Ppt on muscle physiology

Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 17 The Special Senses Lecture Outline.

light Ciliary body –ciliary processes folds on ciliary body secrete aqueous humor –ciliary muscle smooth muscle that alters shape of lens Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e26 Vascular Tunic -- Iris & Pupil Colored portion of eye Shape of flat/the object will strike both retinas at the same relative point –extrinsic eye muscles must coordinate this action Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e49 Physiology of Vision The first step in vision transduction is the absorption of light by/


Unit 2 Exam Review: Musculoskeletal SYstem

brachii is to biceps brachii I can describe the critical role of the motor unit, neuromuscular junction, and acetylcholine (ACh) in the physiology of muscle contraction.   I can explain the role of calcium and the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the physiology of muscle contraction, and the role of the parathyroid hormone in providing additional calcium from the skeletal system.   I can articulate the steps and/


The Endocrine System Lecture Outline

ectoderm associated with the diencephalon (Figure 14.26). The thymus gland arises from endoderm of the third pharyngeal pouch. Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e Aging and the Endocrine System Production of human growth hormone decreases muscle atrophy Production of TSH increase with age to try and stimulate thyroid decrease in metabolic rate, increase in body fat & hypothyroidism Thymus after puberty/


The Muscular System- Histology and Physiology

Ca+ back into sarcoplasmic reticulum c. cross-bridges are formed and released d. power stroke ANSWER BACK TO GAME Physiology of Skeletal Muscle Fibers: $400 Answer These events occur during contraction except: a. exposure of active sites on actin b. active/ of Ca+ back into sarcoplasmic reticulum c. cross-bridges are formed and released d. power stroke BACK TO GAME Physiology of Skeletal Muscle Fibers: $500 Question List the events occurring at a neuromuscular junction in order. 1. ACh binds to receptors on/


Www.soran.edu.iq Physiology Behrouz Mahmoudi Muscular System 1.

Mahmoudi Muscular System 1 www.soran.edu.iq Lecture Outline Muscle Function Muscle Characteristics Muscle Tissue Types Skeletal Muscle – General Functions of Skeletal Muscle – Functional Anatomy – Physiology – Skeletal Muscle Types – Energetics – Adaptive Responses Cardiac Muscle Physiology Smooth Muscle Physiology 2 www.soran.edu.iq Muscle Function Movement – Depends on type of muscle tissue – Depends on location of muscle tissue Thermogenesis Protection Posture Maintenance Joint Stabilization 3 www.soran/


Chapter 9 Cardiac Physiology

Right AV valve Also called tricuspid valve Left AV valve Also called bicuspid valve or mitral valve Chordae tendinae Fibrous cords which prevent valves from being everted Papillary muscles Chapter 9 Cardiac Physiology Human Physiology by Lauralee Sherwood ©2007 Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning Heart Valves Semilunar valves Aortic and pulmonary valves Lie at juncture where major arteries leave ventricles Prevented from everting by/


Human Anatomy and Physiology

Recognizing Inadequate Breathing ALL Pale or blue skin Cool, clammy skin Faster respiratory rate Irregular rhythm Labored breathing Muscle retractions Infant and Child Anatomy Structures less rigid Airway smaller Tongue proportionally larger Dependent on diaphragm for breathing The/ when the left ventricle contracts Can be felt where an artery passes over a bone near the skin surface Physiology of the Circulatory System (2 of 2) ALL Blood pressure Amount of force exerted against walls of arteries Systole/


As soon as you begin to exercise your muscle cells increase their demands for oxygen (O 2 ). As exercise continues there is also an increased need to remove.

blood cells are produced Explain why it happens More red blood cells can carry more oxygen to the muscles Long term responses to exercise PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO EXERCISE Response Heart rate at rest Describe what happens Decrease in heart rate at rest /increased so the heart does not have to beat so fast to get required O 2 to the muscles. Long term responses to exercise PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO EXERCISE Response Ability of lungs to distribute oxygen Describe what happens More oxygen is absorbed into/


The Human Body: Concepts of Anatomy and Physiology, 3rd ed.

filaments to the sarcomere center, and contraction. In death, rigor mortis occurs as ATP becomes unavailable. Physiology of Muscle Contraction (cont.) Return to Rest Rest returns to the fiber when the nerve impulse passing down the / or fatigue. Contraction is autorhythmic, and thereby does not require an external stimulus. Physiology of Muscle Contraction (cont.) Comparing Muscle Tissues (cont.) Smooth muscle tissue (nonstriated, involuntary) Cells are small and spindle shaped without a regular arrangement/


Peripheral Nervous System

anterior to vertebral column Splanchnic nerve Blood vessels Collateral (prevertebral) ganglion such as the celiac 3 To effector Skin (arrector pili muscles and sweat glands) Target organ (in abdomen) (b) Activity 4 Locate the ANS chains in the models. Human Reflex Physiology Definition: Rapid, predictable and involuntary motor response to stimuli through pathways called reflex arcs. Two systems Autonomic reflexes (unconscious): digestion/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 8 The Skeletal System: Appendicular Skeleton Lecture Outline.

side) –head articulates with capitulum of humerus & radial notch of ulna –tuberosity for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e18 Elbow Joint Articulation of humerus with ulna and radius Ulna articulates with trochlea of /humerus Radius articulates with capitulum of humerus Interosseous membrane between ulna & radius provides site for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e19 Ulna and Radius - Distal End Ulna --styloid process –head separated from wrist /


Review Physiological Integrity of Children Question and Answer.

acuity and scanning ability.“ C. “Forcing the child to obtain toys from the affected side is basically a diversional activity.“ D. “This approach is focused on increasing muscle strength in the affected limb.“ Physiological Integrity of Children Developmental Disabilities 54. A newborn has facial features including short palpebral fissures, hypoplastic philtrum, thin upper lip and hypoplastic maxilla. Which nursing diagnosis related to/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 1 Chapter 15 The Autonomic Nervous System Lecture Outline.

neurons. Functionally, the ANS usually operates without conscious control. The ANS is regulated by the hypothalamus and brain stem. Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 3 The Autonomic Nervous System Regulate activity of smooth muscle, cardiac muscle & certain glands Structures involved general visceral afferent neurons general visceral efferent neurons integration center within the brain Receives input from limbic system and other regions/


Pediatric Fundamentals. McGraw-Hill 2002 Pediatric Fundamentals Objectives Growth and development Cardiovascular physiology Respiratory physiology including.

cavity Endodermal part develops into airway alveolar membranes glands Mesenchymal elements develop into smooth muscle cartilage connective tissue vessels Pediatric Respiratory Physiology Pseudoglandular period – starting 17 th week of gestation Branching of airways down to / ml/kg by age 5 may be only 15% of TLC in young infants under GA plus muscle relaxants Pediatric Respiratory Physiology – Lung Volumes and Mechanics of Breathing Elastic properties, compliance and FRC Neonate chest wall compliance, C/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 14 Part 1 The Brain and Cranial Nerves Lecture Outline.

sensory info to the cerebellum Cranial nerves 5 through 7 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e31 VII = Facial Nerve Motor portion –facial muscles –salivary & nasal and oral mucous glands & tears Sensory portion –taste buds on /2/3’s of tongue Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e32 VI = Abducens Nerve Lateral rectus eye muscle Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e33 V = Trigeminal Nerve Motor portion –muscles of mastication Sensory portion –touch, pain, & temperature receptors/


Muscular Histology and Physiology. Human Anatomy and Physiology, 7e by Elaine Marieb & Katja Hoehn Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing.

sarcolemma at motor end plate Part of a myofibril Mitochondrion Synaptic cleft T tubule Synaptic vesicle Ca 2+ Muscle Contraction Physiology Human Anatomy and Physiology, 7e by Elaine Marieb & Katja Hoehn Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings./SR Tropomyosin blockage restored, blocking myosin binding sites onactin; contraction ends and muscle fiber relaxes. Ca 2+ 1 2 6 5 4 3 Human Anatomy and Physiology, 7e by Elaine Marieb & Katja Hoehn Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education,/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 1 Chapter 14 Part 1 The Brain and Cranial Nerves Lecture Outline.

sensory info to the cerebellum Cranial nerves 5 through 7 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 32 VII = Facial Nerve Motor portion facial muscles salivary & nasal and oral mucous glands & tears Sensory portion taste buds on anterior /2/3’s of tongue Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 33 VI = Abducens Nerve Lateral rectus eye muscle Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 34 V = Trigeminal Nerve Motor portion muscles of mastication Sensory portion touch, pain, & temperature /


General physiology of excitative tissue. Physiology of muscles and nerves. Features of functioning of muscles cranial facial area.

tissue. Physiology of muscles and nerves. Features of functioning of muscles cranial facial area. DETERMINATION OF “PHYSIOLOGY” NOTION. PHYSIOLOGICAL SUBJECTS Physiology is the science about the regularities of organisms‘ vital activity in connection with the external environment PHYSIOLOGICAL SUBJECTS 1. Aged physiology 2. Clinical physiology. 3. Physiology of labor. 4. Psychophysiology. 5. Ecological physiology. 6. Physiology of sport. 7. Space physiology. 8. Pathologic physiology. Methods of physiology a/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 8 The Skeletal System: Appendicular Skeleton Lecture Outline.

side) –head articulates with capitulum of humerus & radial notch of ulna –tuberosity for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e18 Elbow Joint Articulation of humerus with ulna and radius Ulna articulates with trochlea of /humerus Radius articulates with capitulum of humerus Interosseous membrane between ulna & radius provides site for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e19 Ulna and Radius - Distal End Ulna --styloid process –head separated from wrist /


Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance, Sixth Edition.

, Sixth Edition Tension Characteristics Gradation of force –Number of motor units recruited –Discharge frequency –Neuromuscular fatigue Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance, Sixth Edition Receptors in Muscles, Joints, and Tendons: The Proprioceptors Proprioceptors relay information about muscular dynamics and limb movement. Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise/


Anatomy, Physiology, & Disease An Interactive Journey for Health Professionals Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.

Walls of the Alimentary Canal (cont’d) Next layer called muscularis externa, composed of two layers of smooth muscle Anatomy, Physiology, and Disease: An Interactive Journey for Health Professionals Bruce J. Colbert, Jeff E. Ankney, and Karen T/ rights reserved. Stomach (cont’d) Works food toward pyloric sphincter through peristaltic activity of muscles Both chemical and physical digestion occurs here Anatomy, Physiology, and Disease: An Interactive Journey for Health Professionals Bruce J. Colbert, Jeff E. /


Human Physiology by Lauralee Sherwood ©2007 Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning Chapter 13 The Respiratory System Presented by Dr. Mohammad Alqudah Department.

by a gas varies inversely with the volume of a gas. Boyle’s Law Chapter 13 The Respiratory System Human Physiology by Lauralee Sherwood ©2007 Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning Respiratory Mechanics Major inspiratory muscles –Diaphragm Major inspiratory muscle Innervated by phrenic nerve –External intercostal muscles Activated by intercostal nerves 75 % of the enlargement of the thoracic cavity during quiet respiration is due to the/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 8 The Skeletal System: Appendicular Skeleton Lecture Outline.

side) –head articulates with capitulum of humerus & radial notch of ulna –tuberosity for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e18 Elbow Joint Articulation of humerus with ulna and radius Ulna articulates with trochlea of /humerus Radius articulates with capitulum of humerus Interosseous membrane between ulna & radius provides site for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e19 Ulna and Radius - Distal End Ulna --styloid process –head separated from wrist /


CHIROPRACTIC PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS COURSE # 7121 DR. GRANT.

together until they fuse into a smooth, tetanized contraction. u The frequency at which this fusion occurs in most cases will be between 15 and 30 pps, varying with the muscle selected Physiologic Effects H Generally, therapeutic electricity has been used for the maintenance or gain of muscular strength, relief of pain, reduction of edema, delivery of medication transcutaneously, and healing of/


11 Anatomy and Physiology. 12 Lesson Objectives After this lesson students will be able to: Explain the relationship and function of : Cells Tissues Primary.

more bones are joined together The Skeletal System Chapter 3.2 Anatomy and Physiology Basic Body Systems 124 Functions of the Skeletal System Support-gives shape & strength Surround & protect- Internal organs Frame- Muscles are attached Movement 125 The Skull or the Cranium 8 Bones –Frontal-/of the body is known as a ______. Chapter 3.1 Anatomy and Physiology Building Blocks of the Human Body 137 Building Blocks of the Body Self-Check 1. T or F Muscles are the basic units of living matter. 2. T or F The/


Bio 211- Anatomy and Physiology I Today’s topics Muscular system.

sure to understand and remember which steps in the entire process require ATP, ACh, or Ca 2+ !!!!!! Bio 211- Anatomy and Physiology I Today’s topics Muscular system Action potential and muscle physiology animations Action potential at Neuromuscular junction Action potentials and muscle contraction Crossbridge formation and contraction contraction of the sarcomere What factors are needed and when??? Ca 2+ ACh ATP ACh release/


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 8 The Skeletal System: Appendicular Skeleton Lecture Outline.

side) –head articulates with capitulum of humerus & radial notch of ulna –tuberosity for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e18 Elbow Joint Articulation of humerus with ulna and radius Ulna articulates with trochlea of /humerus Radius articulates with capitulum of humerus Interosseous membrane between ulna & radius provides site for muscle attachment Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e19 Ulna and Radius - Distal End Ulna --styloid process –head separated from wrist /


Mosby’s Essential Sciences for Therapeutic Massage

the horizontal plane and oriented forward. 30 Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 30 Cardiac Muscle ● What is another named for cardiac muscle? Striated involuntary muscle. From Thibodeau GA, Patton KT: Anatomy and physiology, ed 5, St. Louis, 2003, Mosby. 31 Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 31/


Muscle.

from the SR excitation propagating on the sarcolemma is conducted to the SR by T-tubules invaginating at the level of z-disks Tubules in the muscle fiber 10/20 Tubules in the muscle fiber Eckert: Animal Physiology, W.H.Freeman and Co., N.Y.,2000, Fig. 10-21. Connection of T-tubules and SR 11/20 Connection of T-tubules and SR/


Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance, Sixth Edition.

-up –Unrelated movements Specific warm-up –Sport-specific movements Psychologic considerations –Athletes feel better prepared Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance, Sixth Edition Warm-Up (Preliminary Exercise) Physiologic considerations –Faster muscle contraction and relaxation –Greater movement economy from lowered viscous resistance –Facilitated oxygen delivery—Bohr effect –Facilitated nerve transmission and/


Head, Facial, & Neck Trauma

Cranial Nerves CN-XII (Hypoglossal) Swallowing & tongue movement CN-IX (Glossopharyngeal) Saliva production & taste CN-V (Trigeminal) Sensations from facial region & aids in chewing CN-VII (Facial) Muscles of facial expression & taste Anatomy & Physiology of the Face Pharynx Posterior & Inferior to the oral cavity Aids in swallowing Bolus of food propelled back & down by tongue Epiglottis moves downward Larynx moves up Combined/


Muscles and Muscle Tissue

phosphate): Rapid source of renewal of ATP. ADP combines with creatine phosphate. [Phosphocreatine] is 3 times [ATP]. Ready source of high-energy phosphate. Muscle fatigue occurs when: Muscle fatigue – the muscle is in a state of physiological inability to contract Muscle fatigue occurs when: ATP production fails to keep pace with ATP use There is a relative deficit of ATP, causing contractures Lactic acid accumulates/


Chapter 15: Special Senses.

Cytoplasm George Wald 1906 – 1997 received the Nobel Prize in 1967 for discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye Figure 15.1a: The eye and associated accessory structures, / eye muscles, p. 559. Trochlea Superior oblique muscle Superior oblique tendon Superior rectus muscle Axis at center of eye Lateral rectus muscle Conjunctiva Inferior rectus muscle Medial rectus muscle Lateral rectus muscle Optic nerve Inferior rectus muscle Inferior oblique muscle Annular /


Chapter 16 The Digestive System

– specialized for absorbing digestive nutrients Lamina propria Houses gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) Important in defense against disease-causing intestinal bacteria Muscularis mucosa Sparse layer of smooth muscle Chapter 16 The Digestive System Human Physiology by Lauralee Sherwood ©2007 Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning Submucosa Thick layer of connective tissue Provides digestive tract with distensibility and elasticity Contains larger blood and lymph vessels/


Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Benjamin Cummings C h a p t e r 1 An Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology.

the microscope (Microanatomy). –We can divide microanatomy into: »Histology – study of tissues »Cytology – study of individual cells. PhysiologyPhysiology is defined as the study of function – so human physiology attempts to explain how and why humans function.  Physiology is where we figure out how stuff works.  How do muscles contract?  How do we run?  How does our heart beat? Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing/


Skeletal Muscle Physiology Susan V. Brooks Herzog Department of Physiology University of Michigan.

Skeletal Muscle Physiology Susan V. Brooks Herzog Department of Physiology University of Michigan Muscle Muscle fibers Muscle fiber Myofibril Sarcomere Modified from McMahon, Muscles, Reflexes and Locomotion Princeton University Press, 1984. A little less than half of the body’s mass is composed of skeletal muscle, with most muscles linked to bones by tendons through which the forces and movements developed during contractions are transmitted to the skeleton. Structural hierarchy/


Muscle Types and Physiology  Types and Characteristics of MuscleMuscle Function and Types  Microscopic Anatomy of Muscle  Muscular Stimulation 

(fatigable) fibers: “fast twitch” or “white meat” Predominance of slow oxidative (fatigue-resistant) fibers: “slow twitch” or dark meat Small load Contractile velocity Contractile duration Muscle Types and Physiology  Types and Characteristics of MuscleMuscle Function and Types  Microscopic Anatomy of Muscle  Muscular Stimulation  Muscular Contraction Mechanism  Muscular Response Based on Stimulus  Energy Sources for Muscular Contraction  Types of Muscular Contractions  Effects of Exercise on/


Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance, Sixth Edition.

ratio. –Expedites removal of heat and metabolic byproducts –Increases delivery of O 2, nutrients, and hormones Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle, Katch, and Katch: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance, Sixth Edition Skeletal Muscle Ultrastructure Fibrils contain myofilaments. –Actin –Myosin Also of functional importance –Troponin –Tropomyosin In addition, there are several other structural proteins. Copyright © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.McArdle/


1 Chapter 13 – General Sensory Receptors Chapter 15 - Special Sensory Receptors Lecture 22 Marieb’s Human Anatomy and Physiology Marieb  Hoehn.

* For vestibulo- ocular reflex 27 External Anatomy of the Orbital Region Figure from: Saladin, Anatomy & Physiology, McGraw Hill, 2007 28 The Eye and Deep Orbital Region Visual Accessory Organs eyebrows eyelids (palpebrae) conjunctiva lacrimal apparatus extrinsic eye muscles Limbus 29 Eyelids palpebrae = eyelids composed of four layers skin muscle connective tissue conjunctiva orbicularis oculi – closes eye (CN VII) levator palpebrae superioris – raises eyelid/


Chapter 5 The Human Body. National EMS Education Standard Competencies  Anatomy and Physiology  Applies fundamental knowledge of the anatomy and function.

Alveolar Respiration 44 Levels of CO 2 Levels of O 2 Levels of CO 2 Cellular Respiration Muscles of Breathing  Diaphragm is primary muscle. – 60-70% of breathing Effort  Also involved are: – Intercostal muscles 30-40% of breathing Effort – Abdominal muscles – Pectoral muscles 45 Ventilation 46 The Respiratory System: Physiology  Function is to provide body with oxygen and eliminate carbon dioxide.  Ventilation and respiration are two/


1 Visual Anatomy & Physiology First Edition Martini & Ober Chapter 13 Brain and Cranial Nerves Lecture 20.

of the body - Although symmetrical, the cerebral hemispheres are not entirely equal in function 11 Overview of Cerebral Cortex Figure from: Martini, Anatomy & Physiology, Prentice Hall, 2001 12 Primary Motor Areas Primary Motor Cortex - voluntary control of skeletal muscles Figure from: Hole’s Human A&P, 12 th edition, 2010 13 Motor Areas of the Cortex Notice the relative amount of cortical/


Muscular System PCB 3703 Human Physiology S12-1 Human Physiology Muscular System.

(fibrous polymers): relaxed form Actin associated proteins A. Tropomyosin B. Troponin Muscular System PCB 3703 Human Physiology S12-7 Mechanics of Muscle Contraction 1. An action potential is generated by a motor nerve. 2. This causes the release of/ extracellular fluid, and the release of inositol triphosphate as a second messenger. Muscular System PCB 3703 Human Physiology S12-9 Mechanics of Muscle Contraction 6. Ca++ is then released from the endoplasmic reticular fluid of the cisterns (lateral sacs) /


1 Chapter 15 Special Senses Lecture 22 Marieb’s Human Anatomy and Physiology Ninth Edition Marieb  Hoehn.

* For vestibulo- ocular reflex 25 External Anatomy of the Orbital Region Figure from: Saladin, Anatomy & Physiology, McGraw Hill, 2007 26 The Eye and Deep Orbital Region Visual Accessory Organs eyebrows eyelids (palpebrae) conjunctiva lacrimal apparatus extrinsic eye muscles Limbus 27 Eyelids palpebrae = eyelids composed of four layers skin muscle connective tissue conjunctiva orbicularis oculi – closes eye (CN VII) levator palpebrae superioris – raises eyelid/


BIOL 3151: Principles of Animal Physiology ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY Dr. Tyler Evans Phone: 510-885-3475.

is cycled so quickly, no actual contraction occurs to facilitate this process heater organs have high numbers of sarcoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, but very few muscle cells HEATER ORGAN IN BILLFISH TODAY’S LECTURE CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY Circulatory system of a crab Chapter 8 pg 348-409 TODAY’S LECTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEMS circulatory systems transport oxygen and nutrients to actively metabolizing/


Pediatric Respiratory Physiology. Prenatal – Embryo Ventral pouch in primitive foregut becomes lung buds projecting into pleuroperitoneal cavity Endodermal.

cavity Endodermal part develops into airway alveolar membranes glands Mesenchymal elements develop into smooth muscle cartilage connective tissue vessels Pediatric Respiratory Physiology Pseudoglandular period – starting 17 th week of gestation Branching of airways down to / ml/kg by age 5 may be only 15% of TLC in young infants under GA plus muscle relaxants Pediatric Respiratory Physiology – Lung Volumes and Mechanics of Breathing Elastic properties, compliance and FRC Neonate chest wall compliance, C/


 DISCOVERY BY DIFFERENT SCIENTIST  WORD MEANING OF PHYSIOLOGY  INTRODUCTION OF PHYSIOLOGY  HISTORY  PHYSIOLOGY IS A PRECLINICAL SUBJECT  ROLE OF.

3June 3, 16571657 Nationality English Fields physician Doctoral advisor Hieronymus Fabricius Known for systemic circulation  Father of Physiology.  Discoverer of Circulatory System.  Research in Embryology. Born September 14September 14, 1849 Ryazan, Russia1849 /involuntary control. Location :- Heart wall. Function :- Pumps blood to all parts of the body. C. SMOOTH MUSCLE TISSUE Description :- Spindle-shaped, nonstriated fibers with one centrally located nucleus; involuntary control. Location :- Iris of /


Regulatory Physiology course Prof. László Détári Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology Pázmány P. sétány 1/C, detari.web.elte.hu.

: 500 ml, it can be 10 cm – damage of the spinal chord – jumping into shallow water! –abdominal wall (birthday candles, trumpet, always important above 40/minute) –accessory muscles – help inspiration in case of dyspnea   21/27 Eckert: Animal Physiology, W.H.Freeman and Co., N.Y.,2000, Fig. 13-31. Lung volumes lung volumes can be measured by spirometers - spirogram anatomical and/


Exercise Science Exercise Physiology.

. I. T. T. Principle Frequency Intensity Type Time Cardiorespiratory Miscellaneous Items… Exercise Physiology Cardiorespiratory Miscellaneous Items… Benefits of Regular Aerobic Activity Effects of Environment Altitude Heat Cold Skeletal Muscle Anatomy & Physiology Exercise Physiology Skeletal Muscle Anatomy & Physiology Necessary Elements of Skeletal Muscle Contraction Exercise Physiology Necessary Elements of Skeletal Muscle Contraction Nervous Impulse Energy (ATP) O2 (if sustained) Sliding Filament Theory/


Basic functions of cells

understand the mechanism of striated muscle contraction! Physiologic Anatomy of Striated muscle a whole muscle consists of a large number of muscle fibers (cells) , plus connective tissue wrappings, blood vessels, and nerve fibers. Skeletal Muscle – CT Sheaths Three connective tissue sheaths: Epimysium : surrounding the entire muscle Perimysium : surrounding groups of muscle fibers (fascicles) Endomysium : surrounding each muscle fiber (cell) At each end of a muscle, the collagen fibers of the/


The Autonomic Nervous System

neurons. Functionally, the ANS usually operates without conscious control. The ANS is regulated by the hypothalamus and brain stem. Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e Chapter 15 The Autonomic Nervous System Regulate activity of smooth muscle, cardiac muscle & certain glands Structures involved general visceral afferent neurons general visceral efferent neurons integration center within the brain Receives input from limbic system and other/


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