Gastric anatomy and physiology ppt on cells

The Digestive System and Metabolism Muse 2440 lecture #7 2/29/12.

Gastric Glands  In fundus and body of stomach  Extend deep into underlying lamina propria  Each gastric pit communicates with several gastric glands  Parietal cells  Chief cells / duodenal ampulla The Liver Figure 24–21 The Gallbladder and Bile Ducts. The Liver The Physiology of the Liver 1.Metabolic regulation 2.Hematological regulation /23a The Gross Anatomy and Regions of the Large Intestine. The Large Intestine  Histology of the Large Intestine  Lack villi  Abundance of mucous cells  Presence of/


The Gastrointestinal Tract and Nutrition New Material for Test 2.

of passage depends largely on the nutrient composition of the ration - initial stage of digestion is provided by gastric secretions Anatomy of Digestive System Stomach hormones –Gastrin release from pyloric cells –Release caused by stomach distension and/or presence of protein –Stimulates acid and pepsinogen secretion and gastric motility Anatomy of Digestive System Digestion is more complete when stomach is not completely full - two types of motility: 1/


Chapter 10 Airway Management. National EMS Education Standard Competencies (1 of 6) Airway Management, Respiration, and Artificial Ventilation Applies.

Anatomy of the Lower Airway (6 of 6) The mediastinum—the space between the lungs—contains: –Heart –Great vessels –Esophagus –Trachea –Major bronchi –Many nerves Physiology of Breathing (1 of 2) The respiratory and cardiovascular systems work together. –Ensure a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients is delivered to cells –Remove carbon dioxide and waste products Physiology/into the stomach, causing gastric distention. Assisted and Artificial Ventilation (8 of 17) Mouth-to-mouth and mouth-to-mask ventilation/


The Digestive System and Body Metabolism Chapter 14.

Pharynx Physiology Esophagus Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy –About 10 inches long –Runs from pharynx to stomach through the diaphragm Physiology –/cells Gastric pits are formed by folded mucosa which leads into gastric glands –Mucous neck cells - Produce alkaline mucus –Which protects the stomach wall from being damaged by acids and enzymes –Gastric glands – secrete gastric juice –Chief cells – produce protein-digesting enzymes (pepsinogens) –Parietal cells – produce hydrochloric acid –Enteroendocrine cells/


Nesidioblastosis After Gastric-Bypass Surgery Heidi Chamberlain Shea, MD Endocrine Associates of Dallas.

Endogenous hyperinsulinism Insulinoma Auto-antibodies to insulin or the β-cell Functional β-cell disorder Beta-cell Function SUR 1 (Kir 6.2) Glutamate GDH /Incidence Male = Female Obese and lean Age 11 to 84 years Questions Does altering gastric anatomy result in hyperinsulinemia hypoglycemia? Does altering gastric anatomy result in hyperinsulinemia hypoglycemia? Is/incontinence Bariatric Surgery Physiology Dixon et al., JCEM 2005, 90(2):813-19 Banded N=17 Control N=17 Bariatric Surgery Physiology 0700 0900 /


Digestive System Physiology Spring 2015. © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Six Functions of the Digestive System 1.Ingestion Food enters mouth 2.Mechanical.

muscle Mucosa Muscularis mucosae Muscularis externa Circular muscle Serosa © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Figure 16-8d The Anatomy of the Stomach. Lamina propria Mucous cells Neck Gastric pit Gastric gland This diagram of a gastric gland shows the sites of parietal cells and chief cells. Cells of Gastric Glands Parietal cells G cell Chief cells Smooth muscle cell © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Digestion in the Stomach Pepsin initiates protein digestion to small peptides Salivary/


The Digestive System Abbreviated. The Digestive System Functions  Ingestion—taking in food  Digestion—breaking food down both physically and chemically.

14.4a Stomach Anatomy Figure 14.4b Stomach Anatomy Figure 14.5a Stomach Physiology  Temporary storage tank for food  Site of food breakdown  Chemical breakdown of protein begins  Delivers chyme (processed food) to the small intestine Structure of the Stomach Mucosa  Mucosa is simple columnar epithelium  Mucous neck cells—produce a sticky alkaline mucus  Gastric glands—situated in gastric pits and secrete gastric juice  Chief cells—produce protein-digesting/


Chapter 24, part 1 The Digestive System.

of the J Pylorus – antrum and pyloric canal adjacent to the duodenum Stomach anatomy Phloric Sphincter Guards exit from stomach Rugae Ridges and folds in relaxed stomach Figure 24.12 The Stomach Figure 24.12b Histology of the stomach Gastric glands Parietal cells Intrinsic factor, and HCl Chief cells Pepsinogen Pyloric glands Mucous secretion containing several hormones Enteroendocrine cells G cells secrete gastrin D cells secrete somatostatin Figure 24.13/


Principles of Anatomy and Physiology

Principles of Anatomy and Physiology Thirteenth Edition Gerard J. Tortora • Bryan H. Derrickson Chapter 24 The Digestive System Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Mouth (oral cavity) contains teeth and tongue Parotid gland (salivary gland) Sublingual gland (salivary gland) Submandibular gland (salivary gland) Pharynx Esophagus Stomach Liver Pancreas Duodenum Transverse colon Gallbladder Descending colon Jejunum Sigmoid colon Ascending colon Rectum /


Investigations  Stratification Front Line Clinical Applications New Frontiers and Emerging Treatment Paradigms for Optimizing Management of Obesity Focus.

POMC neurons are physiologically important in regulating hepatic glucose production and insulin sensitivity ► /Cells Leptin Model of the Arcuate Nucleus Model showing the afferent signals from the periphery that modulate the activity of hypothalamic neurons in a reciprocal way to increase or decrease food intake Badman, Science 2005 Controlled System Controller Afferent Signals Efferent Controls Fat Anatomy/9%) Gastric bypass – 51 lbs. (22.0%) weight loss over 1 year (58.8% excess weight loss)Gastric bypass /


Anatomy and Physiology. Skeletal System Introduction to the Skeletal System Humans are vertebrates, animals having a vertabral column or backbone. They.

Anatomy and Physiology Skeletal System Introduction to the Skeletal System Humans are vertebrates, animals having a vertabral column or backbone. They rely on a sturdy internal frame that is centered on a prominent spine. The human skeletal system consists of bones, cartilage, ligaments and tendons and accounts for about 20 percent of the body weight. The living bones in our bodies use oxygen and give off waste/


Chapter 9 Airway Management. Introduction (1 of 2) When the ability to breathe is disrupted: –Oxygen delivery to tissues and cells is compromised. –Vital.

Anatomy of the Lower Airway (6 of 6) The mediastinum is the space between the lungs, containing: –Heart –Great vessels –Esophagus –Trachea –Major bronchi –Many nerves Physiology of Breathing (1 of 2) Respiratory and cardiovascular systems work together. –Ensure a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients are delivered to cells –Remove carbon dioxide and waste products Physiology/ the stomach, causing gastric distention. Assisted and Artificial Ventilation (10 of 18) Mouth-to-mouth and mouth-to-mask ventilation/


Anatomy/Physiology Definition of terms: Anterior (cranial)toward the head Posterior (caudal)toward the tail Cranialhead region Caudalpertaining to the.

by duct to the esophagus (surface feeding?) Anatomy/physiology Circulatory system: Blood and lymph systems –Blood: Fluid tissue – liquid plasma and cellular components Plasma: 80% water –Proteins and carbohydrates –Waste materials (urea and uric acid) –Mineral salts –Enzyme secretions from glands –Antibodies Anatomy/physiology Blood cells –Red cells (erythrocytes) Flattened, nucleated cells with hemoglobin –White cells (leukocytes) –Thrombocytes: Present in blood and aid in formation of blood clots Blood/


24-1 The Digestive System Mouth---bite, chew, swallow Pharynx and esophagus---- transport Stomach----mechanical disruption; absorption of water & alcohol.

muscle 24-25 Physiology of the Esophagus - /cells epithelial cells form columns of secretory cells = gastric glands that line narrow channels called gastric pits glands - for the secretion of gastric juice mix of water, HCl, enzymes and hormones 24-29 Gastric Mucosa Hydrochloric acid (parietal cells) converts Pepsinogen (from chief cells) to the enzyme pepsin = protein digestion HCl from the parietal cells is secreted as H+ and/ –deoxyribonuclease 24-62 Anatomy of the Liver and Gallbladder Liver –weighs /


Pages 2-7 © 2015 Pearson Education, Inc.. Anatomy vs. Physiology Differentiate between the two… Anatomy is about the structure Physiology is about the.

and accessory organs. Mouth (oral cavity) Tongue Esophagus Parotid gland Sublingual gland Submandibular gland Salivary glands Pharynx Stomach Pancreas (Spleen) Transverse colon Descending colon Ascending colon Cecum Sigmoid colon Rectum Appendix Anal canal Anus Small intestine Duodenum Jejunum Ileum Liver Gallbladder Large intestine Figure 14.4c Anatomy of the stomach. Pyloric sphincter Gastric pits Gastric pit Gastric gland Surface epithelium Mucous neck cells Parietal cells Gastric glands Chief cells/


Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Revised 4/2014 Elaine N. Marieb Chapter.

Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Revised 4/2014 Elaine N. Marieb Chapter 14 The Digestive System and Body Metabolism Organs of the Digestive System Slide 14.2b Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 14.1 Mouth Why is the epithelium on the gums, hard palate, and dorsal surface of tongue keratinized? Why/


So far I finished lecture 1-7 Lectures 8-12 are coming. Lecture 3 – I cut and pasted slides I thought might be important There are __ total slides. There.

Syndrome: <1% of pts  Triad- gastric acid hypersecretion, severe PUD and non-Beta cell tumor of the pancreas Caused by gastrin secreting / events  Demeester Score (Normal < 18-20) 159 Esophageal Manometry  Used to evaluate the physiology of the esophagus  Determines if there are any esophageal motility disorders  Helpful in evaluating the / (K+) 2. Venous drainage to the small bowel 219 Vascular Anatomy Venous outflow = portal vein and liver -Arcades  drain into SMV (parallel to SMA)  splenic vein (under/


Chapter 14 The Digestive System and Body Metabolism

as Benjamin Cummings Stomach Anatomy Layers of peritoneum attached to the stomach Lesser omentum – attaches the liver to the lesser curvature Greater omentum – attaches the greater curvature to the posterior body wall Contains fat to insulate, cushion, and protect abdominal organs Slide 14.16b Structure of the Stomach Mucosa Gastric pits formed by folded mucosa Glands and specialized cells are in the gastric gland region Slide/


Anatomy and physiology of GIT

Anatomy and physiology of GIT Foregut Midgut Hindgut Coeliac artery Superior mesenteric artery Pharynx to duodenum Superior mesenteric artery Midgut Duodenum to first 2/3 of transverse colon Inferior mesenteric artery Hindgut Last 1/3 of transverse colon to upper half of anal canal Accessory digestive organs Teeth Tongue Salivary glands Liver Gallbladder Pancreas Nerve: Ant + post gastric nerves (vagi) , sympathetic branches of thoracic trunk/


Pediatric Anatomy and Physiology

is deficient in type 1 muscle cells These cells are required for continuous, repeated exercise activities Pediatric Anatomy/Physiology Respiratory System Pediatric airway Lungs Maturation not complete until age 8 Alveoli grow and increase in number to age / and swallowing until then Gastric pH and volume are close to adult range by 2nd day of life Gastric pH is alkalotic at delivery Pediatric Anatomy/Physiology Pharmacologic considerations Uptake Route of administration affects uptake IV – fastest Oral and /


Chapter 23B Digestive System Slides by Barbara Heard and W. Rose.

Inc. Enlarged view of gastric pits and gastric glands Figure 23.15b Microscopic anatomy of the stomach. Gastric pits Surface epithelium (mucous cells) Gastric pit Mucous neck cells Parietal cell Gastric gland Chief cell Enteroendocrine cell Enlarged view of gastric pits and gastric glands © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Location of the HCl-producing parietal cells Figure 23.15c Microscopic anatomy of the stomach. Pepsinogen Pepsin HCI Mitochondria Parietal cell Chief cell Enteroendocrine cell Location of the/


Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy There are three types of endoscopy looking at the upper GI and pancreaticobiliary tracts.

/3, hepatic metastases in increasing extent Early gastric cancer Key revision points anatomy and physiology of the stomach The fundus is predominantly a storage zone with few active cells The body contains mostly chief cells (secrete pepsinogen; stimulated by gastrin and local ACh release) and oxyntic cells (secrete H + ; stimulated by gastrin, histamine, and ACh; inhibited by H +, secretin, and GIP) The antrum contains G cells (secrete gastrin; stimulated by ACh from/


Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slides 14.15 – 14.32 Seventh Edition.

Anatomy & Physiology Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slides 14.15 – 14.32 Seventh Edition Elaine N. Marieb Chapter 14 The Digestive System and Body Metabolism Lecture Slides in PowerPoint by Jerry L. Cook Stomach Anatomy Slide/14.20a Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings  Gastric pits formed by folded mucosa  Glands and specialized cells are in the gastric gland region Structure of the Stomach Mucosa Slide 14.20b Copyright © 2003 /


Chapter 5 Care of the Patient with a Gastrointestinal Disorder Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.

Anatomy and Physiology Digestive system (Alimentary canal)  Organs and their functions Mouth: Beginning of digestion Teeth: Bite, crush, and grind food Salivary glands: Secrete saliva Esophagus: Moves food from mouth to stomach Stomach: Churn and mix contents with gastric juices Small intestine: Most digestion occurs here Large intestine: Forms and/ Inc. All rights reserved. Energy for Fuel (p. 73)  Mitochondria of cells is where metabolism takes place  Two forms of metabolism  Catabolism: breaking down /


Introduction To Anatomy & Physiology  Characteristics of Living Things  The Sciences of Anatomy & Physiology  Levels of Organization  Introduction.

/molecular processes within cells & chemical interaction between cells. Ex: stem cell research; oncology research. Special Physiology:   Study of the physiology of specific organs. Ex: cardiac physiology; renal physiology; gastric physiology. Physiological Disciplines Systemic Physiology:   Study of the physiology of specific organ systems. Ex: cardiovascular physiology; respiratory physiology; reproductive physiology. Pathological Physiology:   Study of the effects of diseases on organ and/or organ/


Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Figure 23.1 Alimentary canal and related accessory digestive organs. Mouth (oral cavity) Tongue Esophagus Liver.

stomach. (b) Enlarged view of gastric pits and gastric glands Mucous neck cells Parietal cell Surface epithelium (mucous cells) Gastric pits Chief cell Enteroendocrine cell Gastric pit Gastric gland Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Figure 23.15c Microscopic anatomy of the stomach. (c) Location of the HCl-producing parietal cells and pepsin-secreting chief cells in a gastric gland Pepsinogen Mitochondria Pepsin HCl Chief cell Enteroendocrine cell Parietal cell Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc/


Slide 1 Mosby items and derived items © 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc. Slide 1 EFREN N. AQUINO M.D. Aug. 4, 2009 Care of the Patient with.

These mechanisms involve the circulatory and lymphatic system Slide 3 Mosby items and derived items © 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc. Slide 3 Overview of Anatomy and Physiology Characteristics of blood  Consistency 45% blood cells 55% blood plasma** /of hemoglobin** Hemoglobin level is markedly reduced Excessive iron loss  Caused by chronic bleeding— intestinal, uterine, gastric Slide 68 Mosby items and derived items © 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc. Slide 68 Iron deficiency anemia/


Chapter 23B Digestive System Slides by Barbara Heard and W. Rose. figures from Marieb & Hoehn 9 th ed. Portions copyright Pearson Education.

Education, Inc. Enteroendocrine cell Enlarged view of gastric pits and gastric glands Chief cell Parietal cell Mucous neck cells Surface epithelium (mucous cells) Gastric pits Gastric pit Gastric gland Figure 23.15b Microscopic anatomy of the stomach. © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Figure 23.15c Microscopic anatomy of the stomach. Mitochondria Parietal cell Chief cell Enteroendocrine cell Location of the HCl-producing parietal cells and pepsin-secreting chief cells in a gastric gland HCI Pepsin Pepsinogen/


The Digestive System 16 Chapter 23. Digestive System Two groups of organs 1. Alimentary canal (gastrointestinal or GI tract) Digests and absorbs food.

Anatomy Mucosa – Simple columnar epithelium composed of mucous cells Layer of mucus traps bicarbonate-rich fluid beneath it – Gastric pits lead into gastric glands Figure 23.15b (b) Enlarged view of gastric pits and gastric glands Mucous neck cells Parietal cell Surface epithelium (mucous cells) Gastric pits Chief cell Enteroendocrine cell Gastric pit Gastric gland Gastric Glands Cell types – Mucous neck cells (secrete thin, acidic mucus) – Parietal cells – Chief cells – Enteroendocrine cells Figure/


TREATMENT OF PEPTIC ULCERS & CONTROL OF GASTRIC ACIDITY

PEPTIC ULCERS & CONTROL OF GASTRIC ACIDITY Prof. Riad Agbaria Microscopic Anatomy of the Stomach Four secretory epithelial cells: 1- Mucous cells: secrete an alkaline mucus that protects the epithelium against shear stress and acid 2- Parietal cells: secrete hydrochloric acid! 3- Chief cells: secrete pepsin, a proteolytic enzyme 4- G cells: secrete the hormone gastrin 5-Entrochromaffin-Like Cells (ECL)- HISTAMINE Physiological and pharmacological regulation of gastric secretions: the basis for therapy/


MARC-ANDRE CORNIER, MD - Program Chairman

Lesions Feedback Model Controller Afferent Signals Controls Efferent Fat Anatomy Monoamines Peptides Cytokines Afferent Signals Controls Efferent Fat Controlled / 5-HT2c Hypothalamus Weight Loss Leptin Fat Cells Intestines, Liver, Pancreas and the rest of the body sending up /months (1.3%) Total medical weight loss – 20 lbs. (7.9%) Gastric bypass – 51 lbs. (22.0%) weight loss over 1 year (58./ Obesity is a medical condition with a physiologic and behavioral component like many other chronic medical conditions/


Digestive System Honors Anatomy & Physiology. I.Overview of Digestive System A.Alimentary Canal 1.Continuous, muscular digestive tube 2.Digests – breaks.

highly folded so that it can expand during food ingestion f.Muscle Layers 1)Longitudinal 2)Circular 3)Oblique g.Gastric Glands 1)Parietal – Makes HCl and intrinsic factor 2)Goblet cells – Makes bicarbonate-rich mucus to coat and protect stomach lining 3)Chief cells – makes pepsinogen h.Digestion 1)HCL denatures dietary protein 2)Protein breakdown a)Pepsinogen in presence of HCl is converted/


Chapter 62; pages Lecture 1 Gastrointestinal Physiology

Eleventh Edition Guyton & Hall Published by Elsevier Saunders 2011 Learning Objectives Physiologic Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Wall The General Characteristics of Smooth Muscle and its Function Smooth muscle cell classifications and types of contraction Muscle layers in GI wall Electrical Activity of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Slow Waves and spike potentials Calcium Ions and Muscle Contraction Neural Control of Gastrointestinal Function-Enteric Nervous System Learning Objectives (Cont.) Differences/


19 The Cardiovascular System: Blood Vessels: Part A.

chemical conditions and vasomotor nerves © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Precapillary sphincters Figure 19.4 Anatomy of a/and signs of hypovolemic shock. Initial stimulus Physiological response Signs and symptoms Result Acute bleeding (or other events that reduce blood volume) leads to: 1. Inadequate tissue perfusion resulting in O2 and nutrients to cells 2. Anaerobic metabolism by cells/ Figure 19.29c Veins of the abdomen. Hepatic veins Gastric veins Liver Spleen Inferior vena cava Hepatic portal vein Splenic/


Essential Standard 3.00: Understand anatomy and physiology of agriculture animals.

Standard 3.00: Understand anatomy and physiology of agriculture animals.  Classify anatomy of body systems  Organisms  begin as a single cell ▪ created from the fertilized ovum  As cells divide and grow  they differentiate into/Very little digestive action occurs in omasum  Feed is primarily ground and squeezed  Liquid is removed  Stomach, Abomasum and Proventriculus  breaks down finer feed particles  Gastric juices secreted when feed enters stomach/abomasum/proventriculus ▪ Contain hydrochloric /


CHAPTER 12 WATER AND MINERALS REQUIRED FOR ORAL SOFT TISSUES AND SALIVARY GLANDS Copyright © 2015, 2010, 2005, 1998 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier.

and medium for fluids (blood and lymph), secretions (saliva and gastrointestinal fluids), and excretions (urine and perspiration) Maintains stability of all body fluids, as the principal component and medium for fluids (blood and lymph), secretions (saliva and gastrointestinal fluids), and excretions (urine and perspiration) Enables transport of nutrients to cells and/ to approximately 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily Mosby From Patton KT, Thibodeau GA: Anatomy & Physiology, ed 8. St. Louis: Mosby/


Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Anatomy & Physiology, Sixth Edition Elaine N. Marieb PowerPoint ® Lecture.

a bicarbonate-rich fluid beneath it  Gastric pits contain gastric glands that secrete gastric juice, mucus, and gastrin Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Microscopic Anatomy of the Stomach Figure 23.15 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Gastric glands of the fundus and body have a variety of secretory cells  Mucous neck cells – secrete acid mucus  Parietal cells – secrete HCl Copyright © 2004 Pearson/


Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slides 14.1 – 14.14 Seventh Edition Elaine.

Anatomy & Physiology Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slides 14.1 – 14.14 Seventh Edition Elaine N. Marieb Chapter 14 The Digestive System and Body Metabolism Lecture Slides in PowerPoint by Jerry L. Cook The Digestive System and /.20a Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings  Gastric pits formed by folded mucosa  Glands and specialized cells are in the gastric gland region Structure of the Stomach Mucosa Slide 14.20b Copyright © 2003 /


Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e1 Chapter 26 The Urinary System Lecture Outline.

tubules become riddled with hundreds or thousands of cysts, and inappropriate apoptosis of cells in noncystic tubules leads to progressive impairment of renal function and eventually to renal failure. Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e103 end Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e104 Chapter 27 Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Homeostasis Lecture Outline Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e105 Chapter 27 Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Homeostasis Body fluid –all the water/


24-1 The Digestive System. 24-2 Overview of GI tract Functions Mouth---bite, chew, swallow Pharynx and esophagus---- transport Stomach----mechanical disruption;

and squirt out 1-2 teaspoons full with each wave 24-12 Physiology--Chemical Digestion Protein digestion begins –HCl denatures (unfolds) protein molecules –HCl transforms pepsinogen into pepsin that breaks peptides bonds between certain amino acids Fat digestion continues –gastric lipase breaksdown triglycerides HCl kills microbes in food Mucous cells/ bile salts help digestion by emulsification Phagocytizes worn out blood cells & bacteria 24-19 Anatomy of the Small Intestine 20 feet long----1 inch in /


Human Anatomy and Physiology Secretory functions of the alimentary tract.

Human Anatomy and Physiology Secretory functions of the alimentary tract Secretion from tract Phases of digestion Cephalic: before food enters the stomach Gastric: events in the stomach Intestinal: events in the intestine Saliva Parotid, submandibular, sublingual Secretions initiated in cephalic phase by parasympathetic influence Composition 99.5% water, 0.5% protein and electrolytes Protein: amylase, mucus, lysozyme Functions Water: softens food Amylase: polysaccharide breakdown Mucus: lubrication/


CHAPTER 2 THE ALIMENTARY CANAL: DIGESTION AND ABSORPTION Copyright © 2010, 2005, 1998 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc.

Food Mechanical actions Mechanical actions Break up and mix foods, permitting better blending with the chemicals Break up and mix foods, permitting better blending with the/Anatomy & Physiology, ed 6. St. Louis: Mosby, 2007. 7Copyright © 2010, 2005, 1998 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Process of Nutrition: Stomach Stomach secretions Stomach secretions Chief cells produce pepsinogen Chief cells produce pepsinogen Parietal cells release HCl to make gastric Parietal cells release HCl to make gastric/


Digestive System Part 3 Honors Anatomy & Physiology Chapter 23.

Anatomy & Physiology Chapter 23 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Regulation of Gastric Secretion  Neural and hormonal mechanisms  Gastric mucosa  up to 3 L gastric juice/day  Vagus nerve stimulation  secretion   Sympathetic stimulation  secretion   Hormonal control largely gastrin    Enzyme and HCl secretion  Most small intestine secretions - gastrin antagonists © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Regulation of Gastric Secretion  Three phases of gastric/ Goblet cells  mucus (aids movement of/


Physiology of Digestion Department of Physiology School of Medicine University of Sumatera Utara Dr. Yudi Herlambang Prof dr Abdul Majid Dr Nuraiza Nuraiza.

cells G cells – Secrete gastrin – Gastrin = hormone target tissues = chief cells and parietal cells in stomach target tissues = chief cells and parietal cells in stomach stimulates gastric juice production stimulates gastric juice production – HCL from parietal cells – Pepsinogen from chief cells/.5 mm long Anatomy – Microvilli 1.0 um long Brush border Physiology Two primary function – Digestion – Absorption of nutrients and water Digestion – Mainly in duodenum – small intestine and pancreatic enzymes – /


Stomach and Duodenum Dr Aqeel Shakir Mahmood Assistant Professor Consultant General and Laparoscopic Surgeon FICMS General Surgery CABS General Surgery.

Anatomy Has four regions Cardia Fundus Body Pyloric Surgical importance of blood supply Celiac trunk 1. left gastric artery 2. Splenic artery Left gastroepiploic artery Short gastric artery 3. Hepatic artery Right gastric artery Gastroduodenal artery which give right gastroepiploic artery PHYSIOLOGY Function: 1.Digestion of food, reduce the size of food 2.Acts as reservoir 3.Absorption of Vit. 12, iron and calcium Types of Cells/


Anatomy and Physiology: The Digestive System

Anatomy and Physiology: The Digestive System to accompany Overview 1 Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract 2 Accessory Organs of the Head 3 Swallowing 4 Stomach 5 Accessory Organs of the Abdomen 6 Small Intestine 7 Large Intestine 8 Phases of Digestion 9 Food Molecules Essential Terms digestion process of mechanically or chemically breaking down food absorption passage of small molecules into blood and lymph digestive system organs/


Chapter 14 The Digestive System and Body Metabolism

Digestive System and Body Metabolism Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology Seventh Edition Elaine N. Marieb Chapter 14 The Digestive System and Body Metabolism Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Digestive System and Body Metabolism/ Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Structure of the Stomach Mucosa Gastric pits formed by folded mucosa Glands and specialized cells are in the gastric gland region Slide 14.20a Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. /


Lecture 1 Gastrointestinal Physiology

Eleventh Edition Guyton & Hall Published by Elsevier Saunders 2011 Learning Objectives Physiologic Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Wall The General Characteristics of Smooth Muscle and its Function Smooth muscle cell classifications and types of contraction Muscle layers in GI wall Electrical Activity of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Slow Waves and spike potentials Calcium Ions and Muscle Contraction Neural Control of Gastrointestinal Function-Enteric Nervous System Learning Objectives (Cont.) Differences/


ABSORPTION OF DRUGS Prof. Dr. Basavaraj K. Nanjwade M. Pharm., Ph. D

Nose, Throat, Trachea, Buccal Cavity, Lungs ,Vaginal And Rectal Surfaces PHYSIOLOGICAL FACTORS: Gastrointestinal (Gi) Physiology Influence Of Drug Pka And Gi Ph On Drug Absorbtion Git Blood Flow Gastric Emptying Disease States 08/10/2010 KLECOP, Nipani PENETRATION /P.L.Madan. Biopharmaceutics & pharmacokinetics by G.R.Chatwal. Human anatomy & physiology by Tortora. www.google.com. 08/10/2010 KLECOP, Nipani E-mail: bknanjwade@yahoo.co.in Thank you Cell No: 00919742431000 E-mail: bknanjwade@yahoo.co.in 08/10//


Gastric and duodenal ulcer disease

Gastric and duodenal ulcer disease Anatomy Arterial blood supply Lymphatic drainage Nerve supply Stimulant of Gastric secretion: PHYSIOLOGY Function: Digestion of food, reduce the size of food Acts as reservoir Absorption of Vit. 12, iron and calcium Stimulant of Gastric secretion: Gastrin -----> (+) parietal cell Acetylcholine (vagus) ---> (+) gastric cells Histamine (mast cells) ---> parietal & chief cells PHYSIOLOGY BAO: 2 – 5 meq of acid/hr. (vagal tone and basal histamine secretion) MAO: Cephalic (/


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