Rees-Stealy.

tested positive for anti-HCV antibodies and was diagnosed with chronic HCV infection. Her clinical condition continued to deteriorate, and she died 28 months after the needlestick injury [Ridzon et al. 1997]. Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Post-Test The average rate of HIV transmission from an infected source during a needle stick is? 3/100,0003/10,0003/10003/100 AZT has been shown/


Unit 13 Infection Control. Copyright © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.2 13:1 Understanding the Principles of Infection Control 

by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.71 Reporting Cuts and Injuries  Report any cut or injury, needle stick, or splashing of blood or body fluids immediately  Follow agency policy/ Copyright © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.72 Summary  Standard precautions must be followed at all times by all health care workers  Observing these precautions can help break the chain of infection/


Part F Blood and fluid exposure Exposure? Injury with sharp object. Contamination of open wound with blood or body fluid. Eye or mucosal splash with.

Injury with sharp object. Contamination of open wound with blood or body fluid. Eye or mucosal splash with blood or body fluid. BLOOD & BODY FLUID EXPOSURE Risks Prevention Prevention Action Plan Action Plan Risks Risks level of virus in blood of the source. route of transmission: per-cutaneous or mucosal. volume of infected/ Action Plan protocols All health care establishments must have protocols for dealing with needle-stick and other blood or body fluid incidents. Protocol should include Physician or M/


Unit F Infection Control. Copyright © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.2 Understanding the Principles of Infection Control  Understanding.

by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.74 Reporting Cuts and Injuries  Report any cut or injury, needle stick, or splashing of blood or body fluids immediately  Follow agency policy/ Copyright © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.75 Summary  Standard precautions must be followed at all times by all health care workers  Observing these precautions can help break the chain of infection/


Your Best Shot: Training Your Staff to Give Safe Injections

A safe injection prevents: Harms such as needlestick injuries Transmission of infectious diseases between patients and between healthcare / your supervision Have a mechanism to recognize and address infection breaches in a timely manner Examples of Investigations Related/ unattended in an exam room Pictures from Investigations Used needle Full sharps container Pictures from Investigations “Clean” Pictures / of hepatitis B virus associated with a spring-loaded finger-stick device. N Engl J Med 1992;326:721-5. /


From… the Hospitals social dialogue committee… to the “sharp injuries” EU Directive COM(2009)577 Council Directive implementing the Framework Agreement.

in practical terms, does not address the risk arising specifically from work with needles  Under the Lobbying from the pharmaceutical industries wishing to spread safe needle sticks ? EU Parliament’s concerns (II)  Resolution of 24 February 2005 on/address specifically the risk arising from work with needles  On 6 July 2006, Parliament adopted a Resolution on protecting European healthcare workers from blood- borne infections due to needle-stick injuries requesting the Commission to submit a legislative /


Goal Safety: 385,000 percutaneous injuries/yr in hospitals 1990 OSHA estimate: 9,000 bloodborne infections/yr, 200 deaths Laboratory acquired infections.

caused by BBP Hepatitis B Hepatitis C AIDS(HIV) Hepatitis B Inflammation of the liver Risk of HBV infection after a single positive needle stick is 30% Durable virus (7 days outside body) Acute or chronic More than 350 million people are /in lab! Exposure Incident Report incident to supervisor immediately and seek medical treatment! File Supervisor’s report of injury File Sharps Injury Form Report all exposure incidents to IBC Example of Exposure Control Plan http://capsnet.usc.edu/LabSafety/BioSafety//


Infection Control for Health Care Workers

common cause, contaminated needle-stick injuries. Blood or body fluid contamination of eye, mouth or mucous membranes. Blood or body fluid contact with non-intact skin, e.g., cuts, dermatitis, skin damage, etc. For more information on Hepatitis B visit the Hepatitis B (HBV) "Hepatitis" means "inflammation of the liver," and, as its name implies, Hepatitis is a virus that infects the liver. According/


Infection Control for Future Health Professionals.

20 Diseases from Bacterial Cocci Diplococci-gonorrhea, meningitis, pneumonia Streptococci-strep throat, rheumatic fever Staphylococci-boils, wound infections, toxic shock Bacteria – Bacilli Rod-shaped Occur singly, in pairs, or in chains May have flagella Ability/appropriately Copyright © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 47 Reporting Cuts and Injuries Report any cut or injury, needle stick, or splashing of blood or body fluids immediately Follow agency policy Copyright © 2004 by Thomson/


Advanced infection prevention training

July 2010 – October 2010 Analysis: No SSI identified since surveillance began. Action Plan: Continue to do surveillance and discuss prevention measures Needle Sticks Injuries in ER 2007 Needle Stick Injuries Advanced Infection prevention Class Comparing the rates Rate comparisons Some questions the Infection Preventionist may be asked to answer in regards to data are: Are the findings statistically significant Was the sample size large enough to demonstrate a/


Infection Control, DA103 Bloodborne Pathogens Standard 1991.

of employment Includes Exposure determination Details “infection control procedures” Administrative steps Implementation date /Stick Incident and answer the questions for credit Sharps Injuries All sharps injuries must be recorded in a Sharps Injuries Log Used to help employer and staff determine situations where sharps injuries might occur AND to make engineering and work practice control changes to prevent injuries Sharps injuries can be greatly reduced with a no-recapping policy for needles Needle/


Hospital Infections The Burden, Prevention and Control Prof. Abdulkarim Al-Aska Infectious Diseases Unit, King Khalid University Hospital.

therapy may reduce risk of progression to chronic hepatitis. Risk factors from case control study. Needle from artery and veins. Deep injury. Male HCW. Source ≥ 6 million copies/mL. Occupational Risk for HIV Infection Approximately 1 in 300-400 needle sticks injuries will transmit HIV. Chances increased with large-bore hollow needle Wash wounds and flush mucous membranes. Baseline HIV test, CBC, renal and hepatic tests Viral/


Precautions Methods used to control the spread of infection

Precautions Resuscitation devices 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Waste and linen disposal 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Injuries 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Used on ALL patients Includes: Needle stick safety Hand washing Sharps Personal Protective/


Infection Control Update

needle Deep IM stick HIV stage of source patient Gloves not worn Volume of exposure Type of body fluid with blood Lack of post-exposure prophylaxis The risk of becoming HIV positive after an exposure to blood is dependent on the volume of blood present during exposure. More blood is present with a hollow bore needle and transferred during a deep injury/of administrative leave and overall exposure management costs. Some general infection control practices when not at work Prevent antibiotic resistance Food//


Work Related Injuries among Hospital Workers in Iringa, Tanzania 2013 Godbless Lucas – FELTP Tanzania AFENET Conference 17-22 November 2013.

the path- Procedures, training, supervision – at a person- Personal protective equipments, procedures 2 Introductio n [2/2] Globally, injury from sharps – 37% of HBV infections; 39% of HCV infections; 4.4% of HIV infections Study of HCWs exposed to blood from HIV infected patients [1] – 80% had needle stick injury; 8% from sharp object; 7% from contaminated mucus membrane. Tanzania: WRIs accounted for 52.9% [2] Study was/


2.02 Understand infection control procedures Classes of Microorganisms 1.

linen disposal Waste and linen disposal 38 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Injuries Injuries 39 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Includes: Includes: – –Hand washing – –Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)   Gloves   Gowns   Masks and eye protection – –Needle stick safety – –Sharps – –Spills and splashes – –Resuscitation devices – –Waste and/


Biological Hazards in Medical Laboratories. This module gives an overview of how bacteria and viruses can cause injury, illness, disease, and even death.

live in a dry environment > 7 days, such as on countertop –Highest risk of transmission through hollow bore needle stick Virus Exposure – Blood/Body Fluids Hepatitis B, C, and D –Hepatitis B, active and passive vaccines available /with vacuum- tube device needles accounting for the largest number of these injuries. Other sharps injuries included broken glass from blood collection tubes and a needle for cleaning/dislodging debris in laboratory equipment. Reference: Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, /


Infection Control, DA116 Bloodborne Pathogens Standard 1991.

of __________ Includes Exposure determination Details “infection control procedures” Administrative steps Implementation _______ /Stick Incident and answer the questions for credit Sharps Injuries All sharps injuries must be recorded in a Sharps Injuries Log Used to help employer and staff determine situations where sharps injuries might occur AND to make engineering and work practice control changes to prevent injuries Sharps injuries can be greatly reduced with a no-recapping policy for needles Needle/


Types of Infections #1 PPP (5 days for PPP x7) 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Types of Infections #1 PPP (5 days for PPP x7) 2.02 Understand.

linen disposal Waste and linen disposal 78 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Injuries Injuries 79 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Standard Precautions Includes: Includes: – –Hand washing – –Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)   Gloves   Gowns   Masks and eye protection – –Needle stick safety – –Sharps – –Spills and splashes – –Resuscitation devices – –Waste and/


HLTIN301A Comply with infection control policies and procedures in health work.

infection control procedures: In Health care facilities the following guidelines should be adhered to in infection control procedures: National Infection Control Guidelines National Infection Control Guidelines State Infection Control Guidelines State Infection/direct blood contact – sexual intercourse, sharing needles, needle stick injuries, razors etc. Transmission can occur by direct blood contact – sexual intercourse, sharing needles, needle stick injuries, razors etc. Standard precautions apply Standard/


Infection control for house officers at the Omaha VA Medical Center Infection Control Practitioner Pager 13-485 ext. 3319 MRSA Prevention Coordinator Pager.

UNMC Hepatitis B vaccine at host institution All blood and body fluid exposures are important Sharps Injuries Needle stick Scalpel cut Pipette break Any injury that breaks the skin in the presence of body fluids Mucous membrane exposure If a Blood / Hepatitis B Antibodies may not provide immunity Up to 85% will develop chronic hepatitis 3.9 million chronically infected in US Sexual transmission uncertain Respiratory etiquette to prevent transmission Cover your cough or sneeze Deposit tissues directly into/


Complications. 2 Bleeding Bleeding during treatment (oozing around needle or infiltration) = fragile vessel wall or back wall penetration; don’t flip.

, PICC lines –Surgery to create AVF –Aneurysms  May be caused by the back pressure associated with stenosis –Needle-stick injury 15 Types of Stenoses Juxta-anastomotic (most common stenosis in AVF) Mid-access Outflow Central vessel Outflow Central-vein / quickly Necrotic tissue cannot be “fixed”—it must be removed Steal/ischemia places patients at risk for infection Infection increases their risk for hospitalization Hospitalization increases their risk for death! 29 Educational Goals Achieved Understand the/


Postexposure Care and Prophylaxis for Providers. Risk of HIV Infection after Occupational Exposure If 300 people receive needle-stick or sharp-instrument.

Postexposure Care and Prophylaxis for Providers Risk of HIV Infection after Occupational Exposure If 300 people receive needle-stick or sharp-instrument injuries at their job sites, from an HIV-infected source, how many do you think will be infected with HIV? 1 in 300 10 in 300 100 in 300 Source: Bell, 1997. Risk of HIV Infection after Occupational Exposure If 1000 people had mucous membranes or/


Risk of Transmission of Different Viruses Following Accidental Needle Injury Hepatitis B virus6-30% Hepatitis C virus0-7% (1.8%) Human Immunodeficiency.

and delivery personnel (Laboratory workers) What Is The Risk? Occupational Percutaneous0.3% Mucous membrane0.09% Sexual transmission0.018% to 3% Mother to child25% Infected blood products95% Antiviral therapy 1998; 3 (Suppl 4): 45-47 Types of occupational injuries Needle sticks, scalpels, broken glass Contact with skin which is abraded, chapped, inflamed or an open wound Direct contact with concentrated HIV in a laboratory Isolated/


Most common mode of transmission of pathogens is via hands!  Infections acquired in health care settings  Spread of antimicrobial resistance So Why All.

Precautions Includes: –Hand washing –Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Gloves Gowns Masks and eye protection –Needle stick safety –Sharps –Spills and splashes –Resuscitation devices –Waste and linen disposal –Injuries Used on ALL patients Used on ALL patients 84 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Bloodborne Pathogen Standard Applies to all occupational exposure of blood or other potentially infectious/


Most common mode of transmission of pathogens is via hands!  Infections acquired in health care settings  Spread of antimicrobial resistance So Why All.

Precautions Includes: –Hand washing –Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Gloves Gowns Masks and eye protection –Needle stick safety –Sharps –Spills and splashes –Resuscitation devices –Waste and linen disposal –Injuries Used on ALL patients Used on ALL patients 84 2.02 Understand infection control procedures Methods used to control the spread of infection Bloodborne Pathogen Standard Applies to all occupational exposure of blood or other potentially infectious/


Approaches to Common Pediatric Disease and Injury: An Emergency Room Perspective Designed and Presented by:  Thea Bachemin MSN  Jan Tatum MSN  Tina.

illness Have you ever had the flu? Supportive treatment, may need hospitalization (weakness and lethargy) Opportunistic bacterial infections Flu shots Obtaining specimen If suspected, droplet precautions! Spreads very aggressively (epidemic) Viruses evolve and adapt /Bone sticking out at an abnormal angle  Bone sticking out of the skin  Numbness  A pins and needles sensation if some nerves are injured  Inability to lift or rotate the injured part  Inability to put any weight (for leg injuries) /


Key Point Health Services 2005

Infection Control Key Point Health Services 2005 Why do we need to know this ? Exposures to blood and other body fluids occur across a wide variety of occupations. Health care workers, emergency response and public safety personnel, and other workers can be exposed to blood through needlestick and other sharps injuries/of liver disease (e.g., abnormal liver enzyme tests) healthcare workers after exposures (e.g., needle sticks or splashes to the eye ) to HCV-positive blood on the job children born to HCV-/


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