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1 Exploring stakeholder perspectives regarding a global curriculum – A case study Fenella Galpin & Dr Sharon Slade – OUBS Dr Paul Prinsloo – Unisa, South.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Exploring stakeholder perspectives regarding a global curriculum – A case study Fenella Galpin & Dr Sharon Slade – OUBS Dr Paul Prinsloo – Unisa, South."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Exploring stakeholder perspectives regarding a global curriculum – A case study Fenella Galpin & Dr Sharon Slade – OUBS Dr Paul Prinsloo – Unisa, South Africa TIS International Conference - Internationalisation of Pedagogy and Curriculum in Higher Education: Exploring New Frontiers - 16/17 June 2011

2 2 Agenda Background to the study Survey Initial results Future work Acknowledgements Dr Paul Prinsloo, Acting Head: Institute for Open and Distance Learning, University of South Africa (UNISA) Ms Jan Jones, Learning & Teaching Development Officer, IET, Open University (OU)

3 3 Background This study set out to explore: Different stakeholder perceptions of the content of a (global) MBA curriculum Issues that students as future global managers think that they might face Student preferences in delivery, ways of studying Differences between stakeholder groups –Students studying with face to face tutorials v online tutorials –Non graduate v graduate entry students –Faculty staff –Tutors –Sponsors

4 4 The Questionnaire What are the perceptions of how an MBA should prepare students for managing in multinational and international contexts? Drafted and piloted summer 2010 Sent to 2000+ people in 5 stakeholder groups – –students studying stage 1 of the OUBS MBA in late 2009 or early 2010, tutors, central faculty, administrative and regional staff, employers/sponsors UK/non UK students 3:1, other factors, e.g., gender were random Students – own perspective. Others – own and student perspective 12 questions, some tick box, some ranking, some free text Reminder sent after 2 weeks. Survey live for 4 weeks Thematic analysis

5 5 Response rates – over 570 responses Stake- holders Potential responses Complete responses Response rate * Incomplete responses Response Rate Total no. responses Response Rate Students212332715.4%1798.4%50623.9% Tutors793139.2%1215.2%4354.4% Faculty14535.7%5 1071.4% Administra tor 17635.3%211.7%847.1% Employers63711.1%57.9%1219.1% * The percentage of complete responses from most stakeholder groups is significant

6 6 Split of student courses Module% of respondents non graduate with face to face tuition28.5 non graduate with online tuition*10.1 graduate with face to face tuition45.8 non graduate with online tuition*15.6 * Online students are a lower % of total student respondents because there are fewer students studying online

7 7 Why did students register for an international MBA? 1,492 responses from students were coded and classified into themes, such as –career progression- sponsored by employer –personal development- the status of the MBA –to improve management skills- increase in knowledge –for the qualification adding value to their organisations –networking and other The most provided reason was –career progression (28%) –personal development and self-improvement (17%) –increase in knowledge/expertise (15%) –and improving management skills (9%).

8 8 What is the most important challenge managers face? Individual responses coded and classified into the following themes: The changing context people management stakeholder/shareholder and network management resource management project management developing as manager information and knowledge management and ICTs sustaining growth and strategic planning and leadership ethical and environmental issues personal relationship with seniors and organisational hierarchy multicultural issues and other

9 9 Challenges by stakeholder group StudentsTutorsFaculty and administrators Sponsors 1 People management The changing context* The changing context The changing context; people management 2 Developing as manager/ becoming a leader Developing as manager Resource management Developing as a manager Ethics 3 Sustaining growth/ strategic planning/ leadership *Students ranked the changing context as 4 th most important challenge while the other stakeholders consider it to be the most important challenge managers face. People management Personal Sustaining growth

10 10 Challenges by student groups Non-graduatesGraduatesOnlineFace-to-face 1 People management 2 Sustaining growth/ strategic planning/ leadership Developing as manager The changing context* Developing as manager 3 Sustaining growth/ strategic planning/ leadership PersonalSustaining growth/ strategic planning/ leadership Online students more aware of the changing context and more concerned about work/life balance than f2f students More mature students were more concerned with the changing context than younger students who had greater focus on strategic issues and manager development.

11 11 What is the most important skill managers need? Individual responses coded and classified into the following themes: Communication skillsdelegation analytical and critical thinkingfinancial and numeracy skills networking with & between different stakeholders knowledgeable and expertise leadership and strategic thinking people management skills time managementwillingness to learn plan, organise and manage processes change management integrity/credibilitycreativity emotional intelligencelistening

12 12 Analysis of surveyed groups StudentsTutorsFaculty and administrators Sponsors 1People skillsLeadership and strategic thinking People management 2Leadership and strategic thinking People skills Other People skillsCommunication skills; Willingness to learn; Plan, organise 3Communication skills * * Very high for students and sponsors but not for tutors and faculty Financial and numeracy skills Emotional intelligence --

13 13 Analysis of student groups Non-graduatesGraduatesOnlineFace-to-face 1Leadership and strategic thinking People management/ skills Leadership and strategic thinking People management/ skills 2 Leadership and strategic thinking People management/ skills Leadership and strategic thinking 3Communication skills Non UK/European students rated communication skills more highly than others (presumably as including those with English as a second language. More mature students were less likely to mention leadership skills, perhaps reflecting existing positions in organisation. They were also more likely to suggest important of financial and numeracy skills.

14 List at least 3 advantages of working in cross cultural student groups My network containing contacts of fellow students from all over the world is my most precious treasure. lower fees due to greater contributions from internationals. Less congestion in car parks at venues for residential school, as foreigners tend to take public transport. I work in an international environment so for me it is just business as usual. Ive gained as much from my fellow students and their views as from the course material. multitude of approaches…. breadth of knowledge.

15 15 List at least 3 advantages of working in cross cultural student groups Diversity of views and experience that is brought to and shared within the group – most cited advantage (45% of all students) Non graduate entry students higher than graduate entry on having perceptions challenged Graduate entry and online tutored students higher than non graduate entry students on appreciating differences and increasing respect for others. This was the most cited advantage among tutors. Tutors tended to give more detailed responses than students, and gave a wider spread of responses. Employers most cited advantage was adding to personal skill set, e.g. language skills (a more tangible benefit – to be expected perhaps). Other categories included mirrors todays workplace, networking

16 Analysis of surveyed groups StudentsTutorsFaculty and administrators Sponsors 1Diversity of views and experience brought and shared Encourages appreciation of differences and respect for other cultures Diversity of views and experience brought and shared Adds to personal skills set, e.g. languages 2Encourages appreciation of differences and respect for other cultures Diversity of views and experience brought and shared Encourages appreciation of differences and respect for other cultures 3Opens the mind/challenges perceptions and assumptions Networking opportunities Diversity of views and experience brought and shared

17 17 List at least 3 challenges for cross cultural student groups Including students with poor levels of English as second language may mean poorer collaboration outcomes for both parties…. we all lost out. when we meet at tutorials we dont actually get to socially interact, therefore often reducing the value of having a diverse group. sometimes you just have enough to do trying to sort out problems in your own environment, and dont have time trying to understand other environments. Are cultural/national differences the most important? I got more out of the fact that they were from different organisational backgrounds.

18 18 List at least 3 challenges for cross cultural student groups The main challenges cited by all stakeholders related to: –Dealing with language differences –Dealing with cultural differences –Time taken in establishing a shared frame of reference Some advantages listed were also noted as challenges e.g. communication can be both an advantage and a challenge, diversity of views is an advantage though gaining a shared understanding out of those is a challenge. Tutors cited challenges of course design (reflective practice, critical engagement) not suiting some cultures.

19 19 Curriculum content preferences of the stakeholder groups: Students most interested in: people mgt, strategy, financial mgt, marketing and creativity Faculty most interested in: international and intercultural issues Sponsors most interested in: people mgt, project mgt Low interest from all in: ethics, law, corporate citizenship, environmental issues

20 20 Conclusions- general Differences between stakeholders views Important to all for range of case studies across sectors (faculty and sponsors most strongly; face to face tuition and graduate students least strongly) Less important to students that cases have a global reach Less important to sponsors to apply learning to internationally diverse contexts Wider benefits of cross cultural study (e.g. Networking) not always recognised by faculty Online tutored students much more interested in working with internationally diverse student group, and with more focus on communication skills and changing contexts

21 21 Implications for Curriculum Development & Implementation Challenges of single or multiple contexts in curriculum, e.g. people management Mix of students in tutor groups Tutor recruitment and development Role of technology in student and tutor support Different approaches to learning and delivery of learning Accreditation bodies

22 22 Next steps Future questions: Values of global managers Challenges of moving to new country/cultural context What else might a global MBA contain Meaning of international/global MBA Future direction: Focus groups to follow up specific themes Impact on curriculum design Impact on presentation issues Tutor development Noting the differences in stakeholder views Tailoring marketing messages to different stakeholders/market segments

23 23 A programme that can transform a student into a good manager and influential leader in any international environment or location… (student quote)

24 24 Thank you Fenella Galpin F.A.V.Galpin@open.ac.uk Sharon Slade s.slade@open.ac.uk


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