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Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 61 Civics.

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Presentation on theme: "Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 61 Civics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 61 Civics

2 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics2 Motivation What do you think your responsibilities as U.S. citizens are and what your government’s responsibilities to its citizens are? This lesson deals with these questions.

3 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics3 Lesson overview What is civics? Why is government needed? What are the functions of government? What are the levels of government? What are the types of governments?

4 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics4 Lesson overview (cont’d) What are the principles of American democracy? Who are America's citizens? Who are the aliens in America? What are a citizen's legal duties?

5 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics5 Lesson overview (cont’d) What are a citizen's civic responsibilities? Why do citizens need to be involved? Where can volunteers donate their time? What are the benefits of volunteering?

6 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics6 Quick Write Write down what you know about our democratic government. Consider how living in a democracy affects your life.

7 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics7 What is civics? Civics—the study of the rights and duties of citizens Citizens—owe loyalty to their government and receive its protection Citizens follow a set of rules and accept the government's authority.

8 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics8 Why is government needed? Government—the ruling authority for a community Government helps people live together peacefully and productively.

9 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics9 What are the functions of government? Keeping order Providing security Providing public services Guiding the community by developing public policy

10 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics10 What are the functions of government? (cont’d)

11 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics11 What are the levels of government? National government in Washington, D.C. State governments in each of the 50 states Local governments for counties, cities, and towns No lower level can go against the laws and authority of the national government.

12 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics12 What are the types of governments? Dictatorship—control by one person or a small group of people (Cuba) Democracy—rule by the people (United States) Direct democracy—all the citizens vote firsthand (ancient Athens)

13 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics13 What are the types of governments? (cont’d) Representative democracy—citizens choose a smaller group to govern but are the source of the government's authority (United States) U.S. citizens elect presidents and members of Congress but express their opinions by contacting their representatives.

14 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics14 What are the principles of American democracy? The power of government comes from the citizens. Americans run the government through elected representatives. The government’s purpose is to improve life in the United States. Elections are free, fair, and competitive.

15 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics15 What are the principles of American democracy? (cont’d) Competing political parties are an important part of democracies. Individuals are free to develop their own capacities. Majority rule—abiding by what most people want while respecting minority rights

16 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics16 What are the principles of American democracy? (cont’d)

17 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics17 Who are America's citizens? Citizens are those born in the United States or to parents who are citizens. Foreigners become citizens through naturalization. Aliens come to the U.S. for a short time and return home without becoming citizens. Immigrants move permanently to a new country and can apply for citizenship.

18 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics18 Who are America's citizens? (cont’d)

19 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics19 Who are America's citizens? (cont’d) Only the federal government can grant citizenship and take it away. State governments can deny some privileges of citizenship, such as voting, but cannot deny citizenship itself. In most cases, the only way to lose U.S. citizenship is to voluntarily give it up. Once given up, it cannot be gotten back.

20 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics20 Who are the aliens in America? About 675,000 immigrants enter the United States each year. Priority is given to people with Particular skills Particular talents Money to invest in the U.S. economy Relatives who are US citizens

21 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics21 Who are the aliens in America? (cont’d) The 5 to 6 million illegal aliens in the United States come for work and a better life but often have a difficult time. Low-paying jobs Fear of being deported

22 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics22 Who are the aliens in America? (cont’d) Aliens can lead lives much like U.S. citizens. They can hold jobs and own property. But they may not Vote in elections Run for office Serve on juries Work in most government jobs They must carry identification cards at all times.

23 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics23 What are a citizen's legal duties? Obeying laws Paying taxes Defending the nation Serving in court Attending school

24 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics24 What are a citizen's civic responsibilities? Being informed about what the government is doing Voting in elections Respecting the rights of other people Respecting public property and the property of others

25 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics25 What are a citizen's civic responsibilities? (cont’d) Respecting the practices and traditions of others Contributing to the common good

26 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics26 Why do citizens need to be involved? Volunteers make communities better places to live. The value of time volunteered by Americans has been increasing since In 1998, it was about $225 billion.

27 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics27 Why do citizens need to be involved? (cont’d)

28 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics28 Why do citizens need to be involved? (cont’d)

29 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics29 Why do citizens need to be involved? (cont’d) Governments Have limited resources Are bureaucracies Cannot always respond quickly or efficiently to social problems

30 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics30 Why do citizens need to be involved? (cont’d) People and businesses Have time and money to donate Small businesses may Sponsor a sports team Donate prizes for a fund-raiser Large companies often Contribute to community projects Offer college scholarships

31 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics31 Where can volunteers donate their time? Some people want a personal connection to a cause and may work within their own community. Others volunteer through more formal channels, such as charitable organizations.

32 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics32 Where can volunteers donate their time? (cont’d) Places to volunteer include Homeless shelters Special Olympics Senior citizen centers Environmental organizations

33 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics33 Where can volunteers donate their time? (cont’d) Volunteer activities include Preparing and distributing meals Tutoring a child or new immigrant Cleaning up trails Helping at a campaign office Holding elective office

34 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics34 Where can volunteers donate their time? (cont’d) National service programs include The Peace Corps AmeriCorps The Senior Corps USA Freedom Corps

35 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics35 What are the benefits of volunteering? Improvements to communities New opportunities to learn, make friends, and improve skills Satisfaction from knowing that a difference has been made in someone’s life

36 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics36 What are the benefits of volunteering? (cont’d) Learning something new about an organization or about life itself Beats boredom Deal with one’s own problems better Explore various careers

37 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics37 Lesson review Civics is the study of the rights and duties of citizens. Government is needed to make and enforce laws on behalf of the people. Government’s functions include keeping order and providing security, providing public services, and developing public policy.

38 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics38 Lesson review (cont’d) Three levels of government in the United States: national, state, and local Two types of governments: dictatorships and democracies Dictatorship: control by one person or a small group of people

39 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics39 Lesson review (cont’d) Direct democracy: all citizens take part in government matters and vote firsthand Representative democracy: citizens choose a smaller group of people to represent and govern them

40 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics40 Lesson review (cont’d) Principles of American democracy Free, fair, and competitive elections Equal weight to every citizen’s vote Majority rule with respect for minority rights

41 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics41 Lesson review (cont’d) Other principles of American democracy include The rule of law Limited government Consent of the governed Protection of individual rights Representative government

42 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics42 Lesson review (cont’d) American citizens have been born on U.S. soil or born to U.S. citizens. Naturalization is the legal process by which foreigners become American citizens. Aliens are people who live in the United States but are not U.S. citizens.

43 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics43 Lesson review (cont’d) The millions of illegal aliens who live in the United States risk being deported. Legal aliens lead lives much like American citizens, but they do not have full political rights and must carry I.D. cards at all times.

44 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics44 Lesson review (cont’d) A citizen’s legal duties include Obeying laws Paying taxes Defending the nation Serving in court Attending school

45 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics45 Lesson review (cont’d) A citizen’s civic responsibilities include Being informed Speaking up and voting Respecting others’ rights Respecting diversity Contributing to the common good Citizens need to be involved because the government cannot provide everything that communities need.

46 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics46 Lesson review (cont’d) Volunteers work with charitable groups, school-based programs, and national service programs. Benefits of volunteering include Opportunities to learn, make friends, and explore careers Improving teamwork, leadership, and problem-solving skills

47 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics47 Summary What is civics? Why is government needed? What are the functions of government? What are the levels of government? What are the types of governments?

48 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics48 Summary (cont’d) What are the principles of American democracy? Who are America's citizens? Who are the aliens in America? What are a citizen's legal duties?

49 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics49 Summary (cont’d) What are a citizen's civic responsibilities? Why do citizens need to be involved? Where can volunteers donate their time? What are the benefits of volunteering?

50 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics50 Next Done—The duties and responsibilities of citizenship Next—The Constitution of the United States


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