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Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 1 Team Management and Conflict MANAGEMENT Meeting and.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 1 Team Management and Conflict MANAGEMENT Meeting and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 1 Team Management and Conflict MANAGEMENT Meeting and Exceeding Customer Expectations EIGHTH EDITION Prepared by Deborah Baker Texas Christian University

2 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 2 learning objectives 1. Discuss the nature of teams and the characteristics of effective teams 2. Identify the types of teams that organizations use 3. Discuss potential uses of teams 4. Use decision-making authority as a characteristic by which to distinguish team type 5. Identify and discuss steps in establishing teams 6. Identify and discuss the roles of team members and team leaders

3 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 3 learning objectives (continued) 7. Describe the four stages of team development 8. Discuss team cohesiveness and team norms and their relationship to team performance 9. Evaluate the benefits and costs of teams 10. Discuss the positive and negative aspects of conflict in an organization 11. Identify the sources of conflict in an organization 12. Describe a manager’s role in conflict management and potential strategies to manage conflict

4 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 4 Teams Defined Team A group of two or more people who interact regularly and coordinate their work to accomplish a common objective At least two people must be involved 2. The members must interact regularly and coordinate their work 3. Members of a team must share a common objective

5 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 5 Characteristics of Effective Teams 1 1. Team members are committed. All team members feel free to express themselves and participate in discussions and decisions. Members trust each other. When needs for leadership arise, any member feels free to volunteer. Decisions are made by consensus. As problems occur, the team focuses on causes, not symptoms. Team members are flexible in terms of work processes and problem solving. Team members change and grow. Team members are committed. All team members feel free to express themselves and participate in discussions and decisions. Members trust each other. When needs for leadership arise, any member feels free to volunteer. Decisions are made by consensus. As problems occur, the team focuses on causes, not symptoms. Team members are flexible in terms of work processes and problem solving. Team members change and grow

6 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 6 Types of Teams 2 2 Vertical Team A team composed of a manager and subordinates Horizontal Team A team composed of members drawn from different departments

7 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 7 Vertical and Horizontal Teams 2 2

8 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 8 Types of Teams 3 3 Product Development Teams Project Teams Process Teams Work Teams Work Teams Quality Teams

9 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter 16 9 How to Use Teams 3 3 Product Development Teams Project Teams Work Teams Work Teams Quality Teams Team Options ? Teams ? Teams Process Teams ? Teams ? Teams ? Teams ? Teams

10 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Virtual Teams 3 3 Characteristics. Members are distributed across multiple locations. Membership can be extremely diverse in skills and culture. Team members can join or depart the team in midstream

11 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Team Independence 4 4

12 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Process of Team Building 5 5 Assessing feasibility Identifying priorities Defining mission and objectives Uncovering and eliminating barriers to team building Uncovering and eliminating barriers to team building Starting with small teams Planning for training needs Planning to empower Planning for feedback and development time Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8

13 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Kinds of Barriers 5 5 Cultural Barriers Cultural Barriers Process Barriers Process Barriers Subject Matter Barriers Subject Matter Barriers

14 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Habit Changes in Team Systems 5 5. Individuals who used to compete will have to learn to collaborate. Workers who used to be paid for individual efforts will be rewarded based on team efforts. Supervisors who used to be directive in their style will have to become facilitative, coaching workers instead of giving orders

15 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Team Considerations 5 5 Team size Member roles Team leadership

16 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Member Roles 6 6 Task Specialists Contributor Challenger Initiator Social Specialists Collaborator Communicator Cheerleader Compromiser

17 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Team Leader Skills 6 6 Teamwork and cooperation orientation Teamwork and cooperation orientation Create noncompetitive atmosphere Create noncompetitive atmosphere Renew trust Encourage responsibility Think reasonably Reinforce contributions Reinforce contributions Focus teams on results Focus teams on results Share leadership

18 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Tips for Team Leaders 6 6. Don’t be afraid to admit ignorance. Know when to intervene. Learn to truly share power. Worry about what you take on, not what you give up. Get used to learning the job

19 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Management of Team Processes 7 7 Team Development Stages Team Development Stages Team Cohesiveness Team Norms Team Norms Team Personality Team Personality

20 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Stages of Team Development 7 7 FormingPerformingStormingNorming

21 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Stages of Team Development 7 7 Forming. Members become acquainted. Members test behaviors. Individuals accept the power and authority of formal and informal leaders

22 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Stages of Team Development 7 7 Storming. Disagreement and conflict occur. Personalities emerge. Members assert their opinions. Disagreements may arise. Coalitions or subgroups may emerge. The team is not yet unified

23 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Stages of Team Development 7 7 Norming. Team comes together. Team achieves unity, consensus about who holds power. Team understands member roles. Team has oneness and cohesion

24 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Stages of Team Development 7 7 Performing. Team begins to function and moves toward accomplishing its goals. Team members interact well. Team deals with problems and coordinates work. Team confronts each other if necessary

25 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Team Cohesiveness 8 8 Small Size Frequent Interaction Clear Objectives Success Small Size Frequent Interaction Clear Objectives Success Large Size Infrequent Interaction Unclear Objectives Failure Large Size Infrequent Interaction Unclear Objectives Failure HighCohesivenessHighCohesiveness Failure to Achieve Objectives Low Morale Low Morale Objective Achievement High Morale High Morale LowCohesivenessLowCohesiveness Team Factors Degree of Cohesiveness Results

26 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Team Cohesiveness 8 8 B Moderate Productivity C Low-to-Moderate Productivity A High Productivity D Low Productivity Team Cohesiveness Team Performance Norms Low High HighLow

27 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Benefits of Teams 9 9 Synergy Skills and Knowledge Flexibility Commitment

28 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Costs of Teams 9 9 Power-Realignment Costs Training Expenses Free-Riding Costs Lost Productivity Loss of Productive Workers

29 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Approaches to Conflict 10 Traditional View Manager views conflict as unnecessary and harmful to an organization and eliminates all evidence of it Behavioral View Behavioral View Manager expects conflict and believes that it can create positive results Interactionist View Manager attempts to harness conflict to maximize its positive potential for growth and to minimize its negative effects

30 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Positive & Negative Aspects of Conflict 10 Dysfunctional Conflict Functional Conflict Limits the organization’s ability to achieve its objectives Supports the objectives of the organization

31 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Sources of Conflict 11 Differences ObjectivesAttitudes ValuesPerceptions ObjectivesAttitudes ValuesPerceptions Disagreements Role requirements Work activities Individual approaches Role requirements Work activities Individual approaches Breakdowns Communication Competition Individuals Limited resources Individuals Limited resources

32 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Analysis of the Conflict Situation What is the source of conflict? 1. Who is in conflict? 3. What is the level of conflict?

33 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Development of a Strategy 12 Avoidance Smoothing Compromise Collaboration Confrontation Appeals to Superordinate Objectives Decisions by a Third Party

34 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Conflict Stimulation 12 Circumstances in which a manager might stimulate conflict. When team members exhibit and accept minimal performance. When people appear to be afraid to do anything other than the norm. When team members passively accept events or behavior that should motivate action

35 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Strategies to Stimulate Conflict Change the rules 3. Change the organization 4. Change managers 1. Bring in an outsider 5. Encourage competition

36 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Strategies to Stimulate Conflict 12 Benefits for managers who choose to encourage competition. An increase in cohesion within the competitive group. An increased focus on task accomplishment. An increase in organization and efficiency

37 Copyright ©2005 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved Chapter Strategies to Stimulate Conflict 12 Encouraging competition can produce negative consequences. Communication between competitors can decrease or cease to exist. The competition may be perceived as an enemy. Open hostility may develop between competitors. One competitor can sabotage the efforts of another


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