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Chapter 9* Managing Meetings. Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © 2001 10-2 1.Explain why meetings, committees, and being able to lead meetings.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 9* Managing Meetings. Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © 2001 10-2 1.Explain why meetings, committees, and being able to lead meetings."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 9* Managing Meetings

2 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © Explain why meetings, committees, and being able to lead meetings are important components of supervision even in an age of electronic communications. 2. Identify the major types of meetings, their purposes and benefits, and their limitations. 3.Discuss the major types of committees and suggest guidelines for determining the composition and size of a committee. 4.Identify the major factors contributing to effective meetings, especially the chairperson’s leadership role. 5.Describe how supervisors can better manage meetings with their own managers. 1.Explain why meetings, committees, and being able to lead meetings are important components of supervision even in an age of electronic communications. 2. Identify the major types of meetings, their purposes and benefits, and their limitations. 3.Discuss the major types of committees and suggest guidelines for determining the composition and size of a committee. 4.Identify the major factors contributing to effective meetings, especially the chairperson’s leadership role. 5.Describe how supervisors can better manage meetings with their own managers. After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

3 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © MEETINGS, COMMITTEES, AND LEADING MEETINGS Electronic meeting —A group meeting via electronic transmission in which participants are not physically together in one location. One of the most advanced forms of electronic meetings uses a computer system know as group decision support software (GDSS) which enables individuals to discuss and decide issues without actually getting together in one location. Electronic meeting —A group meeting via electronic transmission in which participants are not physically together in one location. One of the most advanced forms of electronic meetings uses a computer system know as group decision support software (GDSS) which enables individuals to discuss and decide issues without actually getting together in one location. 1

4 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © MEETINGS, COMMITTEES, AND LEADING MEETINGS Complex organizational structures, job specialization, work teams, and other factors require that all organi- zational efforts be coordinated properly. Meetings are often the most effective way to achieve organizational objectives, particularly at the depart- mental level. Communication and decision-making concepts and principles are important components in the supervisor’s approach to meetings. Complex organizational structures, job specialization, work teams, and other factors require that all organi- zational efforts be coordinated properly. Meetings are often the most effective way to achieve organizational objectives, particularly at the depart- mental level. Communication and decision-making concepts and principles are important components in the supervisor’s approach to meetings. Supervisors and Meetings 1

5 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © MEETINGS, COMMITTEES, AND LEADING MEETINGS Informational meeting —people gathered together to hear the group leader present information. Discussional meeting —people gathered together to participate in a discussion with the group leader by offering their opinions, suggestions, or recommendations. Decisional meeting —people are gathered together to make decisions on a particular problem or task for which the group has been granted some decision- making authority. Informational meeting —people gathered together to hear the group leader present information. Discussional meeting —people gathered together to participate in a discussion with the group leader by offering their opinions, suggestions, or recommendations. Decisional meeting —people are gathered together to make decisions on a particular problem or task for which the group has been granted some decision- making authority. Types of meetings: 2

6 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © BENEFITS FROM MEETINGS Individuals in a group can exchange information, opinions, and experiences. Group deliberation can promote cooperation. Employees can demonstrate creativity and problem-solving ability to others. Individuals in a group can exchange information, opinions, and experiences. Group deliberation can promote cooperation. Employees can demonstrate creativity and problem-solving ability to others. 2

7 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © LIMITATIONS OF MEETINGS Meetings can be held too often or are some- times too time consuming. Meetings may foster the concept of divided responsibility. Groupthink happens when the group’s desire for consensus becomes greater than its desire to reach the best possible decision. Meetings can be held too often or are some- times too time consuming. Meetings may foster the concept of divided responsibility. Groupthink happens when the group’s desire for consensus becomes greater than its desire to reach the best possible decision. 2

8 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © MAJOR TYPES OF COMMITTEES Committee —Group drawn together to solve a problem or complete a task. Also called a commission, team, task force, or board. Permanent (standing) committee —Group that meets on a more or less permanent basis to deal with recurring issues or problems. Temporary (ad hoc) committee —Group that meets only for a limited time and for a specific purpose. Committee —Group drawn together to solve a problem or complete a task. Also called a commission, team, task force, or board. Permanent (standing) committee —Group that meets on a more or less permanent basis to deal with recurring issues or problems. Temporary (ad hoc) committee —Group that meets only for a limited time and for a specific purpose. 3

9 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © MEMBERSHIP AND SIZE OF A COMMITTEE To be effective, a committee should bring together representatives from each group affected by its decisions. Large committees may be more effective if they are divided into subcommittees. To be effective, a committee should bring together representatives from each group affected by its decisions. Large committees may be more effective if they are divided into subcommittees. 3

10 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO EFFECTIVE MEETINGS Meetings should be called only when necessary. If a matter can be handled by other means, such as by telephone or discussion, a meeting should not be required. Most meetings at the supervisory level are of a problem-solving nature. Meetings should be called only when necessary. If a matter can be handled by other means, such as by telephone or discussion, a meeting should not be required. Most meetings at the supervisory level are of a problem-solving nature. 4

11 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO EFFECTIVE MEETINGS The goals of a problem-solving meeting should be to: come up with the best feasible solution come up with the best feasible solution do so with unanimity or a majority consensus do so with unanimity or a majority consensus accomplish this in a short period of time accomplish this in a short period of time come up with the best feasible solution come up with the best feasible solution do so with unanimity or a majority consensus do so with unanimity or a majority consensus accomplish this in a short period of time accomplish this in a short period of time 4

12 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO EFFECTIVE MEETINGS Chairperson — Group leader who is responsible for guiding a meeting toward completion of its stated objectives. A chairperson should: be able to fuse individual viewpoints and personalities into an effective team. be able to fuse individual viewpoints and personalities into an effective team. develop ground rules for conducting meetings and keeping them focused. develop ground rules for conducting meetings and keeping them focused. Chairperson — Group leader who is responsible for guiding a meeting toward completion of its stated objectives. A chairperson should: be able to fuse individual viewpoints and personalities into an effective team. be able to fuse individual viewpoints and personalities into an effective team. develop ground rules for conducting meetings and keeping them focused. develop ground rules for conducting meetings and keeping them focused. 4

13 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO EFFECTIVE MEETINGS 4 Ground Rules for Meetings Everyone will be candid and specific. Everyone will be candid and specific. Everyone will have a say. Everyone will have a say. Everyone will stop what they are doing and listen carefully to the other team member’s comments. Everyone will stop what they are doing and listen carefully to the other team member’s comments. Every team member must support his or her opinion with facts. Every team member must support his or her opinion with facts. No one will interrupt another—we will hear each other out. No one will interrupt another—we will hear each other out. We are a TEAM and working together everyone will achieve more. We are a TEAM and working together everyone will achieve more. Ground Rules for Meetings Everyone will be candid and specific. Everyone will be candid and specific. Everyone will have a say. Everyone will have a say. Everyone will stop what they are doing and listen carefully to the other team member’s comments. Everyone will stop what they are doing and listen carefully to the other team member’s comments. Every team member must support his or her opinion with facts. Every team member must support his or her opinion with facts. No one will interrupt another—we will hear each other out. No one will interrupt another—we will hear each other out. We are a TEAM and working together everyone will achieve more. We are a TEAM and working together everyone will achieve more.

14 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS The chairperson should not allow meetings to drag on too long or keep it so short that desirable solutions do not get careful consideration. The chairperson should also allow all members to participate fully and voice suggestions and opinions. 4

15 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS 4 WHAT is the purpose (goal) of the meeting? WHAT are the opportunities, threats, conflicts, problems, concerns, issues or topics to be considered? WHAT information needs to be disseminated prior to the meeting? WHAT information needs to be gathered prior to the meeting? WHAT advanced preparation is needed? WHAT work must be completed prior to the meeting? WHAT additional resources will be needed? WHAT are the ground rules for conducting the meeting? WHAT is the purpose (goal) of the meeting? WHAT are the opportunities, threats, conflicts, problems, concerns, issues or topics to be considered? WHAT information needs to be disseminated prior to the meeting? WHAT information needs to be gathered prior to the meeting? WHAT advanced preparation is needed? WHAT work must be completed prior to the meeting? WHAT additional resources will be needed? WHAT are the ground rules for conducting the meeting? Questions to Consider When Planning a Meeting

16 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS 4 WHO are the people involved with the concerns, issues, or topics? WHO needs to do advance work or make decisions regarding the agenda? WHO should be invited because they can provide information needed for problem solving or discussion on the issue? WHO will develop and distribute the agenda? WHO are the people that need to attend? WHO will facilitate the meeting? WHO will be assigned as the scribe? WHO are the people involved with the concerns, issues, or topics? WHO needs to do advance work or make decisions regarding the agenda? WHO should be invited because they can provide information needed for problem solving or discussion on the issue? WHO will develop and distribute the agenda? WHO are the people that need to attend? WHO will facilitate the meeting? WHO will be assigned as the scribe? Questions to Consider When Planning a Meeting

17 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS 4 HOW much time do we need to allot to each topic? HOW should the meeting room be arranged? HOW do we strive to find consensus and areas of agreement? HOW do we stay focused on the subject(s)? HOW much time do we need to allot to each topic? HOW should the meeting room be arranged? HOW do we strive to find consensus and areas of agreement? HOW do we stay focused on the subject(s)? Questions to Consider When Planning a Meeting

18 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS 4 WHEN and WHERE should the meeting be scheduled? WHEN should the meeting end? WHEN and HOW should the meeting be evaluated? WHEN and WHAT follow-up is needed to the meeting (i.e., distribute a summary of the meeting and the actions to be taken)? WHEN and WHERE should the meeting be scheduled? WHEN should the meeting end? WHEN and HOW should the meeting be evaluated? WHEN and WHAT follow-up is needed to the meeting (i.e., distribute a summary of the meeting and the actions to be taken)? Questions to Consider When Planning a Meeting

19 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS Create an agenda, which lists the topics to be discussed in sequence, and provides a time limit for each. An agenda should be followed, but also should be flexible to allow for more discussion if necessary. The chairperson will have to strike the right balance between forward-moving formality and active participation informality. Create an agenda, which lists the topics to be discussed in sequence, and provides a time limit for each. An agenda should be followed, but also should be flexible to allow for more discussion if necessary. The chairperson will have to strike the right balance between forward-moving formality and active participation informality. 4

20 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS The chairperson should encourage full participation, so that everyone can bring out important information without feeling judged. A meeting leader/facilitator should ask Are all participants involved in the discussion? Are all participants listening to the discussion? Are comments being heard and paraphrased? Is everyone bringing issues and concerns to the table? Are sensitive and/or critical issues being explored? The chairperson should encourage full participation, so that everyone can bring out important information without feeling judged. A meeting leader/facilitator should ask Are all participants involved in the discussion? Are all participants listening to the discussion? Are comments being heard and paraphrased? Is everyone bringing issues and concerns to the table? Are sensitive and/or critical issues being explored? 4

21 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © THE ROLE OF THE CHAIRPERSON IN CONDUCTING MEETINGS State personal opinions Guide the group to a decision Take a vote Follow-up State personal opinions Guide the group to a decision Take a vote Follow-up 4

22 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © HOW TO MANAGE MEETINGS WITH THE BOSS Supervisors also have to: communicate information upward communicate information upward manage relationships with their immediate supervisors in a positive manner manage relationships with their immediate supervisors in a positive manner be prepared to contribute suggestions, ideas, and opinions be prepared to contribute suggestions, ideas, and opinions Supervisors also have to: communicate information upward communicate information upward manage relationships with their immediate supervisors in a positive manner manage relationships with their immediate supervisors in a positive manner be prepared to contribute suggestions, ideas, and opinions be prepared to contribute suggestions, ideas, and opinions 5

23 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © HOW TO MANAGE MEETINGS WITH THE BOSS Supervisors might better manage meetings with their bosses by considering the following: 1.Respect the boss’s time. 2.Check your motives. 3.Plan your agenda. 4.Don’t go to the boss “naked.” 5. Commit to the truth. Supervisors might better manage meetings with their bosses by considering the following: 1.Respect the boss’s time. 2.Check your motives. 3.Plan your agenda. 4.Don’t go to the boss “naked.” 5. Commit to the truth. 5

24 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © Supervisors might better manage meetings with their bosses by considering the following: 6. Advertise success. 7. Learn to say no. 8. Don’t filter information from the boss. 9. Anticipate problems. 10. Don’t be a whiner. Supervisors might better manage meetings with their bosses by considering the following: 6. Advertise success. 7. Learn to say no. 8. Don’t filter information from the boss. 9. Anticipate problems. 10. Don’t be a whiner. HOW TO MANAGE MEETINGS WITH THE BOSS 5

25 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © Supervisors might better manage meetings with their bosses by considering the following: 11. Don’t put the boss on the defensive. 12. Make a resolution. Supervisors might better manage meetings with their bosses by considering the following: 11. Don’t put the boss on the defensive. 12. Make a resolution. HOW TO MANAGE MEETINGS WITH THE BOSS 5

26 Chapter 10/Managing Meetings Hilgert & Leonard © END


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