Ppt on ecology and environment

PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY Chapter 2. Organisms & Their Environment Ch. 2, Sec. 1.

PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY Chapter 2 Organisms & Their Environment Ch. 2, Sec. 1 What is Ecology? Ecology = study of interactions between organisms & their environment Ecology = study of interactions between organisms & their environment Disruptions to the environment can ripple throughout the entire ecosystem Disruptions to the environment can ripple throughout the entire ecosystem Biosphere Biosphere = parts of Earth and its atmosphere that support life, from the sky down to the bottom of the/


Environmental Problems Environmental Problems. Air pollution Factories Plants Power stations Cars damage to the environment damage to human health decrease.

Problems Air pollution Factories Plants Power stations Cars damage to the environment damage to human health decrease of life’ quality smog Factories Cars/and animals undrinkable water unpleasant view noise pollution Automobiles Trucks Aircraft Factories Home devices health problems: headache loss of hearing garbage spoilt countryside a source of infectious disease Waste materials Are you sure in your future? Are you sure in your future? What ecological problems are the most serious? What ecological/


Ecology Honors Biology – Chapter 13 Ecology - the study of interactions between organisms and their environment.

– Chapter 13 Ecology - the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Levels of Organization Biosphere Biome Ecosystem Community Population Organism Levels of Organization Biosphere /– a group of organisms so similar as to permit interbreeding & production of viable offspring Ecosystem Components Biotic living Abiotic nonliving Ecological Research Takes 3 Forms 1.Observation 2.Experimentation 3.Modeling Biodiversity = Interconnectedness All components play a role …some understood better /


ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT. What is an Ecological Footprint? If you had to provide everything you use from your own land — how much land area would you need?

land would have to provide you with all of your food, water, energy and everything else that you use. The amount of land you would need to support your lifestyle is called your Ecological Footprint. The ecological footprint is one way of measuring the impact a person has on the environment. Is the World Big Enough for All of Our BIG feet? The size/


Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology, Seventh EditionCHAPTER 52 Community Ecology Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology,

study of how organisms interact with each other and the environment. Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology, Seventh EditionCHAPTER 52 Community Ecology Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology, Seventh EditionCHAPTER 52 Community Ecology Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology, Seventh EditionCHAPTER 52 Community Ecology Ecology Definitions: Habitat: The space or environment when an organism lives Niche: role of an organism in a community Biotic/


Materials: Notebook & pencil Ecology Textbook 2/8/16 Agenda: Bell work Go over homework – 2.1 & 2.2 BP - SYMBIOSIS Ecology- Section 2.3 No gum, candy or.

Agenda: Bell work Go over homework – 2.1 & 2.2 BP - SYMBIOSIS Ecology- Section 2.3 No gum, candy or chewing please! DO: Today we will learn about how and why ecosystems are always changing. DQ: What are the three ways that organisms can / in which one biological community is replaced by another. Pioneer Species - are the first living things to move into a barren environment Read pages: 63-68. Finish the rest of the classwork/homework packet. Science Fair Complete bubble map Complete rubric checklist X:/


Aquatic Ecology: Biodiversity in Aquatic Systems G. Tyler Miller’s Living in the Environment 13 th Edition Chapter 7 G. Tyler Miller’s Living in the Environment.

Aquatic Ecology: Biodiversity in Aquatic Systems G. Tyler Miller’s Living in the Environment 13 th Edition Chapter 7 G. Tyler Miller’s Living in the Environment 13 th Edition Chapter 7 Dr./ Key Concepts  Factors that influence aquatic systems  Saltwater life zones  Freshwater life zones  Human activities that affect aquatic systems Aquatic Environments: Types, Components, and Limiting Factors  Marine systems  Freshwater systems  Plankton  Nekton  Benthos  Euphotic zone  Dissolved oxygen Fig. 7-2 p/


New Chapter of Maritime Industry with Ecology New Chapter of Maritime Industry with Ecology 2011. 1. 5 Prepared by C.H. Park Executive Vice President /

New Chapter of Maritime Industry with Ecology New Chapter of Maritime Industry with Ecology 2011. 1. 5 Prepared by C.H. Park Executive Vice President / CTO Ship Design and R&D Prepared by C.H. Park Executive Vice President / CTO Ship Design and R&D 01 / 33 Contents 1. Enlightenment 2. Near Future Green Technology 3. Future Green Technology 4. Environment Management 5. Conclusion New Chapter/


Intro to Ecology. A. Population 1. What level of organization in ecology describes an individual form of life, such as a plant, animal, bacterium, protist,

Biosphere D. Community Intro to Ecology A. Niche 4. What level of organization in ecology describes all the organisms that live in a place together with their physical environments? B. Ecosystem C. Biome D. Biosphere Intro to Ecology A. Abiotic 5. The/ anything living! TurtleRaccoon Red-wing blackbird WoodpeckerSquirrelFrog Intro to Ecology A. Consumer 9. The term which describes any organism that is able to capture energy from sunlight or chemicals and use it to produce its own food from inorganic compounds/


I. I.Population Ecology A. A.Density and Dispersion 2. 2.Dispersion Spatial distribution of organisms a. a.Clumped/Aggregated/Patchy Patches may occur.

schooling, pack formation, family groups) 3) 3)Limited dispersal of propagules (seeds, larvae, fragments) I. I.Population Ecology A. A.Density and Dispersion 2. 2.Dispersion b. b.Uniform Individuals evenly spaced May result from 1) 1)Territoriality (seabird nests, wolf/ distribution pattern Relatively rare (environment usually imposes pattern on distribution) May change over time Ex: Trees may be patchy when young and become more uniform as they grow larger I. I.Population Ecology B. B.Demography Study of/


Ecological Niche By: Sumaiyah Awad Problem: The Effect of Climate Change on Ecological Niches. Teacher: Br. Nassry Grade : 9 th grade one Date- April.27,2012.

Teacher: Br. Nassry Grade : 9 th grade one Date- April.27,2012 What is Ecological Niche ? Ecological Niche is the role that each species plays in its environment ( affecting its survival as a species ) Parameters of a Niche. An organisms life history./mass extinction of dinosaurs may have led the way for mammals to expand into the dinosaurs niches. ECOLOGICAL NICHE: EXTINCTION OF DINOSAURS ! White Pine Tree at Yellow Stone and its Not so Friendly Guest. The White Pine is a host to the Mountain Pine Beetle. /


AP Biology Bright blue marble spinning in space Ecology.

Ecology AP Biology biosphere ecosystem community population Studying organisms in their environment organism AP Biology Interacting with the environment  Biotic environment  prey (food)  competitors  predators, parasites, disease  Abiotic environment  sunlight  temperature  water  soil AP Biology Population Ecology/ Biology Changes in range  Range expansions & contractions  changing environment Woodlands Grassland, chaparral, and desert scrub 15,000 years ago glacial period Alpine tundra Spruce-/


Human Ecology vs. Cultural Ecology Ecological anthropologists who view themselves as human ecologists generally see ecology as providing a testable framework.

and nonhuman social behavior within a unified theoretical perspective. Those who view themselves as cultural ecologists, on the other hand, are more likely to reject a strict application of ecological principles to the study of the human condition on the grounds that culture acts as a mediating force which renders human adaptation to the environment/ analytically distinct from that of all other species. For cultural ecologists, ecology serves more as an orientation/


Lesson objectives: To be able to discuss sustainable city management in London To be able to discuss the ecological footprint of London Starter: Identify.

Lesson objectives: To be able to discuss sustainable city management in London To be able to discuss the ecological footprint of London Starter: Identify 10 facts you already know about London related to the Urban Environments syllabus 7 million people London sustainable cities and ecological footprints Urban growth (statistics) Centripetal movements (examples) Centrifugal movements Urban land use (explain) Location of residential areas (life cycle) Patterns/


Mr. Teds Science Class January 24th, 2016 What are we learning today? Unit 8: Ecological Relationships I will be able to: (1) Identify components of food.

Relationship: It is the relationship between living organisms and to their surrounding environment Ecological: الإيكولوجية Relationship: علاق Organisms: كائن حي environment: بيئة Ecological Relationship Habitat: the natural home or environment of an animal or plant natural: طبيعي: habitat: الموائل environment: بيئة Ecological Relationship What happens when your habitat becomes destroyed? Habitat: habitat: الموائل destroyed: دمرت Ecological Relationship Extinction: When all of one type of animal or/


Unit 2 – Lecture 1. Ecology the study of the relationships between living things and their environments “eco” – environment or ecology [greek: oikos =

relationships between living things and their environments “eco” – environment or ecology [greek: oikos = house / home – ie, Earth] Ecology – cont’d Includes relationships with biotic and abiotic factors: biotic – living abiotic – non-living prefix “a-” means non, or not Ecological Organization Organism anything which contains ALL of the charictaristics of life Species: a group of related organisms that can interbreed [and produce offspring that are fertile] Ecological Organization – cont’d/


Ecology. What is Ecology? The scientific study of organisms & how they interact with their environment.

Environment Biotic Factors: all of the living organisms that inhabit an environment – For example, plants & animals All organisms depend on others, directly or indirectly, for food, shelter, reproduction, or protection. Abiotic (A) or Biotic (B)? Biotic Abiotic Abiotic Biotic Biotic Ecological Levels/that live in the same place at the same time 4 th Level of Organization Ecosystem: populations of plants and animals that interact with each other in a given area with the abiotic components of that area 5 th /


organism biosphere Bio biosphere ecosystem community population Studying organisms in their environment organism.

of populations without limiting factors – introduced to a new environment or rebounding from a catastrophe Introduced species Non-native species /– examples African honeybee gypsy moth zebra mussel purple loosestrife kudzu gypsy moth Zebra musselssel ecological & economic damage ~2 months  reduces diversity  loss of food & nesting sites/ 2005  6 billion Industrial Revolution Significant advances in medicine through science and technology Bubonic plague "Black Death" Population of… China: 1.3 /


Population Ecology.

Population Ecology Population Dynamics ______________________: /affect population growth ____________________ any biotic or abiotic factor that restricts the existence of organisms in a specific environment. EX.- Amount of water, Amount of food, Temperature __________________ the maximum population size that can be/ care Ex: humans, elephants __________________________ can be classified into three general types Type I, Type II, and Type III I II III 50 100 1 10 1,000 Percentage of maximum life span Number of /


Ecology Note Card Challenge Who has many individuals of the same species living in the same area? I have ECOLOGY.

other is unharmed? I have TRANSPIRATION. Ecology Note Card Challenge Who has the level of ecology that includes the living and nonliving factors? I have COMMENSALISM. Ecology Note Card Challenge Who has the nonliving parts of an ecosystem? I have ECOSYSTEM. Ecology Note Card Challenge Who has the first organisms to live in a new environment? I have ABIOTIC. Ecology Note Card Challenge Who has the accumulation/


LEVELS OF ECOLOGY Organism Population Community Ecosystem Biosphere.

are these Lesser short-nosed fruit bats (Cynopterus barchyotis) affected by illegal logging? aninmalflightlab-lund.blogspot.com COMMUNITY ECOLOGY – study of a community and its environment How do these corals deal with predation by crown- of-thorns starfishes (Acanthaster planci)? scienceinpublic.com.au ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY – study of an ecosystem in its entirety How do caldera lakes react to increased agricultural activity in surrounding forests/


Population Ecology: Growth & Regulation Photo of introduced (exotic) rabbits at “plague proportions” in Australia from Wikimedia Commons.

Hacker (2014), Fig. 10.8 B If age-specific survival & fecundity remain constant, the population settles into a stable age distribution and population growth rate 11 = 1.32 1 = 1.38 12 = 1.32 13 = 1.32 etc. = 1.32 /decay Constant population size Exponential growth Peter Turchin The Fundamental Law of Population Ecology Original idea from Turchin (2001) Oikos “A population will grow… exponentially as long as the environment experienced by all individuals in the population remains constant.” In other words,/


EETT Learning Showcase Lancaster High School Amy Balling The Living Environment.

www.surveygizmo.com Audio version of the notes recorded as an mp3 Online flashcards www.quizlet.com Concept: Ecological Succession Ecological Succession a video which shows the way the environment can change over a long period of time from bare rock to a full forest and then due to the mistakes of man...back to bare rock again Student Clay-animation Video Online Collaboration/


Ancient environments Central Kansas - 80 Ma. Setting the Stage: Major Erosional/Depositional ‘Provinces’

Paleoecology Interactions among living organisms living within a particular ancient environment. Understanding gained through the: study of modern ecologies examination of fossils Ecology Great Barrier Reef, Australia Reconstructing Paleoecology Niobrara Formation (85 Ma), Kansas Study Rock Exposures Reconstructing Paleoecology Niobrara Sea (85 Ma), North America Determine Depositional Environment Reconstructing Paleoecology Collect and Study Fossils Plesiosaur Ammonite Mosasaur Niobrara Sea (85 Ma), Kansas/


1 Chemical ecology of tropical algae: Part I Bernardo A.P. da Gama Universidade Federal Fluminense Niterói – Rio de Janeiro - Brazil.

Few books, majority of knowledge is hot out of the press! Consequence of the novelty of this expanding field Ecological roles of marine natural products Edited by Valerie J. Paul Springer 2008 CRC Press 2001 Comstock Publishing 1992 5 The tropical marine environment Conspicuous and diverse coral reefs are NOT the only tropical ecosystems! Seagrass beds, rocky shores, mangrove forests – equally important 6/


EIA’s Product Ecology Initiative Holly Evans EIA Director of Environmental Affairs Municipal Waste Management Association Annual Meeting March 6, 2001.

product chain - from suppliers to OEMs EIA’s Environmental Issues Council represents industry on international, federal, and state environmental issues EIA’s Product Ecology Initiative Design for the Environment End-of-LifeManagement ProductUse Goal: Reduce Environmental Impacts over Entire Life Cycle! EIA’s “Product Ecology” Initiative Design for the Environment –EIA’s DfE Compilation (http://www.eia.org//download/eic/21/dfe- com1.pdf) –Material/


Welcome to Ecology Lab! On index card Name E-mail address Phone number Major & Year Other science courses (relevant/helpful to 335) Allergy/health concerns?

definition = you can change it as you learn more) - Come up with 4 examples of ecology - Elect 1 person to share with class What is Ecology? The study of organisms and their interactions with the environment What “counts” as the environment? What examples of ecology can you think of? Bkgd knowledge Observation HypothesisPrediction Test (Experiment) Not consistent Modify Hypothesis Consistent Theory The Scientific Method Today’s/


Ecology Part 1 CP BIOLOGY. THE TRANSFER OF ENERGY Trophic levels –step in a food chain or web Herbivores – eat plants Carnivores – eat meat Omnivores.

cycle Food Webs – intertwined food chains Food Chains – linear arrangement showing feeding relationships Ecological Pyramids – diagram that shows the relative amount of energy or matter within each trophic /the organic molecules of living things come from a nonliving part of the environment (the CO2 in air). The hydrogen atoms needed to make carbohydrates comes /cell The electron transport chain transfers energy from the NADH & FADH 2 and makes ATP. Occurs in the mitochondria of the cell http://www.youtube./


A generic risk assessment approach for multiple stressors & exposures Geoff Frampton, Guy Poppy, Jamie Sutherland Funded by Ecology & Evolutionary Biology.

) Currently, agricultural risks are assessed routinely only for GM crops and pesticides Other more environmentally damaging agricultural practices do not require risk/be assessed for environmental risk (UK Advisory Committee on Releases to the Environment (ACRE), 2006) Discrepancy in current agricultural risk assessment: How to /(Butler et al. 2007) Science 315 (5810) 2007 Required ecological resources Affected ecological resources Epigeic inverts Soil inverts Seeds Plant material Vertebrates Soil inverts/


Ecology Vocabulary Review Get out vocab sheet. Ecology: The study of how living things interact with nature.

Ecology: The study of how living things interact with nature Ecosystems The study of how living things interact with nature Abiotic Non Living parts of the environment Biotic The living parts of the environment Symbiosis A relationship where two different species live closely and/ to adapt. Population All of the members of a species in an area Ecosystem A community of organisms and their environment. Biosphere All of the living space on earth. Community All of the different organisms of different groups in/


Managing for Resilience in Benthic Marine Environments The Challenge of a Sustainable Future: Contributions of LTER Science Russell J. Schmitt UC Santa.

Environments The Challenge of a Sustainable Future: Contributions of LTER Science Russell J. Schmitt UC Santa Barbara Moorea Coral Reef LTER Santa Barbara Coastal LTER 11 th Annual NSF - LTER Mini-Symposium National Science Foundation March 1, 2012 Many ecological /the critical tipping point for system to return to coral Human activities reduce grazing in 2 ways: fishing adult parrotfish and destroying parrotfish nursery habitat. Grazing in Moorea still well right of the tipping point Coral Cover (%) 60 40 /


Click on a lesson name to select. Chapter 4 Population Ecology Section 1: Population Dynamics Section 2: Human Population.

4.1 Population Dynamics  The carrying-capacity strategy, or k-strategy, is an adaptation for living in stable environments. Chapter 4 Human Population Growth  The study of human population size, density, distribution, movement, and birth and death rates is demography. 4.2 Human Population Population Ecology Chapter 4 Technological Advances  For thousands of years, environmental conditions kept the size of the human population at/


Unit 2 – Lecture 1. Ecology the study of the relationships between living things and their environments “eco” – environment or ecology [greek: oikos =

study of the relationships between living things and their environments “eco” – environment or ecology [greek: oikos = house / home – ie, Earth] Review What does the prefix “bio” mean? Ecology – cont’d Includes relationships with biotic and abiotic factors: biotic – living Answer the Following: Other than animals, name 3 examples of biotic factors in an environment. Ecology – cont’d Includes relationships with biotic and abiotic factors: abiotic – non-living prefix “a/


Ecology Community interactions. What would happen if…  All the trees in the Amazon were cut down?  All the polar bears in the Arctic died?  The temperature.

bears in the Arctic died?  The temperature of the Earth increased by 5 degrees? Ecology  The branch of the biology that deals _________________________________________ _________________________________________  Population  Community  Ecosystem  Biosphere Factors that affect the environment  Abiotic  Biotic Niche  _______________________________________  how it meets its needs for food and shelter  how it survives  how it reproduces Producer Primary consumer Secondary consumer Decomposer Energy/


Ecology & the Biosphere Chapter 52. Ecology Study of how organisms relate to one another & their environment.

> 20 Limits of distribution Fig. 52-9 Ecology Organism (behavioral ecology) Population (several individuals of same species) Community (different species that live in a particular area) Ecosystem (abiotic factors & all the species that live in that area) Biosphere (all the living communities on earth-global ecosystem) Environment Abiotic factors (nonliving): Temperature Water Sunlight Soil /rocks Climate Environment Climate Bodies of water Variation of sunlight/


Ecology Jeopardy Directions In Jeopardy, remember the answer is in the form of a question. Select a question by clicking on it. After reading the question.

affect the animals in a salt marsh would be considering this level of organization. $200 Answer from Ecology Extras What is ecosystem? $300 Question from Ecology Extras Rocks, temperature, and water are what part of the environment? $300 Answer from Ecology Extras What is abiotic? $400 Question from Ecology Extras The term used to describe a sparrow that has been caught by an eagle. $400 Answer/


Ecology Chapter 2 Section 1 pp. 34-45. What is Ecology Ecology is the study of the interactions between organisms (living things) and the environment.

Abiotic –Temperature –Soil type –Water –Sunlight –Rocks –Geology –Air currents –Water currents Biotic –Other animals and plants –Living organisms affect other living organisms –Organisms compete for resources The Environment To make studying ecology easier, the environment is organized into different sized parts –Organism –Population –Community –Ecosystem –Biosphere The Environment: Organism Smallest Level of Organization An Organism is a single living individual Organism is a term/


Ecology of Populations. Ecological levels Organism – An individual Population – Individuals of the same species Community – Different populations in one.

Population – Individuals of the same species Community – Different populations in one location Ecosystem – Community of populations and their interactions with the environment (abiotic factors) What is Ecology? Coral Reef as an Ecosystem Population density – pattern of dispersal of individuals across an area of interest Resources – abiotic (nonliving) and biotic (living) components of environment Limiting factors – environmental aspects that determine where an organism lives Demographics- Density/


Behavioral Ecology. Important concepts: Fixed action patterns (FAP’s) Imprinting Kinds of learning: Classical Operant Inclusive fitness and altruism.

of animals in their natural environment. Behavioral Ecology Behavior Behavioral Ecology Behavior Behavioral Ecology Genetics Behavior Behavioral Ecology Genetics Natural selection Behavior Behavioral Ecology Genetics Natural selection Learning Behavior Behavioral Ecology Genetics Natural selection Learning Environment Behavior Behavioral Ecology Genetics Natural selection Learning Environment Ethologists ask proximate questions, such as “What triggers this behavior?” and ultimate questions, like “Why did/


Population Ecology Chapter 36. Population Group of individuals of a single species that occupy the same general area. Population density = number of individuals.

Population Ecology Chapter 36 Population Group of individuals of a single species that occupy the same general area. Population density = number /, space, predation Population will grow quickly (more births than deaths) at the beginning then will level off (equal number of deaths and births) when the population reaches the environment’s carrying capacity  Carrying capacity – Maximum number of individuals that an environment can support based off the resources available (based off of the limiting factors)


Ecosystems. Definitions  Ecology - Study of interactions between organisms & environment  Population – same organisms, living together  Community –

Ecosystems Definitions  Ecology - Study of interactions between organisms & environment  Population – same organisms, living together  Community – several populations, living together  Ecosystem - abiotic & biotic components of/overview of ecosystem dynamics Biological magnification of DDT in a food chain Biogeochemical Cycles  Pathways where chemicals cycle between living things and non-living things.  Water cycle  Carbon cycle  Nitrogen cycle The water cycle The carbon cycle The nitrogen cycle /


Developing Understanding of Ecological Economic Systems

in Stella/SME. Physical Modules Theory well known (e.g. Navier Stokes). Primary focus on computation. hydrodynamics, atmospheric dynamics. Modules developed externally and linked to SME. Institute for Ecological Economics Spatial Modeling Environment Collaborative Spatial Modeling Workbench Includes integrated support for: Icon-based unit module development Module archiving and reuse Integration of multiple spatial representations Distributed computing Web-based modeling & simulation Configuration, control/


Chapter 4 Population Ecology

a population per unit area is a density-independent factor. Weather events Fire Human alterations of the landscape Air, land, and water pollution Density-Dependent Factors Chapter 4 Population Ecology 4.1 Population Dynamics Density-Dependent Factors Any factor in the environment that depends on the number of members in a population per unit area is a density-dependent factor. Biotic factors Disease/


Chapter 4 Population Ecology

a population per unit area is a density-independent factor. Weather events Fire Human alterations of the landscape Air, land, and water pollution Density-Dependent Factors Chapter 4 Population Ecology 4.1 Population Dynamics Density-Dependent Factors Any factor in the environment that depends on the number of members in a population per unit area is a density-dependent factor. Biotic factors Disease/


Chapter 4 Population Ecology

a population per unit area is a density-independent factor. Weather events Fire Human alterations of the landscape Air, land, and water pollution Density-Dependent Factors Chapter 4 Population Ecology 4.1 Population Dynamics Density-Dependent Factors Any factor in the environment that depends on the number of members in a population per unit area is a density-dependent factor. Biotic factors Disease/


Home Communit y Relations Communit y Relations Responsible Employer Responsible Employer Environment Cultural Events Social Events Partner and Charity.

Sanitation by Easily Degradable Agents Effective Use of Vehicle Space Responsible Employer Responsible Employer Community Relations Community Relations Environment Responsible Producer Responsible Producer Events Ecological Approach Ecological Approach Ecological Approach Ecological Approach The company Pivovary Staropramen behaves in an environmentally friendly and responsible way Ecological liquidation of illuminated advertisements placed by the company on the establishments to which it delivers its beer/


Principles of Ecology Bio C2.

Principles of Ecology Bio C2 Principles of Ecology Organisms and their Environment A. Sharing the world 1. Studying Nature B. What is ecology? 1. Definition of ecology 2. Ecological research C. The Biosphere Principles of Ecology The Biosphere 1. Structure of the biosphere 2. The non-living environment 3. Living environment II. Levels of Organization Principles of Ecology Levels of Organization A. Population- group of same species interbreeding & living together in same/


Tema 1. Ecological Economics 1.Economic activity and Environment 2.Foundations of Ecological Economics.

’s surface; Biosphere -- living organisms and their immediate environment. - “Ecosphere” The concept of Ecological Economics Interdependent systems The economy in the environment Threats to sustainability The concept of Ecological Economics Interdependent systems The economy in the environment Threats to sustainability 1. Economic activity and Environment 2. Foundations of Ecological Economics The Environment 1. Economic activity and Environment 2. Foundations of Ecological Economics The carbon cycle o The/


PROJECT Ecological Solutions at our SchoolTO CHANGE CHANGE US US.

was that younger students learned how the “new high school” would work and how to use it. Ecological Solutions at our School I took the first step by doing a course about the environment for younger students. I took the first step by doing a course about the environment for younger students. Ecological Solutions at our School Here is a chart which shows the students/


Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology, Seventh Edition Solomon Berg Martin Chapter 51 Introduction to Ecology: Population Ecology.

exhibiting a K strategy Maintains a population near the carrying capacity of the environment Species often have large body size, low reproductive rates, long life spans, and they inhabit stable environments Copyright © 2005 Brooks/Cole — Thomson Learning Biology, Seventh EditionCHAPTER 51 Introduction to Ecology: Population Ecology Survivorship curves Type I –Mortality is greatest in old age Type II –Mortality is spread evenly across all ages/


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