Ppt on crop production management

1 PRODUCTION RISK Risk Faced by Small Scale Producers March, 2008 Dr. Laurence Crane National Crop Insurance Services www.ag-risk.org.

Risk Primary Sources  Adverse weather  Disease and pests  Input availability and quality  Technological advances  Mechanical failure  Agricultural industrialization 17 Why U.S. Crops Fail 18 Production Risk Primary Responses 1. Control or minimize risk through management practices 2. Reduce production variability  Diversification  Flexibility  Vertical Integration  Apply technology  Contingency planning 3. Transfer risk to someone else  Contracting  Insurance 19 1. Control or Minimize/


SADC Agricultural Information Management System: Crop and Rangeland Monitoring Activities for Early Warning for Food Security Blessing Siwela, Agricultural.

warning remote sensing and GIS datasets Identified Areas of Need / Concern Agricultural Production Information  Rainfall amount and patterns  Crop Area Measurement  Yield Estimate  Crop Cycles Disaster Monitoring  Drought / Flood  Bush Fires  Cyclones  Pest and Diseases Natural Resources Management  Water bodies monitoring  Soil types and Fertility  Wetland status Land Management Information  Deforestation / afforestation  Alien Species Invasion  Grazing Capacity  Seasonal biomass monitoring/


1 Sustainable Vegetable Production PART II Presenter’s Name Presenter’s Title Presenter’s Organization.

 Row covers shade Insect exclusion weather protection  Green manure and cover crops  Mulches  Irrigation  Intercropping /companion planting  Others GROWING METHODOLOGIES 22 CROP ROTATION  The practice of growing different crops or cover crops in sequence to achieve particular crop management goals Nutrient cycling, minimize insect and disease pests, weed management, soil health Chiefly to preserve the productive capacity of the soil Helps improve soil structure as well as fertility/


Vegetable Crops – PLSC 451/551 Lesson 10, Organic Strategies Instructor: Stephen L. Love Aberdeen R & E Center 1693 S 2700 W Aberdeen, ID 83210 Phone:

materialMushroom compost PerlitePotassium sulfate Ground shellsElemental sulfur Wood ashes Organic Vegetable Production Fertility management – prohibited products Ammonia productsCalcium nitrate Sewage sludgeHydrated lime Fortified humic acidLeather meal Magnesium nitrateMuriate of potash Phosphoric acidPotassium nitrate Super phosphateTriple phosphate UreaVitamin B-1 Weed Control Cultural weed control Rotate with competitive crops Employ incorporation of green manures Utilize drip irrigation Plastic or/


Unit 9: Soil Fertility Management Chapter 10. Objectives Understand objectives of soil fertility management Understand objectives of soil fertility management.

found in the plant) N, K, Ca, P, Mg, S Crops typically contain: (in rank of amount found in the plant) N, K, Ca, P, Mg, S Goals & Concerns in Fertility Management Utilizing fertilizers may help cut unit cost of production by maximizing yield Utilizing fertilizers may help cut unit cost of production by maximizing yield –Improved fertility = improved yields, improved aesthetic appeal Environmental/


Earth Observation for Crop Modelling International trends & developments How to promote earth observation applications? How to get funding? Capacity building.

monitoring (environmental protection) in Brazil 19 Improved Prediction Insurance Very much in focus as part of agricultural risk management strategy (World Bank reports: Managing Agricultural Production Risk & Agricultural Insurance) Example of use of earth observation: ADASCIS, Belgium The use of remote sensing and agrometeorological modelling for crop damage & risk assessment in support of the Belgian Calamity Fund Business model developed countries: more about income/


UNIT 4. Environmental issues in food production Food Production Environmental issues Primary Production Land degradation (erosion) Use of chemical products-

one of the seven recognised certification bodies that are accredited and audited by the Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS). – Products have been produced in accordance with specific organic standards. Farmers have to prove organic strategies, e.g crop rotations, weed control, pest management, biodiversity, water management, animal health etc. Why Change? Why change from traditional to organic? What are the benefits? Why people care/


Exam 3 begins here. Recall: Three components interact to produce different biocontrol approaches Cropping System Pest Complex Natural Enemy Ideal Emphasize.

containing pesticides –USDA mostly regulate crop development, testing, and release. If crop contains pesticides, USDA & EPA jointly regulate. Crop Use Crop Production IPM Implementation Chapter 19 – Societal and Environmental Limitations to IPM Tactics –Societal constraints and public attitudes –Environmental issues Chapter 18 – IPM Programs: Development and Implementation Chapter 20 – IPM into the Future Societal Limitations Society places limits on pest management techniques because of risk perception/


First Tribune Insurance 2015 Crop Insurance Spring Farm Meeting.

person who has been actively engaged in farming for a share of the insured crop’s production in the county ›If a crop is planted and insurable it is considered producing the crop for NP purposes (i.e. wheat for grain that gets short-rated or/ crop on entirely different land for 2 APH crop years or less in the county Use RMA RO Determined Yield Request form and the request must be made by the Production Reporting Date WFRP Basics A whole-farm insurance product that provides producers with risk management /


 The only guarantee of any income when you plant or are prevented from planting your crops  Takes the place of shrinking government programs  Allows.

 You must leave approved inspection strips for appraisal if crop is being destroyed or put to another use other than originally intended  Not needed if adjuster can make an immediate appraisal  You must provide acceptable records of production  Weigh tickets/Settlement sheets  Cannot have a split load or a receipt without a backup farm management record  Quality adjustment requirements for grain  Mycotoxins  Verification/


Innovations in Agriculture: Genomics for Better Agri- Productivity Dr Shahana Urooj Kazmi Dean – Faculty of Science and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology.

and their exploitation through functional genomics. 4) Discovery of important genes of crop, animal and microbes and their exploitation through functional genomics. 5) Data management and development of Bioinformatics. 5) Data management and development of Bioinformatics. Outreach & Training. Outreach & Training. Challenges Major challenges in the 21st Century are increased food and fiber production, a cleaner environment, and renewable energy resources. A greater understanding of/


Crop Biotech, Aquaculture, and Animal Agriculture: Identifying Trends, Concerns, and Best Practices Ike Sharpless Winslow Management Company Tuesday, Sept.

-activated seed coatings.” PlantTech’s agristrike (below) “PlantTech is the largest Australian field crop, canola and pasture Seed Company, with an unsurpassed product range of leading proprietary cereal, oilseed, pasture, pulse and forage varieties, plus access / sustainable aquaculture is vital to prevent massive fisheries collapse Inherently more controllable than marine capture If well managed, can provide plentiful protein at a low Food Conversion Ratio (FCR) while cycling wastes and nutrients/


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

mandatory in some countries (e.g., United States) Mixing GM crops with non-GM products confounds labeling attempts Mixing GM crops with non-GM products confounds labeling attempts  Society New advances may be skewed to interests/.S. become ill from household pesticides. Animation: Pesticide Examples Animations/pesticide_examples.html PROTECTING FOOD RESOURCES: PEST MANAGEMENT  Advantages and disadvantages of conventional chemical pesticides. Individuals Matter: Rachel Carson  Wrote Silent Spring which /


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

per year trying to lose weight.  $24 billion per year is needed to eliminate world hunger. FOOD PRODUCTION  Food production from croplands, rangelands, ocean fisheries, and aquaculture has increased dramatically.  Wheat, rice, and corn provide more/depletion Biological pest control Overgrazing Integrated pest management Overfishing Loss of biodiversity Efficient irrigation Loss of prime cropland Perennial crops Crop rotation Food waste Water-efficient crops Subsidies for unsustainable farming and fishing /


ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS, ADAPTATION, AND VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN EGYPT: FOOD PRODUCTION AND WATER NEEDS Ayman F. Abou Hadid Mahmoud Medany Egyptian.

models was used to detect the climate impact on wheat crop productivity and water use. Primary results on the impact of climate on wheat crop productivity and water needs were obtained. Analysis on another crops is being carried out. Simulation models mainly DSSAT is the tools for analysis and databases of historical climatic data, soils and crop management variables for Egypt, which are being used in the/


Potato Economics: Potato Markets, Marketing & Cost of Production Potato Science PLSC 490/590 Lecture 20 April 8, 2014 Paul E. Patterson Extension Agricultural.

not. You may not, however, be getting a market rate of return on you labor, your management, and your equity. 68 Become the low cost producer – forever. Summary Focus on producing the highest quality crop for the lowest cost per cwt Manage your production costs You can only manage what you measure It’s not how many potatoes your produce per acre, it’s ultimately/


Integrating ACRE, SURE, and Crop Insurance: Producer Strategies for 2010 Paul D. Mitchell Agricultural and Applied Economics University of Wisconsin-Madison.

contiguous county or suffer 50% production loss Suffer at least 10% production loss on at least 1 crop from a natural disaster Suffer at least 10% production loss on at least 1 crop from a natural disaster (Price drops alone will not trigger SURE) Satisfy the Risk Management Purchase Requirement Satisfy the Risk Management Purchase Requirement Buy crop insurance! Buy crop insurance! Risk Management Purchase Requirement Details Must have insurance/


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN Chapter 12 Food, Soil, and Pest Management.

production Industrialized Crop Production Relies on High-Input Monocultures Industrialized agriculture, high-input agriculture Goal is to steadily increase crop yield Plantation agriculture: cash crops Primarily in less-developed countries Increased use of greenhouses to raise crops/Aquifer depletion Integrated pest management Overgrazing Efficient irrigation Perennial crops Loss of biodiversity and agrobiodiversity Crop rotation Fossil fuel use Overfishing Water-efficient crops Greenhouse gas emissions Soil/


Conifer Plantation Management Module 2 1 Managing Your Plantation Module #2.

maintain optimum growing space for trees as they mature u Thin for to maintain growth and vigour (IDEAL STOCKING) u Properly managed forests produce the best forest products Plantation Dynamics Conifer Plantation Management Module 2 12 Plantation Dynamics u Initial spacing ~2,500 trees/hectare u Final crop 200-300 trees/hectare u Trees removed either by: u Mother Nature u You Conifer Plantation/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 7. Core Case Study: Grains of Hope or an Illusion?  Vitamin A deficiency in some developing countries leads to.

, using integrated pest management, promoting agrobiodiversity, and providing government subsidies for more sustainable farming, fishing, and aquaculture. 7-6 How Can We Produce Food More Sustainably? (2)  Concept 7-6B Producing enough food to feed the rapidly growing human population will require growing crops in a mix of monocultures and polycultures and decreasing the enormous environmental impacts of industrialized food production. Soil Conservation/


HOME 7/26/2004 10:05 AM Water Management System Water Management System Geophysical Parameters Geophysical Parameters Evaluation Criteria (Economic, Management,

CRITERIA: COST OF UNRELIABILITY More Output (2 of 3) $ lost from reductions in –Economic activity –Quality of life –Other social benefits Beneficiaries of implemented water management strategies Effects of water management strategies on different sectors/demographic groups Crop production cost BACK MORE HOME 7/26/2004 10:05 AM EVALUATION CRITERIA: COST OF UNRELIABILITY More Output (3 of 3) Pumping cost Treatment cost (for/


Copyright © 2005 Center for Farm Financial Management, University of Minnesota. All Rights Reserved. Celebrity Squares Search for a Pre- Harvest Advantage.

. Corn 2006 Pre-Harvest Marketing Plan http://www.cffm.umn.edu/Marketing/MarketingPlans.asp Copyright © 2005 Center for Farm Financial Management, University of Minnesota. All Rights Reserved. Objective: Buy crop insurance to protect my production risk, and have 75% of my anticipated corn crop (based on APH yield) priced by late May. Price 2,500 bushels at $5.15 cash price ($5.65 Nov/


Cultural practices include all the crop production and management techniques which are utilized by the farmers to maximize their crop productivity and/

colour and high TSS; Resistant to Fusarium and Verticillium wilt. EndPrevious Next Summary Cultural practices include all the crop production and management techniques which are utilized by the farmers to maximize their crop productivity and/ or farm income. Crops/varieties to be grown, time and planting, tillage, field and crop sanitation, application of fertilizers and irrigation, harvesting times and procedures, and even off season operations in fallow/


Risk Management for Agricultural Producers It = s a whole new ballgame… Risk Management is a whole new ballgame. It means confidence in a changing world.

me assess my business risk exposure? WE HAVE IDENTIFIED 5 MAIN SOURCES OF RISK: PRODUCTION MARKETING FINANCE LEGAL HUMAN RESOURCES UNDERSTANDING PRODUCTION RISKS Production Risks Divisions Enterprise Diversification Crop Insurance Contract Production Evaluation New Technologies Enterprise Diversification Combining dissimilar production processes. Enterprise Diversification: Ask yourself…….. What knowledge and management capabilities are needed for the extra enterprise? Are they readily available? Do I have/


PREVIOUSNEXT END. Abstract: Successful crop management relies on selecting suitable crops to the type of soil present in that region. Most of crops prefer.

. Textbook of Soil Science: 2 nd edition. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi. Gupta, R.K. and I.P. Abrol. 1990. Salt–affected soils – Their reclamation and management for crop production. Advances in soil science 12,223-275. Sehgal, J, 2005. A textbook of Pedology: Concepts and applications: 2 nd edition. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana. www.apps.caes.uga.edu/sbof/main/


National Conference on Agriculture for Rabi Campaign, 2013 Group –IV Interventions to increase Oilseeds, Pulses Production in different ecologies Date.

 Adequate plant stand through adjustment in seed rate and thinning  Timely weed management to reduce crop weed competition  Need based plant protection with bioagents and biopesticides  Promotion of PGPR like Rhizobium, Azotobacter, Azospirillum, PSB, etc.  Liming in acid soil to improve crop productivity. 34 Important Insect Pests and Diseases of Oilseed Crops Groundnut Leaf SpotBud NecrosisRoot GrubSpodoptera Rapeseed- Mustard Sunflower Alternaria leaf blightNecrosisCapitulum borer Contd/


January 2010 Steven D. Johnson Farm & Ag Business Management Specialist (515) 957-5790

Prove your APH annually for Optional Units Consider Multiple Pre-Harvest Marketing Strategies Use Crop Insurance Revenue Products (Consider Additional Hail Coverage) 5 Strategies for Managing Revenue Risk Wrap up Crop Sales with Spring Seasonal Price Trends Source: Johnson, ISU Extension, January 2010 5 Crop Insurance Web Sites Crop Risk Management - ISU Polk County (Crop Marketing Newsletter & Crop Insurance Updates, Webcasts) www.extension.iastate.edu/polk/farmmanagement USDA Risk/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 12. Core Case Study: Grains of Hope or an Illusion?  Vitamin A deficiency in some developing countries leads.

, using integrated pest management, promoting agrobiodiversity, and providing government subsidies for more sustainable farming, fishing, and aquaculture. 12-6 How Can We Produce Food More Sustainably? (2)  Concept 12-6B Producing enough food to feed the rapidly growing human population will require growing crops in a mix of monocultures and polycultures and decreasing the enormous environmental impacts of industrialized food production. Reduce Soil/


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

per year trying to lose weight.  $24 billion per year is needed to eliminate world hunger. FOOD PRODUCTION  Food production from croplands, rangelands, ocean fisheries, and aquaculture has increased dramatically.  Wheat, rice, and corn provide more/depletion Biological pest control Overgrazing Integrated pest management Overfishing Loss of biodiversity Efficient irrigation Loss of prime cropland Perennial crops Crop rotation Food waste Water-efficient crops Subsidies for unsustainable farming and fishing /


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

making purchases in the marketplace They live regularly without making purchases in the marketplace Industrial Food Production:  Livestock production in developed countries is industrialized: Feedlots are used to fatten up cattle before slaughter. /depletion Biological pest control Overgrazing Integrated pest management Overfishing Loss of biodiversity Efficient irrigation Loss of prime cropland Perennial crops Crop rotation Food waste Water-efficient crops Subsidies for unsustainable farming and fishing /


Overview of Crop Models Gerrit Hoogenboom Director, AgWeatherNet & Professor of Agrometeorology Washington State University, USA Food – Energy – Water.

– Prescribe spatially variable management Water and irrigation management Soil fertility management Plant breeding and Genotype * Environment interactions (“virtual” crop models) Gene-based modeling Yield prediction for crop management Crop Model Applications Climate variability & risk management Climate change impacts & adaptation Soil carbon sequestration Land use change analysis Targeting aid (Early Warning) Yield forecasting Biofuel production Risk insurance (rainfall ) Crop Model Applications Policy/


Lecture 11 Agriculture and Development Agriculture refers to the production of food and goods through farming and forestry. Agriculture was the key development.

organic matter releasing CO 2, and reduces the abundance and diversity of soil organisms Tillageno-till Pest control includes the management of weeds, insects/mites, and diseases. Pest controlweedsinsects/mites diseases Nutrient management incudes both the source of nutrient inputs for crop and livestock production, and the method of utilization of manure produced by livestock. Nutrient inputs can be chemical inorganic fertilizers, manure, green/


AGRICULTURE & FORESTRY. Managing Agriculture and Forestry The land must contain the nutrients needed to grow the food Human nutritional needs 2,000-2,500.

as density of farmers does not exceed forest’s ability to regenerate Rainforest Deforestation – to grow hardwood and commercial food crops (sugar & coffee) Rainforests contain 2/3 of global biomass & ½ of global biodiversity Threatens biodiversity, climate stabilization, flood control & O 2 production Managing Agriculture and Forestry Current Forest Harvesting Practices Forestry as Agriculture Monoculture forestry Dense single species stands Increases yield & ease of/


Vtc.edu Module 8: Nutrient Management 8.1: Introduction to macro- & micronutrients 8.2: Nitrogen 8.3: Phosphorous 8.4: Potassium and other nutrients 8.5:

Darby (2009) EQIP, the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, is administered by NRCS as a voluntary conservation program. Aims to combine agricultural production & environmental conservation Offers financial & technical help for implementation of structures or management practices. EQIP eligibility requires complete NRCS crop records for the previous year. vtc.edu Recordkeeping cheat sheets Darby (2009) Consider maintaining a summary sheet or log of: All discrepancies/


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

per year trying to lose weight.  $24 billion per year is needed to eliminate world hunger. FOOD PRODUCTION  Food production from croplands, rangelands, ocean fisheries, and aquaculture has increased dramatically.  Wheat, rice, and corn provide more/depletion Biological pest control Overgrazing Integrated pest management Overfishing Loss of biodiversity Efficient irrigation Loss of prime cropland Perennial crops Crop rotation Food waste Water-efficient crops Subsidies for unsustainable farming and fishing /


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 12. Core Case Study: Grains of Hope or an Illusion?  Vitamin A deficiency in some developing countries leads.

, using integrated pest management, promoting agrobiodiversity, and providing government subsidies for more sustainable farming, fishing, and aquaculture. 12-6 How Can We Produce Food More Sustainably? (2)  Concept 12-6B Producing enough food to feed the rapidly growing human population will require growing crops in a mix of monocultures and polycultures and decreasing the enormous environmental impacts of industrialized food production. Reduce Soil/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 12. Soil: the foundation for agriculture  Land devoted to agriculture covers 38% of Earth’s land surface  Agriculture.

 The FAO’s Farmer-Centered Agricultural Resource Management Program (FAR)… Helps farmers duplicate agricultural success stories Uses/production Industrialized Crop Production Relies on High-Input Monocultures  Industrialized agriculture, high-input agriculture Goal is to steadily increase crop yield Plantation agriculture: cash crops Increased use of greenhouses to raise crops A Closer Look at Industrialized Crop Production  Green Revolution: increase crop yields Monocultures of high-yield key crops/


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN Chapter 12 Food, Soil, and Pest Management.

production Industrialized Crop Production Relies on High-Input Monocultures Industrialized agriculture, high-input agriculture Goal is to steadily increase crop yield Plantation agriculture: cash crops Primarily in less-developed countries Increased use of greenhouses to raise crops/Aquifer depletion Integrated pest management Overgrazing Efficient irrigation Perennial crops Loss of biodiversity and agrobiodiversity Crop rotation Fossil fuel use Overfishing Water-efficient crops Greenhouse gas emissions Soil/


LAND MANAGEMENT. Abuse of the Land Tragedy of the Commons Deforestation Provide fuel & building materials, space for growing food, cash crops or cattle.

as density of farmers does not exceed forest’s ability to regenerate Rainforest Deforestation – to grow hardwood and commercial food crops (sugar & coffee) Rainforests contain 2/3 of global biomass & ½ of global biodiversity Threatens biodiversity, climate stabilization, flood control & O 2 production Managing Agriculture and Forestry Current Forest Harvesting Practices Forestry as Agriculture Monoculture forestry Dense single species stands Increases yield & ease of/


11:37:23 PM 1 of 32 ADVANCING SDI FOR LOWER VALUE CROPS - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES Freddie Lamm Professor and Research Irrigation Engineer KSU Northwest.

generally use a measured or remotely-sensed characteristic of plant water stress to trigger an irrigation event. Management of Irrigated Crop Production Concepts of irrigation scheduling 11:37:23 PM 20 of 32 Although there is a wealth of / discourage enduser involvement or conversely might encourage endusers to circumvent system decisions they might not understand. Management of Irrigated Crop Production Enduser vs. autonomous system control These are valid issues. I would optimistically hope for a middle/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 12. Core Case Study: Grains of Hope or an Illusion?  Vitamin A deficiency in some developing countries leads.

, using integrated pest management, promoting agrobiodiversity, and providing government subsidies for more sustainable farming, fishing, and aquaculture. 12-6 How Can We Produce Food More Sustainably? (2)  Concept 12-6B Producing enough food to feed the rapidly growing human population will require growing crops in a mix of monocultures and polycultures and decreasing the enormous environmental impacts of industrialized food production. Reduce Soil/


Company Overview Phytech Ltd. -Phytomonitoring TM crop management control.

advantage over commercial analogs.  Complex combination of hardware, software, application techniques, and know-how. This allows to attribute the product to the category of on line information and decision-support system for crop growing. Phytech Ltd. - CROP GROWTH CONTROL Phytech Ltd. -Phytomonitoring TM crop management control solutions developed by Phytech Citrus: Time to Market protocol based on fruit size. Avocado: Precise irrigation according to the/


Chapter 13 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

per year trying to lose weight.  $24 billion per year is needed to eliminate world hunger. FOOD PRODUCTION  Food production from croplands, rangelands, ocean fisheries, and aquaculture has increased dramatically.  Wheat, rice, and corn provide more/depletion Biological pest control Overgrazing Integrated pest management Overfishing Loss of biodiversity Efficient irrigation Loss of prime cropland Perennial crops Crop rotation Food waste Water-efficient crops Subsidies for unsustainable farming and fishing /


Chapter 12 Food, Soil Conservation, and Pest Management.

fuel.Uses less tractor fuel. SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE THROUGH SOIL CONSERVATION  Terracing, contour planting, strip cropping, alley cropping, and windbreaks can reduce soil erosion. Figure 13-16 SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE THROUGH SOIL CONSERVATION  Fertilizers/ Sustainable Food Production  We can increase food security by slowing populations growth, sharply reducing poverty, and slowing environmental degradation of the world’s soils and croplands. PROTECTING FOOD RESOURCES: PEST MANAGEMENT  Organisms /


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN Chapter 12 Food, Soil, and Pest Management.

production Industrialized Crop Production Relies on High-Input Monocultures Industrialized agriculture, high-input agriculture Goal is to steadily increase crop yield Plantation agriculture: cash crops Primarily in less-developed countries Increased use of greenhouses to raise crops/Aquifer depletion Integrated pest management Overgrazing Efficient irrigation Perennial crops Loss of biodiversity and agrobiodiversity Crop rotation Fossil fuel use Overfishing Water-efficient crops Greenhouse gas emissions Soil/


LAND USE, RESOURCES AND MANAGEMENT. Abuse of the Land Tragedy of the Commons Deforestation Provide fuel & building materials, space for growing food,

as density of farmers does not exceed forest’s ability to regenerate Rainforest Deforestation – to grow hardwood and commercial food crops (sugar & coffee) Rainforests contain 2/3 of global biomass & ½ of global biodiversity Threatens biodiversity, climate stabilization, flood control & O 2 production Managing Agriculture and Forestry Current Forest Harvesting Practices Forestry as Agriculture Monoculture forestry Dense single species stands Increases yield & ease of/


LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN Chapter 12 Food, Soil, and Pest Management.

production Industrialized Crop Production Relies on High-Input Monocultures Industrialized agriculture, high-input agriculture Goal is to steadily increase crop yield Plantation agriculture: cash crops Primarily in less-developed countries Increased use of greenhouses to raise crops/Aquifer depletion Integrated pest management Overgrazing Efficient irrigation Perennial crops Loss of biodiversity and agrobiodiversity Crop rotation Fossil fuel use Overfishing Water-efficient crops Greenhouse gas emissions Soil/


Basics of Farm Management for Vegetable Growers Jayson K. Harper Professor of agricultural economics Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology.

system for vegetables Choosing an irrigation systems for tree fruit Scheduling irrigation Drip Irrigation for Vegetable Production Advantages of drip irrigation Disadvantages and limitations of drip irrigation Drip irrigation system components –delivery systems –filters –pressure regulators –valves and gauges –water management Equipment use and maintenance Multi-Peril Crop Insurance (MPCI) drought excess rain excess wind fire freeze hail tornado earthquake insects disease wildlife/


Food, Soil, and Pest Management Chapter 12. Soil: the foundation for agriculture  Land devoted to agriculture covers 38% of Earth’s land surface  Agriculture.

 The FAO’s Farmer-Centered Agricultural Resource Management Program (FAR)… Helps farmers duplicate agricultural success stories Uses/production Industrialized Crop Production Relies on High-Input Monocultures  Industrialized agriculture, high-input agriculture Goal is to steadily increase crop yield Plantation agriculture: cash crops Increased use of greenhouses to raise crops A Closer Look at Industrialized Crop Production  Green Revolution: increase crop yields Monocultures of high-yield key crops/


Crop*A*Syst Training Allen Krizek Roberta Dow Christina Curell Fred Springborn Josh Appleby Marilyn Thelen.

Production Management Charlie Arnot, CEO Center for Food Integrit (40 minutes; one credit) Today’s Food-What is the Ethical Choice? Today’s Food-What is the Ethical Choice? Crop*A*Syst training HO2 51.8 acres Crop*A*Syst training 1.03) Do you maintain the soil pH in the desirable range for the crop(s) being grown? Crop*A*Syst training Rotation  alfalfa–corn/


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