Ppt on academic pressure on students

Advocacy Project Closing the Achievement Gap with 6 th grade Academic Intervention Group.

student population  Have higher percentage of students failing within own racial/ethnic category than White and Asian students  Disproportionately failing academically in comparison to White and Asian student groups.  Target Population: Students of color on the “D & E List” Needs Assessment  Domain: Academic  Given to:  36 students  All 6 th grade students on/Under Pressure Activity (Breathing)  Introduce “Seven Test-Taking Strategies” - handout  Goal-setting Week 2: Performing Under Pressure Breath/


Students’ expectations “Today’s students expect of colleges and universities what they demand elsewhere: better service, lower costs, higher quality, and.

expansion calls for restructuring of HE involving privatization of HE, corporatization of public universities, implementation of student fees and formation of strategic partnerships between public and private sectors. Market forces led to more entrepreneurial/public and social expenditure on universities. Universities need to seek alternative sources of funding. Universities need to be more market oriented, flexible and able to respond quickly to market signals and pressures. Academic leaders have to find/


SANKOFA: Learning From The Past HIV/AIDS Prevention for African American College Students Angela Farris Watkins, PhD Spelman College CHAMPS Annual Meeting–

students enrolled in PSY 200b over 7 academic semesters; total- 430 (pre = 221, post = 209) statistical analyses were run to assess changes in attitudes within and across semesters on six content areas:statistical analyses were run to assess changes in attitudes within and across semesters on/of six question categories (condom use, HIV/AIDS personal risk, safe sex planning, and partner pressure).Significant findings while minimal in some semesters were found across all content areas except two, peer /


MECD Update Architects have been appointed Issue regarding decanting Materials Pressure to reduce floor area Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre(£60.

Issue regarding decanting Materials Pressure to reduce floor /structures SoM and Materials testing lab MACEMandalUG IC Engines158mx8mControl Room MACEWatkinsUG and Formula Student PG Jet Engines158mx8m. Used on Open Days Control Room / IC Engines MACESmithUG Control Room 5mx5mWindow onto the / Manager Individual officeDirector of Research MACEMcGourlay Academic Group & Project Support 10 approxOpen plan and/or individual spaces Academic disciplines MACEMcGourlay WEB Support2 approxOpen planMECDMcGourlay /


Exploring the challenges of using engagement methodologies with non-traditional students. Ann-marie Steele Sponsored by HEA teaching development grantS.Jones-Devitt.

students that go beyond models of consumption. 2. Produce a prototype Student Engagement Toolkit (SET) 3. Disseminate lessons learned and recommendations that contribute to the on-going flexible pedagogies agenda. PARTICIPANTS part-time students academic staff independent evaluator Meet once/month - lunch Wider stakeholders?? student union student/” “I love the course, but I don’t love the time pressure” “the hardest thing for me is swapping jobs, my world has just been getting to know that, my new job/


School Counselors: We ’ re in the Student Success Business NASAP Annual Conference Tucson, AR June 27, 2009 Greg Brigman, Ph.D. Paul Peluso, Ph.D. Florida.

instruction and summarized research-based strategies for increasing student achievement” Zins, et al. (2004) Reviewed 10 years of research on “The relationship of social and emotional learning to academic success” Student Success Skills: Key Skill Areas Goal setting and progress monitoring Creating a caring, supportive and encouraging classroom Cognitive/Memory skills Performing under pressure: Managing test anxiety Building Healthy Optimism What happens when you teach/


Welcome! The students of EGL 102 section 036 would like to present their research project. We begin with Defining the Problem Kathrine Tubera.

in Lifestyle too difficult Were our hypotheses validated by the research? Binge Drinking/Excessive Partying: Yes Working too many hours: Mixed Results Academically unprepared: Yes Tuition is too expensive: No (Much more research must be done on Transfer Students in this area) Pressure, Depression, Stress, Anxiety: Mixed Results Extracurricular Activities: No Change in Lifestyle is too difficult: Yes Michael Afante Eleni Florakos What are/


The mission of Mahomet- Seymour Junior High School is to provide a respectful, caring and positive environment that fosters the development of academic.

maximum) TRAINING RULES APPLY TO ALL PARTICIPANTS AND ARE IN EFFECT YEAR-ROUND, BOTH ON AND OFF SCHOOL GROUNDS. Please consult the student handbook for details. It is also the participant’s responsibility to insure that they are/ALL PARENTS/ SPECTATORS INVOLVED IN INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITIES: Parent/Spectators will promote academics, and the emotional, physical and moral well being of the student-participants above the desires and pressures to win. Parents/Spectators will teach, enforce, advocate, model and /


Educator Awareness on Issues of Academic Integrity in the K-16 Setting Workshop Addressing Plagiarism in Academic Practice Davina Pruitt-Mentle 2007 C3.

To pass/get good grades (29%) Pressures to succeed (12%) Don’t know answers/understand (9%) Time pressure - too much work, etc. (5%) Other (13%) Source: Center for Academic Integrity study: Student Cheating in American High Schools. Donald L/ 40 Dominic Sisti’s Study: Practical Advice for Educators Offer alternatives to the traditional research paper that capitalizes on students’ preference for electronic communication and creativity –design a web site –multimedia presentation Offer group work Convey a /


The role of Classroom Assistants in supporting overseas students Stephen Hughes Lawand Qadir.

of international students in determining English language competence and support needs before acceptance on to higher education/pressure to "mark positively" to compensate" (Gill, 2008). The role of Classroom Assistants in supporting overseas students  Culture shock:  climate / food  / language / dress  social roles /  rules of behaviour  health emotional concentration The role of Classroom Assistants in supporting overseas students The CA role... Academic support:  support throughout the academic/


10+1 WAYS TO DECREASE PRESSURE BETWEEN THE ACADEMIC SENATE AND THE CURRICULUM COMMITTEES Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Chair, ASCCC Curriculum Committee, Mt.

are determined by the academic senate, either solely or in partnership with the board.  Because of this required senate oversight, there must be a direct link between the curriculum committee and the senate.” PRESSURE COOKER TOPICS  What is going on between your senate and /has a voice 4. Set up processes before bad things happen 5. Appeal Process can’t hurt 6. Ignore personalities – focus on the student 7. Look for common ground 8. There are two sides to every story 9. Be ok with conflict 10. Respect is/


MAKING The First Year Matter MAKING The First Year Matter Fulfilling the Promise of Graduating Student at HBCUs by presented by: Dr. Henrietta Augustus.

with respect to the First Year Experience?  Academic Advising of 1 st Year Students * More intentional recruitment and selection of advisors who are committed to advising first year students * Better professional preparation and development of advisors * More reward and recognition of effective advising and * More conscientious assessment of advisors and advisement programs  Look at pressure on First Year Students to make early decisions about their college/


First -year students’ experiences of peer groups and peer pressure living in the residences of a South African University. Ms. Vuyo Mntuyedwa PhD: Preliminary.

states that students learn by modelling or imitation from one another Student involvement theory by Austin (1985).  This theory mentioned the fact that, student become more active if they involved themselves in the university programs; academically and /%: competitive in sport 5/3/201512 Effects of peer pressure 91% - changing of their religious values 89% :dating more partners 86.4% : dependency on friends and approval 81.4%: influence on joining student leadership 80.4% :changing of interests 5/3/201513/


Directorate for Joint Force Development (J-7), The Joint Staff

M. (2008). The Effects of Class Size on Student Grades at a Public University. Economics of Education Review, 27(2), 221-233. doi: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2006.09.011 McKeachie, W. J. (1980). Class Size, Large Classes, and Multiple Sections. Academe, 66(1), 24-27. National Council /. It is fine as is. JPME Senior Level Colleges Survey Cont’d USAWC AWC CNW MCWAR 11. Is there pressure from your parent organization to raise the ratio Yes. 8:1 or seminar Moderate: Alternatives considered including Navy Model which/


Race to the Top: Examining Predictors of Competition among First-Year Science Students Sylvia Hurtado Kevin Eagan Josephine Gasiewski Minh Tran Higher.

characteristics and pre-college experiences Participated in pre-college research program (+) Chose college b/c had good academic rep (+) Social self-confidence (+) Sense of science identity (+) Academic self-confidence (-)  Disciplinary differences (all compared to psychology) Life science (+) Physical science (+) Health / thinks that you’re dumb.” (Female student, PWI) “I feel like there’s a lot of pressure to…it seems like there’s a lot of pressure or I put a lot of pressure on myself to…I feel bad if I /


Promoting a culture of academic awareness and honesty :developing an institutional ‘good academic practices’ website and understanding how student can.

across HE sector in general –‘blame’ commonly attributed to misuse of the internet –time pressures –internationalisation and globalisation issues –changing social cultures concern as to whether ‘average’ UKOU students are more or less at risk of poor academic practice than conventional campus-based peers –UKOU students: distance, online learning –studying part time and balancing study and life/work demands –typically adult learners returning to/


O NE C LASS, M ANY D IRECTIONS : E XPLORATION IN THE C LASSROOM Tiffany Fritz Academic Advisor and ALS 114 Coordinator Oregon State University.

74 students Percentage of the class coded as UESP: 62% Decide and act Explore academic & career options Assess yourself P HILOSOPHY : C AREER D ECISION MAKING M ODEL C AREER D ECISION M AKING C ONTINUUM Very Decided Tentatively Decided UndecidedSeriously Undecided Indecisive You know! Confident, beginning to implement In Process! Perhaps feeling pressure to /Lecture? Who do you have teaching the class? What office/department/college is supporting the course? Q UESTIONS ? W HAT ARE YOU DOING ON YOUR CAMPUS ?


Transforming the School Counseling Profession, 3e © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter Sixteen Helping Students With Mental and.

School Counseling Profession, 3e Erford © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 16-2 Helping Students The professional school counselor’s primary responsibility is to help students learn. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and school reform movement has increased the pressure to focus on academic achievement for all students. Environment and mental health issues affect an increasing number of children and are affecting/


Unit Eight College Life. Secrets of Straight-A Students Text A.

Is it really necessary to conduct experiments on animals? conduct a meeting 主持会议 conduct an investigation 进行调查 Collocation: conduct: vt. Paragraph 2: The students at the top of the class attain academic excellence by mastering a few basic / 研究 Collocation: Dr White undertook the task of writing a comprehensive English dictionary. undertake: v. Words and Expressions: pressure: Inflationary pressures will lead to higher prices. 1. n. the influence or effect of someone or something; the feeling of stressful/


Health Is Academic: Promoting Health and Educational Success for Young People Division of Adolescent and School Health.

to youth in the 1990s, are today’s youth doing better or worse on each of the key risk behaviors?  Unhealthy dietary behaviors  Inadequate physical activity/have 1 or more heart disease risk factors (e.g., high cholesterol, blood pressure, insulin)? C)60% Q7. The obesity epidemic has been linked with the unprecedented/of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) Health is Academic Because…  School health programs can help improve students’ educational outcomes  Helping young people stay healthy is /


Presented By: Jonathan M. Bolding. Did you know low-income students of color tend to feel less “connected” to their schools than affluent and Anglo students?

academic learning, but also the other qualities essential to social and civic participation.  Fostering community within a school does not occur without creating community within each individual classroom. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Discussion  On the paper provided list ways in which you engage your students/ of the brain.  Listening to music engages the entire brain.  Music directly effects pulse rate, blood pressure, the nervous system, and glands of the body.  It can be used for arousal, a carrier of/


1 P sychological challenges facing MSc students This powerpoint has been designed to offer advice and guidance to MSc students. The format of the Workshop.

keep previous standards Adjusting reading strategies Presentations, essays and exams The tutor relationship Sustained pressure during a 1 year course 5 Academic challenges Feeling overwhelmed with material Adapting to a new style of learning Needing time/ Urgent appointments (phone early in the day) See Website forWebsite Stress management handouts Self help resources on a wide range of student issues (study – related and personal difficulties) Relaxation MP3’s 33 Forthcoming Groups Stress Management Group /


CHAPTER 17: Helping Students With Mental and Emotional Disorders Transforming The School Counseling Profession Fourth Edition Bradley T. Erford.

Edition. © 2015,2011,2007,2003 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 1-2 Helping Students The professional school counselor’s primary responsibility is to help students learn. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and school reform movement has increased the pressure to focus on academic achievement for all students. Environment and mental health issues affect an increasing number of children and are affecting/


AfricaArray: Establishing an academic programme Paul Dirks, Head, School of Geosciences, Wits University, Johannesburg, South Africa IRIS Worskhop, Boston,

Africa –Competition for well-trained scientist - affecting academic and gov’t institutions –Aging scientific population South African government’s willingness to engage and invest Brain drain Financial pressures – closure of specialist training programs Booming Natural /across Africa - Run by Wits and Penn State Expand recruitment base High-quality hands-on training Intercultural exchange Cost-effective STEP 3b: START Attract students: -broaden intake levels (PHYS; APPLIED MATH; MATH; COMP; GEOS) -Broaden /


Educator Awareness on Issues of Academic Integrity in the K-16 Setting Workshop Addressing Plagiarism in Academic Practice Davina Pruitt-Mentle 2007 C3.

To pass/get good grades (29%) Pressures to succeed (12%) Don’t know answers/understand (9%) Time pressure - too much work, etc. (5%) Other (13%) Source: Center for Academic Integrity study: Student Cheating in American High Schools. Donald L/ 39 Dominic Sisti’s Study: Practical Advice for Educators Offer alternatives to the traditional research paper that capitalizes on students’ preference for electronic communication and creativity –design a web site –multimedia presentation Offer group work Convey a /


Remark Case Study Student Survey Results Prepared by the Evaluation Support Group, Inc. Jerry Bean, PhD.

Sex Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use Academic Self-Efficacy The perception of a student that he/she can perform academically Academic self-efficacy is a key determinant of a student’s academic success Academic Self-Efficacy Items Academic Self-Efficacy Items by Gender Boys and / Can come from a variety of experiences in a student’s life Sources and Ratings of Stress Top 5 Stressors –Multiple projects due in one week –Overall feelings of stress –Overall pressure of school work –Multiple tests in one day /


Education. Education Formal education – formal academic studies and schools Formal education – formal academic studies and schools It can also refer to.

much pressure for their students to achieve a specific score that they do end up teaching to the test, whether they want to or not. This can make school drudgery for students and steal teachers’ enjoyment of teaching. Schools cut down on non essential subjects or play time. This can have negative impact on children’s social, emotional, and academic well-being. Schools cut down on non/


THE VOICE OF HIGHER EDUCATION LEADERSHIP 1 Presentation to the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training COMMITTEE ROOM E249,

.If the college sector fails to expand significantly, this will continue to put undue pressure on HEIs to admit students without the necessary resources and capacity. 4.Whilst access imperatives remain relevant, HEIs are under pressure to improve their student success rates – this is where emphasis should be placed. 5.HEIs are doing a lot, on their own, to support academically deserving students, who are in financial need.


Student Athletes Presented by: Caroline Falk, Matt Jarmon, Gwen Kenny, Denise Stewart.

. Ayers, K., Pazmino-Cevallos, M., & Dobose, C. (2012). The 20-Hour Rule: Student- Athletes Time Commitment to Athletics and Academics. Virginia Journal, 33 (1), 22-26. Chen, S., Snyder, S., and Magner, M., (2010). Journal of Issues in Intercollegiate Athletics, “The Effects of Sports Participation on Student Athletes’ and Non-Athlete Student’s Social Life and Identity,” http://csri- jiia.org/documents/puclications/research_articles/2010/


Effect of Peer Pressure on Academic Performance STUDENT RESEARCHERS: CARLOS ACOSTA PRIYA DAMES MIRANDA DUNN ANISSIA ENNIS AMANDA WADE.

Effect of Peer Pressure on Academic Performance STUDENT RESEARCHERS: CARLOS ACOSTA PRIYA DAMES MIRANDA DUNN ANISSIA ENNIS AMANDA WADE Introduction  Our interests were with elementary school-aged students, but given the need to protect them from potentially harmful survey questions, we were redirected to our peer group.  We started out with more than 10 ideas after a brainstorming (/


Department of Higher Education and Training Funding of the Post-School Education and Training Sector Standing Committee on Appropriations 4 November 2015.

million in CET colleges by 2030 The number of Grade 12 learners estimated to (academically) gain entrance into a university will increase from 172 000 in 2013 to about 250 000 by 2019, increasing pressure on universities to expand. Constitutes approximately 30% of NSC students each year The remaining school leaving students (70%) must be catered for through other public post-school opportunities, i.e/


Helping Students With Mental and Emotional Disorders CHAPTER 17.

. ◦The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and school reform movement has increased the pressure to focus on academic achievement for all students. Environment and mental health issues affect an increasing number of children and are affecting student achievement, which makes it difficult for schools to provide an appropriate education for each child. Prevalence of Mental Disorders and Mental Health Issues in Children and/


Department of Higher Education and Training Annual Performance Plan (2016/17) Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training.

risks associated with student fee increases and the operational staff costs at institutions Key Budget Pressures Facing the Department 18 Operational Pressures: -The capping of compensation of employees is still placing a burden on the ability to / BRICS Think Tank and participative academic forum and report progress on partnerships annually Performance Indicator2016/17 Target Partnership reports produced and approved per annum (n) A report on the 2016 BRICS Academic Forum and Think Tank partnerships /


1 Academic Libraries. 2 Excerpts from: “Trends in U.S. Academic Libraries” Paula Kaufman, University Librarian University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign.

public universities Economic conditions driving lower support from states Rapidly rising energy costs put pressure on available funds More ethnic and racial diversity Undergraduate research 4 More Trends Global competition for students reducing number of international students going to U.S. interdisciplinarity Online learning continues to grow Demands for accountability 5 Academic Leadership University leaders have short tenures (typically less than 5 years) No university/


 The roles of teacher and student should have been and always will be ever-changing roles. “Not only do teachers need to possess twenty first century.

continuous improvement” (Newman, 2013). The No Child Left Behind Legislation was supposed to help students who are falling behind academically but its accountability measures have placed unnecessary pressure on the schools, the teachers and the students. Some schools have completely dismissed their curriculum to address the standards provided so that their students will be prepared to take their grade level test at the end of the/


1 Student mental health: resources and environmental stressors influencing the emotional health of UCLAN students Sue Hacking Department of Nursing West.

the Department for Arts and Fashion and another contrasting department to assess the relative prevalence and level of mental health needs and students’ perceptions of academic pressure Survey of staff to assess perceptions of student mental health and pressure on staff and students 3 The questionnaire measures Clinical Outcomes for Routine Evaluation (CORE system group 1998 University of Leeds) –34 items grouped into four scales subjective wellbeing/


Diversification in the Academic Workforce: The Case of the U.S. & Implications for Europe Martin J Finkelstein Seton Hall University U.S.A.

a surge in demand for faculty in response to continuing expansion of traditional student demand – albeit warning of the unpredictable effects of the new digital /academic management, re- inforcing local discretion in academic appointments and workload --albeit usually within specified national parameters –the sort of decentralization (although not quite as radical ) that in the U.S. has led to innovative staffing configurations and their rapid spread through the system; A trend toward increasing pressures on/


Caught in the Middle with Interventions: Innovative Solutions for Every Student Montevallo Middle School Shelby County School District Presenters: Mr.

the second month of school. Each student is a COT member. Students identify their top 3 COT choices (on a form) during the first week of school (during advisory). COTs Students not meeting academic standards (failing grades) do not attend/ instead of punitive culture Privilege Cards Benefits Rewards students for displaying the right behavior and attitude Teaches responsibility Generates enthusiasm and positive peer pressure Challenges What to do when student loses card When the 3 punches are gone for/


1 Plagiarism and how to avoid it Stephen Bostock and Mike Brough September 2005 Keele University International Postgraduate Students Induction.

aids detection 7 Collaboration and collusion Collaboration is encouraged even in preparation for individual assessed writing: Academic discussion, prewriting, sharing sources, peer review, copy editing Collusion is shared work, claimed to/in the past) Cultural differences More time pressure on some students; part-time working More pressure on some students to get a good qualification Intention to deceive (cheating) 13 International students International students are (statistically) more likely to be caught/


Reducing plagiarism through effective teaching and learning strategies A workshop developed for Bilkent University by Gordon Suddaby Supporting academic.

A workshop developed for Bilkent University by Gordon Suddaby Supporting academic integrity Gordon Suddaby - g.t.suddaby@massey.ac.nz Overview In recent years, plagiarism has become an increasingly prominent issue in higher education and the three contributing factors are probably; growth in student numbers (and the related rise in the student/staff ratio) pressure on students time and balancing study with work to support their/


Supporting the development of academic literacy in first year Education and Early Childhood Studies students Amanda French Karen Clarke Wolverhampton University.

academic literacy in first year Education and Early Childhood Studies students Amanda French Karen Clarke Wolverhampton University Background to project This paper draws on a project which is part of the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) at Wolverhampton University. This paper draws on/several times). Use of abbreviations This issue may have arisen because students were writing under pressure but I have noticed it a lot when marking students work so feel that it is something a lot of them/


UC Irvine Academic Health Center Strategic Plan FY August 2010

that includes members of all 4 medical school classes to enhance communication across classes and facilitate senior students mentoring junior students. Create a society focused on global health; increase clinical and research opportunities with medical schools around the world for both medical students, graduate students and junior faculty. Attach academic societies to an existing research-oriented structure (e.g., Cancer Center, Immunology Institute). 55 Theme IV/


© 2003 - LCX Corporation - Proprietary and Confidential Information Managing the Growing Demand for Digital Learning Content If You Give A Student A Computer:

Text Linear Video Audio Digital Images Software tools Simulations On-line Testing Online Research Resources Tutorials Animations Interactive Video /page (vs. 10% in 1996) Under significant budget pressure –Public institutions experiencing academic computing budget cuts 55% of public universities 43% of / – connecting to the publishing world –Student system – student/faculty authentication and role confirmation –Student finance system – student purchase accounts –Institutional finance system – publisher/


Downingtown Area School District Downingtown, PA

on student performance on the state PSSA exam in the fall of 2011). Board Goal School Board Goal 2011-12 and renewed for 2012-13: Work purposefully toward enhancing the mental, social, emotional, and physical health of staff and students in order to achieve higher student academic/diet, lack of exercise) accounted for 12% of claims Group prescription claims showed: High blood pressure, heart disease diabetes Addressing the Issues Committee goals: Increase awareness of lifestyle choices and encourage overall /


Evaluating the impact of student number controls, choice and competition on the changing HE landscape Dr Colin McCaig and Dr Carol Taylor Sheffield Hallam.

languages) Why? maintain / protect widening participation and other mission goals (within core SNC) pressure to expand their ABB+ margin has constrained their ability to widen participation within core Institutional / trick that’s missed, even though the data emerging on student decision making is indicating that they’re not making decisions/which is much hungrier than ever before and not just about the academic brand, the academic reputation.... I think branding could be considered almost like an algorithm /


Underachievement and the Gifted Suzanne Myers-Laird, MS Ed. Waukee Academic Boosters 1/13/09.

on gifted students who begin to underachieve. The reverse is true as well. One study showed that 66% of high ability students named peer pressure as the primary force against getting good grades.High-achieving peers have a positive influence on gifted students/ together) –Encourage extra-curricular activities –Maintain a positive attitude toward your child, even in the face of academic failure –Remain calm, consistent, and objective during the underachievement situation What can we do? Rimm’s TRIFOCAL /


Honesty Matters: Strategies for Fostering Academic Integrity Ms. Deborah C. Bell Director for Academic Honesty Mr. Hunt Revell Coordinator.

Modified Decision Upheld Appeal to USG Board of Regents Sanctions: Level 1 – Determined by instructor & student (* Subject to student’s 5-day right of rescission) Level 2 – “0” on assignment(s) & at least one of the following:  “F” in course  Transcript / (???)  94% of students were aware of the academic honesty policy, yet 33% claimed they were unaware their action was a violation  Another 13% claimed they did not understand citation rules, and 18% “felt forced or pressured into agreeing” to a violation/


Panel 1 Prevention of Irregularities in Academic Testing Panelists Audrey Amrein-Beardsley: Arizona State University Gregory J. Cizek: University of North.

of sanctions – E.g., erasing and changing students’ test answers, filling in bubbles left blank, overtly and covertly providing correct answers on tests, falsifying student ID numbers, excluding/suspending students with poor academic performance Cheating in the Second Degree – often more/ best educational interests of the children. – Particularly in our highest-needs schools Conclusions When pressured to do well on high-stakes tests, educators engage in quite clever practices, besides just teaching well, to/


Academic Integrity at Trinity and Across the Nation A Report Prepared for the Trinity Community* March 15, 2002 by C. Mackenzie Brown Chair of Academic.

on small assignments (7%) Why Students Cheat Lazy/don’t study/didn’t prepare (32%) To pass/get good grades (29%) Pressures to succeed (12%) Don’t know answers/understand (9%) Time pressure /Students who have seen other students cheat at least once on an exam [62%] 50% [down from 62% in 1990] Students who have reported another student cheating 6% Students who feel that students at Trinity should be held responsible for monitoring the academic integrity of other students 36% (mildly or strongly agree) Students/


The link between an academic library and student retention: a case study Ms Este Retief Dr Buhle Mbambo-Thata 2008.

institutions Meet social transformation Meet skills needs of the new South Africa Improve policies Increase demographic representation among graduates Improve academic performance Increasing pressure on HE institutions Reduce demographic difference between student intake and graduate throughput Align demographic composition of tertiary teaching staff with that of tertiary learners Transparency Accountability Jaffer, Ng’ambi & Czerniewicz (2007) Previous: Funding linked to the number of /


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