Download ppt on motivational stories

Introducing the Story Literary Focus: Theme and Character Reading Skills: Making Inferences About Motivation Feature Menu Cranes by Hwang Sunwŏn translated.

you read “Cranes,” think about why the main character takes the actions he does makes the decisions he makes Cranes Reading Skills: Making Inferences about Motivation [End of Section] The conflict in this story is shaped by the civil war that took place in the early 1950s in Korea, a nation west of Japan and bordering on China and Russia. At the/


Motivating Sustainable Behavior Changes with a virtual polar bear StepGreen Users Want Better Feedback, Comparisons and Competition with Peers Tawanna.

) 1. “Goal Effects on Action and Cognition,” Gollwitzer and Moskowitz (1996) 2. “Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior”, De Young (2000) 3. Nurturing “Artificial Pets: Simple Behaviors Elicit Complex Attachments”,/ might yield statistically significant results Increase number of conditions –Bear – Attachment story –Bear – Control Story –Bear – No story –No Bear – No Story Better manipulation –Customizable characters Further analysis of data –Correlations between actions,/


Extracting stories from heterogeneous information sources V.S. Subrahmanian, M. Fayzullin University of Maryland M. Albanese, C. Cesarano, A. Picariello.

information sources V.S. Subrahmanian, M. Fayzullin University of Maryland M. Albanese, C. Cesarano, A. Picariello Univ. of Napoli, Italy 10/20/2004KF Workshop2 Talk Outline  Motivating examples  Story Architecture  The Model  Conclusions 10/20/2004KF Workshop3 STORY Participants  Joint research project University of Maryland, College Park, USA  V.S. Subrahmanian  M. Fayzullin  Amelia Sagoff Università di Napoli, Federico II  Antonio Picariello  Massimiliano/


Motivating Students to Write: The Sky is the Limit Carolyn L. Cook Ph. D. Selene Rayho, Ellen Rocha, Elizabeth Smith Mount St. Mary’s University

Create your own Memory Chain Start with: The Park Start with: The Park Share your best story idea with a partner Share your best story idea with a partner Conferring points Conferring points Listen to your partner Listen to your partner /, G. & Chang-Wells, G. (1992). Constructing knowledge together: Classrooms as centers of inquiry and literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. 30 Motivating Students to Write: The Sky is the Limit Carolyn L. Cook Ph. D. Selene Rayho, Ellen Rocha, Elizabeth Smith Mount St. Mary’/


How to write an abstract Steve Wallace. The problem with motivation as a researcher Why computer games? - Tell our own story - 1) motivation - 2) clear.

ways to succeed - 4) quantified success - 5) make a difference in my online world Highly effective researchers stay motivated We need excitement and purpose in our research Writing research is telling our own story Research is interesting for the same reasons Research can “ tell our story ” - motivation ( background ) - mission (objective) - try different ways to succeed (methods) - quantified success (results) - impact (implications or discussion) We/


Elements of a Story Ms. Walsh Elements of a Story: Setting – The time and place a story takes place. Characters – the people, animals or creatures in.

do the dwarfs allow Snow White to stay with them? Character Motivation. Why does the queen disguise herself as an old peddler woman? Character Motivation. Why does the queen give Snow White the poison apple? Plot Walsh Publishing Co. 2009 Plot Plot - the events that take place in a story. Every story needs a plot! The plot has different “parts…” Exposition: the start of/


“The King of Mazy May” Jack London Survival and the Strength of Character ------------------- Literary Focus: Characterization and Character Motivation.

right thing. Post-Reading Activity Copy the organizers below into your notes. Be prepared to complete information about the main character’s traits as an individual as well as his motivation for action during the story. TraitsMotivation


The bennymay story executive summary To begin, pres the “F5” function key. Use the arrow keys to move forwards and backwards.

ch. 7).ch. 7 1. Aviation in childhood 2. Aviation in teens 3. Aviation in uni 4. As RAAF wanted 5. Motivated 6. Fighter the bennymay story 8. ADF assesses me as perfectly fit and healthy (A1G1Z1) (ref. ch. 8).ch. 8 1. Aviation in childhood 2. /Aviation in teens 3. Aviation in uni 4. As RAAF wanted 5. Motivated 6. Fighter 7. Thinker the bennymay story In sum: everything was leading toward a great aviation career. 1. Aviation in childhood 2. Aviation in teens 3. Aviation /


Motivating the Self to Virtue in Western and non-Western Countries: Does nation or faith matter more in the development of the moral self? IMF Presentation.

– First interview (1) React to Classic stories of Christian, Muslim, and Buddhist wise motivation to virtue. (2) wise motivation to virtue in a personal acquaintance – (1) immediate motivation (e.g. resisting temptation), and – (2) lifespan motivation to personal development, through, e.g., daily/Discuss their simulation performance (2) Follow up on themes from 1 st interview. Buddhist Example of a Motivation to Virtue Story (Samyutta Nikaya Vol. 1, ch.3:25 (5) ) King Pasenadi of Kosala approached the /


7 STEPS to Story Telling.  First, your story needs a character. Who is this story about?  Your character doesnt have to be human. It can be an animal.

on anymore 4.needs medicine to cure an illness 5.wants to protect his magic spell book Motivation con’t Your story needs a setting.  Where and when does this story take place?  Details are important. Be descriptive!  Use: Step 4: Setting  If/). Setting: Example  The characters, the setting, and the problem, and the motivation to solve that problem are usually told in the first section of your story.  The rest of your story is detailing the obstacles - the things that get in your characters way.  /


Digital Stories of Deep Learning Dr. Helen Barrett International Society for Technology in Education and University of Alaska Anchorage.

Future Linked to… Digital Storytelling Blogs & Wikis Games Some concerns…  Assessment for Learning  Portfolios for Learning  What about Motivation? Components of Portfolio Development  Content  Purpose  Process Components of Portfolio Development  Content: evidence (artifacts + reflections) Components / best suited to transformation in new situations of action.” Storytelling as Reflection (Schön, 1988) “Stories are products of reflection, but we do not usually hold onto them long enough to make them /


Improving Communication Skills: Adding Narrative Therapy to Motivational Interviewing to Reach the Residency Milestones Lauren Oshman MD MPH Gene Combs.

patient’s perspectives. Confrontation – correcting patient’s impaired perspective, imposing reality. Evocation – bring out the client’s own intrinsic motivation for change Education – fills deficits in patient’s knowledge, insight, and skills. Acceptance – show empathy and seek to /to MI? Narrative empathy, putting yourself in their viewpoint as a character in a novel Externalization: developing a story of working together to manage the problem and the problems it is causing in the person’s life Placing/


Teaching reading at Queensmill School

and improve their attention and concentration skills. The SALT team present their activities through highly reinforcing tasks to motivate the pupils and help them to focus and attend. The combined class and SALT teams help support /the pictures to answer simple closed questions. Activities to demonstrate comprehension include sequencing activities (pictures/text from the story or activity completed) or matching words/symbols to pictures. Daily schedules showing progression of reading difficulty from photos/


Plots and Emplotment.

fighting themselves (internal demons) Dexter Humans against the supernatural Supernatural And so on Motive Conflict is based on the motive of the protagonist Seeking something Often generated through actions of the antagonist or by changes in circumstance/ to the traditional plot for a given genre leads to audience disinterest Some amount of creativity is appreciated Detective story Client comes to detective, asks for help Detective takes case, is opposed by antagonist/criminal Detective investigates, meets/


Stories and statistics: What can the Sally Clark case tell us about the psychology of evidential reasoning? David Lagnado Division of Psychology and Language.

of evidence to reach singular conclusion (e.g. guilt of suspect) Story model (Pennington & Hastie, 1986, 1991, 1992)  Evidence evaluated through story construction –‘Stories involve human action sequences in which relationships of physical causality and intentional causality/ alone with Harry Stephen report Reliability Opportunity is often a pre-condition of guilt Legal idioms  Motive idiom Motive is typically a pre-condition of guilt Sally murders baby Sally career driven Sally resentful Letters to /


Vocabulary 8.

today. Draw a picture to remind yourself of meaning. Conflict What is a conflict you had recently and what type is it? Draw a picture to remind yourself of meaning. Story Elements-Key Character Motive Dialogue Person or animal in a story Name a major character and a minor character from a book. Draw a picture to remind yourself of meaning/


Analyzing Narratives Review Session. Authors use dialogue in narratives in order to: (Choose the best answer) a. make the story more complex b. reveal.

the following poem with the purpose of looking for the motive of the author. What can we infer is the motive of the author? How does that relate to a possible theme? Jimmy Jet and His TV Set Ill tell you the story of Jimmy Jet, And you know what I tell you/the following poem with the purpose of looking for the motive of the author. What can we infer is the motive of the author? How does that relate to a possible theme? Jimmy Jet and His TV Set Ill tell you the story of Jimmy Jet, And you know what I tell you/


Vocabulary 6. Story Elements Motive If someone tells a lie to another person, what could their motive be? Draw a picture to remind yourself of meaning.

character from a book. Draw a picture to remind yourself of meaning. Story Elements-Key Motive Reason behind individual’s actions If someone tells a lie to another person, what could their motive be? Draw a picture to remind yourself of meaning. Dialogue Conversation /.Setting-time and place 2.Character-person/animal in a story 3.Plot-events that make up story 4.Conflict-problem 5.Imagery-language that appeals to 5 senses. 6.Motive-reason behind actions 7.Dialogue-conversation 8.Flashback-thinking back /


Introduction to your Paper Here is the Big Picture:Here is the Big Picture: You have a short story to read, download, analyze and write about: George Orwell’s.

give you critical background and the motivations of the European powers as they conquered large parts of the world. I expect you to be able to use this information when you write about the short story.I expect you to be able/previously had numerous religions such as Animism or indigenous beliefs.Africa previously had numerous religions such as Animism or indigenous beliefs. Motive 5: Division within Africa Many languages, cultures, and tribes made it difficult for Africans to organize a united front against /


Narration and the Fiction Film Three approaches to the problem of narrative as representation: considering the story’s world or diegesis; its portrayal.

degree of stylistic self-consciousness. Classical narrationArt cinema narration Single protagonistSingle and multiple protagonists Driven by desireGoal bereft Built on conflictBoundary situation stories Linear chain of cause and effectEpisodic and elliptical Clear and complete motivationAmbiguous or unclear motivation Omniscient narrationRestricted narration Strong sense of closureOpen endings Expressive verisimilitude in art cinema A subjective or expressive verisimilitude attuned to “exhibiting character/


Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life

Learning Emotional Intelligence Belief in Self CASE STUDY IN CRITICAL THINKING: POPSON’S DILEMMA Do you think it is a professor’s responsibility to motivate students? Why or Why not? From which of the professors in this story would you most want to take a course? Why? From which professor would you least want to take a course? Why? DIVING DEEPER: Is/


Imagineering Inauthentic Legitimate Peripheral Participation: An Instructional Design Approach for Motivating Computing Education Mark Guzdial and Allison.

Imagineering Inauthentic Legitimate Peripheral Participation: An Instructional Design Approach for Motivating Computing Education Mark Guzdial and Allison Elliott Tew College of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Story  Legitimate peripheral participation as a theory of learning in a social context.  Viewing instruction from an LPP lens. Alignment and Authenticity Alignment and Authenticity  Viewing formal CS education (instruction) from /


Introducing the Stories Literary Skills Focus: Situations and Motivations Reading Skills Focus: Comparing and Contrasting Situations and Motivations Writing.

compare, you look for similarities. Mrs. Flowers by Maya Angelou A Shot at It by Esmeralda Santiago Reading Skills Focus: Comparing and Contrasting Motivations As you read these two autobiographical stories, compare and contrast the main characters’ situations and motivations. Compare Contrast Both Marguerite and Esmeralda have trouble speaking. Marguerite lives in a small southern town, while Esmeralda lives in a large northern/


Elements of Fiction. Plot Plot is the events that tell the story. Every plot is a series of events that are related to one another.

plot is developed through the internal and external responses of the characters:  Intellectual motivation  Emotional motivation  Physical motivation  Status seeking Character Motivations The plot is further developed through unique human qualities  Courage/fear  Ambition/laziness  Honesty/dishonesty Setting The setting means where and when a story takes place It includes the time the story takes place  present (now)  past (before now)  future The setting includes important/


“The King of Mazy May” Jack London Survival and the Strength of Character ------------------- Literary Focus: Characterization and Character Motivation.

right thing. Post-Reading Activity Copy the organizers below into your notes. Be prepared to complete information about the main character’s traits as an individual as well as his motivation for action during the story. TraitsMotivation


Genre – Bibliography A true story about the life of a real person Information about why the person is important Opinions and judgments based on facts.

does. A character’s traits can provide clues about the character’s motives. The setting of a story can affect the character’s actions. Read “Tip” Story elements can affect a character’s motives. kindhonestselfish ActionTrait A boy finds ten dollars in the hallway and / 77 Use graphic organizer to help plan. Who? Jackie Mitchell What?Where?When?Why?How? Characters in a story act as they do for a reason. Motive - A character’s reason for acting a certain way. A character’s traits are what the character is /


What is Fiction?  Definition of Fiction: –Fiction is a made up story that may seem real, but has never happened in real life.

who the story is mostly about. These character can be a five headed alien or a 14 year old girl who is looking to find a place in the world. You can create whomever you wish to be your character! Motivation   A character’s motivation is what /does not directly think or observe. Point of View  Limited: –Tells us what only ONE character sees, feels, and thinks. –Tells the story from the point of view of ONE character. –The narrator does not tell us what other characters think or feel. Review:  What is the/


attributed copies permitted 1 Generic Agile Collaborative Development (ACD) Process for Working Group Project Management Motivated.

time rick.dove@parshift.com, attributed copies permitted 3 Responsive to Change Effective Distributed Collaboration Self- Motivated Participation Recognize and Celebrate Progress Support with Collaboration Tools Pairing and Swarming Manage with Disciplined Process Rapid /simultaneously rather than deferring intent – with the idea that intent could be changed. With out clear accessible user stories, projects 4 and 5 exhibited focus churn. rick.dove@parshift.com, attributed copies permitted 27 Pete & /


Title: Designing a narrative-based educational game to model learners’ motivational characteristics Authors: Jutima Methaneethorn Dr. Paul Brna Organisation:

her perception of the target) Causal model showing the relationship between a learner’s motivation, empathy and ILE features TraitsILE features States A framework for story creation Define type of game in which the model will be applied –Role-/ (NPC) Table 1: The ILE features and their represented elements in the story Table 2: The represented elements of the ILE features and the relevant motivational characteristics Relevant Traits Represented elements Relevant States State IState IIState IIIState IV -Alex /


ELEMENTS OF A SHORT STORY. Setting Character Plot Conflict Point of view Theme.

terms for an old distinction by discriminating between flat and round characters. A round character is complex in temperament and motivation and is represented with subtle particularity; such a character therefore is as difficult to describe with any adequacy as a/evaluates the actions and motives of the characters, and sometimes expresses personal views about human life. Limited Omniscient – The story is told by a third person narrator but from the viewpoint of a character in the story, usually the main /


Models of Work Motivation Part 2 Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Ph.D. Middle Tennessee State University.

for Power, n Pow Need for Affiliation, n Aff TAT McClelland, D. C. & Steele, R. S. (1972). Motivation Workshops: A student workbook for experiential learning in human motivation. New York: General Learning Press. Harvard University Taking TAT Please look at the picture for about 20 seconds. Make up imaginative stories about this picture. Work Rapidly. Don’t spend over 5 minutes on this/


How to write an abstract Steve Wallace. The problem with motivation as a researcher Why computer games? Why computer games? - Tell our own story - 1)

different ways to succeed (methods) - try different ways to succeed (methods) - quantified success (results) - quantified success (results) - impact (implications or discussion) - impact (implications or discussion) We must find motivation in our research Stories vs. Research Both must be interesting or they won ’ t be retold or cited Both must be interesting or they won ’ t be retold or cited Interesting = help solve/


Chapter 12: Motivation & Emotion Motivation: set of factors that activate, direct & maintain behavior, usually toward some goal ….Motivation is energizes.

skills, or ideas, for control, and for rapidly attaining high standard. Achievement Motivation: TAT w Write down what is happening in this picture. w Write a story including details. w Please share with a partner. Thematic Apperception Test (TAT): w/person in the picture looks really angry and upset about something. Reflecting on your story can you see your own feelings or your own motivations. People’s fantasies/stories reflect their concern for achievement nAch w Need for achievement (nAch): a social /


Literary Analysis Character. Definitions to know: Literary analysis Character Main character Minor character Character traits Character motives Characterization.

why a character acts, thinks, or feels a certain way is called motivation. Example: hunger might be a motive for stealing food or stealing money to buy food. Character motivation and reaction move the plot along Characterization Characterization is how writers help you get to know the characters in a story. There are four main methods writers use to help us get to know/


Plot: A series of related events  Exposition: sets the stage for the book— introduces setting and characters  Conflict: the problem in the story  Can.

in his own version of the world” -- John Rogers Archetype: a type of character who repeatedly appears in stories Archetype: a type of character who repeatedly appears in stories –Examples: the hero, the martyr, the villain in black, the bully, the star-crossed lovers Character Motivation What drives a character to act (or react) What drives a character to act (or react) Understanding/


The 36th Forum for Behavioral Science in Family Medicine Sponsored by The Medical College of Wisconsin Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Narrative.

Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change, 3 rd ed. New York: Guilford Publ, 2012. Print. The 36th Forum for Behavioral Science in Family Medicine Sponsored by The Medical College of Wisconsin Spirit of MI Collaboration Compassion Evocation Acceptance MI Spirit “I bring physician expertise. You are an “expert” in your story/ of Preferred Realities. First edition. Norton. 1996. Miller, W. & Rollnick, S. Motivational Interviewing. Third Edition. Guilford Press. 2012. Olson, M. & Triana, C. Development /


Characters, Characterization, and Motivation

the author describes the acts, words, thoughts, feelings, or appearance of a character, or describes how other characters in the story react to him or her — leaving the reader to judge for himself or herself what kind of personality or personality traits/ emotional outburst, or a temporary feeling or action. What is a motive? What is motivation? Whether one uses motive or motivation, the idea is the same: a character’s motive or motivation is nothing more than why a character does whatever he or she does/


Kate Chopin Webquest.

find out more about Kate Chopin (follow the links – you may have to cut and paste.)  Once you know Kate Chopin better, you will begin to understand what motivates Louise Mallard, the protagonist in "Story of an Hour" (where is she "coming from"?). Process (cont.) 2.  FINDING THE ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS:  Don’t expect to find the answers to the questions/


Engaging All Children in the Reading Process: Strategies that Motivate Wednesday, May 7, 2008, 2:00 to 4:45 pm Dr. Kathryn Bauserman Dr. Kathryn Edmunds.

and Comprehension By John Guthrie, Reading Today, April/May 2008, p. 38 Intrinsic Motivation Perceived Autonomy Self-efficacy Collaboration Mastery Goal Pursuit Intrinsic Motivation Activities Progressive Storytelling Storytelling videotape: Dr. Marilyn Izzard Story Impressions www.allamericareads.org/lessonplans (see next slide) Story Impression Leola => Pine Hollow Woods => Honeybears => Mr. Weasel => Inn => Tasty treats => Chair => Bed => Stranger => Miss Blackbird => home Perceived Autonomy Activities/


What Do You Need to Know About Characters?

Protagonist and Antagonist Subordinate Characters Characters and Conflict Character Motivation Characterization Direct Characterization Indirect Characterization Your Turn Characters Characters are the people we meet in a story, poem, or play. We learn about them through/often reveals a lot about them. Observe characters’ actions to determine what their personalities are like, what motivates them, and how they deal with conflict. Characterization Indirect Characterization Quick Check How does the author show/


SARAH BLUST, LMSW, MPH PROJECT MANAGER PRIMARY CARE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (PCDC) Motivational Interviewing: A Practical Approach.

Program Managers, Office Managers Did I miss anyone? Thank you! Mute button back on please Motivational Interviewing is an approach all of you can use… Story of MI MI Spirit Substance Treatment: Then & Now 200 Clinical Trials Later PCMH MI /Apply to Practice The spirit of MI Guiding Principles: RULE Diabetes Cancer Screening OARS Recognizing change talk Story of MI The Story of Motivational Interviewing Originally came about as a different approach to substance/alcohol treatment 1970’s - treatment approach /


1 Fundraising & Development Nonprofits Building Success Stories 2010-11 Fundamental Five+ Non-Profit Capacity Training Series presents Lorraine Tamaribuchi,

a well-crafted message that says "do it now!") 2. Focus on ability (make it easier) 3. Increase motivation (through stories and rewards) Sensation – pleasure / pain Anticipation – hope / fear Belonging – social acceptance / social rejection Youll need /- a well-crafted message that says "do it now!") 2. Focus on ability (make it easier) 3. Increase motivation (through stories and rewards) Sensation – pleasure / pain Anticipation – hope / fear Belonging – social acceptance / social rejection Heres this slide/


THE TEST - ANGELICA GIBB

in a racist phrase: “Old enough to have quite a flock of pickaninnies, eh?” More Rhetorical Questions The Inspector questions Marian’s motive in wanting a licence. “Sure you don’t really want to sneak out nights to meet some young blood?” This suggests Marian/STYLE: QU 8: Look for words, phrases, or images which are included by the author to add to the meaning of the story and to increase your understanding of the characters or the themes. ATTITUDE: All authors have an ATTITUDE to their subject matter to /


Character Character: A person, animal, or other such object represented in a story.

character. Example: Edmund and Lucy Flat Character A flat character is a one- dimensional character, typically not central to the story. Example: The Professor, Seamus Finnigan The protagonist is usually… The central character A character the reader can identify with / to feel good about myself I want to be a better person I want to fulfill personal satisfaction Character Motivation Extrinsic: Motivated by external factors. Example: I want some chocolate I want to earn money I want good presents from Santa/


Motivation and Leadership

use negative reinforcement by reprimanding their employees or not giving them raises. Employees who receive this kind of reinforcement may be motivated not to engage in the behavior again. Storytellers Leaders often use different tactics to motivate others. The use of stories to communicate ideas is one of them. A parable or symbolism can help bring a difficult situation into a clearer picture/


…. Stories From The Old Testament That Build Faith & Devotion.

Killer” 1 Sam 17  David’s involvement vv. 31-51a  David battles Goliath vv. 41-51a  David gives 2 motivating reasons…  David’s motivation was not the “lucrative reward” offered by Saul v. 25 Stories From The O.T. That Build Faith & Devotion The Story Of A “Giant Killer” 1 Sam 17  David’s involvement vv. 31-51a  David battles Goliath vv. 41-51a/


Elements of a Story Setting Details can describe: Time of day Time of year Time in History Scenery Weather Location The setting describes where an when.

does the queen’s heart turn against Snow White? Character Motivation. Why do the dwarfs allow Snow White to stay with them? Character Motivation. Why does the queen disguise herself as an old peddler woman? Character Motivation. Why does the queen give Snow White the poison apple? Exposition: the start of the story, before the action starts Rising Action: the series of events and/


How to Sell Your Story to Broader Audience Durhane Wong-Rieger, PhD Consumer Advocare Network.

presented, then arguments presented against undesirable side) –Presenters perceived as more credible June 2007 Selling Your Story Motivational appeals Logical or emotional mainly in eyes of receiver (prior beliefs, mood) Compliance increases with reason /“stigma” was perceived as “uncontrollable” (disability) more effective than controllable (obesity) June 2007 Selling Your Story Motivational Appeals Humorous: not change behaviour but can be useful adjunct –Capture attention with humor or joke –Distraction:/


The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF)

operations Tighter IT budgets Global competition More frantic skills chase Increase in litigation Failure can be terminal TOGAF - The Continuing Story of 49 TA P12 Version 1.0 01/03 What is our current motivation? TOGAF - The Continuing Story What is our current motivation? Pace set by public agencies and large vendors More enforcement of acquisition regulations Clinger-Cohen Act (US Information Technology Management/


Gholipour A. 2006. Organizational Behavior. University of Tehran. Organizational Behavior: Motivation Essence of Life.

Performance Goal Difficulty Gholipour A. 2006. Organizational Behavior. University of Tehran. Approaches to Job Design 2. Motivational Approaches 2. Motivational Approaches these techniques (job enlargement, job rotation, job enrichment, and job characteristics) attempt to improve / Job 2 Operate Sound Job 3 Report Story Job 1 Operate Camera Operate Sound Report Story Job 2 Operate Camera Operate Sound Report Story Job 3 Operate Camera Operate Sound Report Story Job Rotation vs. Job Enlargement Gholipour A/


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