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I3: Inquiry, Independence and Information MBA Suite Media City 19 th April 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "I3: Inquiry, Independence and Information MBA Suite Media City 19 th April 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 I3: Inquiry, Independence and Information MBA Suite Media City 19 th April 2012

2 Defining inquiry Modes of inquiry-based learning (ibl) Why ibl Some design principles Outline

3 What is inquiry? Take some post-it notes and write down your answer to the above question (one answer per post-it!) Once youre done, please stick your post-its on the wall Try to cluster them together with linked concepts Youve got 5 minutes…

4 4 defining ibl (a) (Levy 2009) See also: Healey & Jenkins, 2009; Spronken-Smith et al Designed around students engaging in a process of inquiry Emphasises students capacity to construct knowledge -investigating authentic, often open- ended, questions or themes -adopting the practices of scholarship or research of their disciplines or professional area -exploring a knowledge-base actively and potentially contributing new knowledge to it

5 5 defining ibl (b) (Levy 2009) See also: Healey & Jenkins, 2009; Spronken-Smith et al Encourages peer-to-peer collaboration, and partnership (students and staff) Provides support for inquiry in the form of activities, assessments, resources, facilitation, learning environments Provides guidance on relevant inquiry methods, including how to frame good questions Provides support for development of information literacy, critical thinking, self- reflection and other capabilities Creates opportunities for students to share the results of their inquiries with peers and others

6 6 A perspective on problem-based learning vs. inquiry-based learning ibl triggers vary open-ended as regards content and answers may be driven by students own questions flexible process, not always collaborative pbl scenario-driven oriented toward specific content and already- existing answers problems set by tutors standard collaborative and facilitated process See also:

7 Perspectives on ibl and research 7 A differentiated view: ibl as research-like learning that can be carried out at any level of sophistication but differs from experiences in which students actually conduct research leading to outcomes of interest and value to the research community (Elton, 2008: 138) An inclusive view: ibl in different modes having potential both to engage students with an existing knowledge-base and with the production of new knowledge (following Bereiter, 2002: knowledge construction and knowledge building)

8 8 modes of ibl (Levy 2009) - based on research with staff and students at Sheffield See also: Healey, 2005

9 9 Inquiry for Learning Identifying: ibl tasks are primarily designed to involve students in interacting with a knowledge-base in response to questions, problems, scenarios or lines of inquiry formulated by staff (what is already known on this topic?) Pursuing: ibl tasks are designed primarily to involve students in interacting with a knowledge-base by pursuing questions, problems, scenarios or lines of inquiry they themselves have formulated (what is already known on my topic?)

10 10 Inquiry for Knowledge Building Producing: ibl tasks are designed primarily to involve students in addressing open questions, problems, scenarios or lines of inquiry, as formulated by tutors, in interaction with the relevant knowledge-base (how can I answer this open question?) Authoring: ibl tasks are designed primarily to involve students in addressing their own open questions, problems, scenarios or lines of inquiry in interaction with the relevant knowledge-base (how can I answer my open question?)

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12 12 why ibl? fosters active and deep approaches to learning students develop capabilities for knowledge work, citizenship and lifelong learning students experiencesupercomplexity (Barnett) and how knowledge is created students develop attributes of critical being (Barnett), self-authorship (Baxter-Magolda) and epistemic fluency (Goodyear)

13 Themes from ibl research 13 improved grades, improved retention at university, intellectual and personal development (epistemological change, increases in confidence), changed conceptions of learning and teaching, better collegial relationships, more independent thinking and working (see Healey & Jenkins 2009 for summary) inquiry activities identified as high impact and appropriate for the first year upwards (Kift 2009; Land & Gordon 2008): but positive effects may be stronger for middle and high performing students (Kuh 2008) - support strategies needed to maximise desired outcomes

14 Some key design principles 14 Establish desired outcomes Make the inquiry task central Align assessment with goals (process and product) Engage students prior knowledge Build in reflection, dialogue, feedback, collaboration…. Support development of inquiry and process capabilities

15 student inquiry activities assess- ments inform- ation spaces tech- nologies tutoring collab- oration dissem- ination

16 Process support strategies 16 Tasks, resources and facilitation approaches that explicitly focus on supporting learners to engage effectively with the process (rather than the subject-matter) of their inquiry e.g. for information literacy development

17 Information literacy Knowing when and why you need information, where to find it, and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner. (CILIP: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals: vocacy/informationliterac y/definition/default.htm) vocacy/informationliterac y/definition/default.htm SCONUL 7 Pillars of Information Literacy


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