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Dissertations Dr Teresa Davies Dr Teresa Davies. Dissertations Dissertations should only be submitted after a proposal, agreed by the appropriate Panel.

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Presentation on theme: "Dissertations Dr Teresa Davies Dr Teresa Davies. Dissertations Dissertations should only be submitted after a proposal, agreed by the appropriate Panel."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dissertations Dr Teresa Davies Dr Teresa Davies

2 Dissertations Dissertations should only be submitted after a proposal, agreed by the appropriate Panel Chair has been accepted by the college – the proposal will be included with the dissertation when submitted to the examiners. Dissertations should only be submitted after a proposal, agreed by the appropriate Panel Chair has been accepted by the college – the proposal will be included with the dissertation when submitted to the examiners.

3 DISSERTATIONS The standard expected is approximately equivalent to that of an MSc project. The project does not need to break new ground but should show that the candidate has followed the scientific method of investigation and has written their report appropriately to a good standard The standard expected is approximately equivalent to that of an MSc project. The project does not need to break new ground but should show that the candidate has followed the scientific method of investigation and has written their report appropriately to a good standard

4 Content ABSTRACT ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION This should place the project in the context of current literature. This would normally be at least a 1000 words (5 pages) and well referenced This should place the project in the context of current literature. This would normally be at least a 1000 words (5 pages) and well referenced

5 Methods The methods used should be well described in standard terms. Any new methods should be written up sufficiently well for another scientist or clinician to follow. The methods used should be well described in standard terms. Any new methods should be written up sufficiently well for another scientist or clinician to follow.

6 Methods If patient groups are used then their recruitment and characteristics should be described. It is very important that if candidates are describing the characteristics of a new test, it is used in all the patients so that its sensitivity and specificity can be described. If the new test is only used in patients discovered positive by another test then it is important that this limitation is identified and sensitivity and specificity are not quoted. Statistical methods should be described If patient groups are used then their recruitment and characteristics should be described. It is very important that if candidates are describing the characteristics of a new test, it is used in all the patients so that its sensitivity and specificity can be described. If the new test is only used in patients discovered positive by another test then it is important that this limitation is identified and sensitivity and specificity are not quoted. Statistical methods should be described

7 RESULTS These should be written up using standard terms. Graphs and tables should be appropriately labelled and placed in the text as appropriate points. Appropriate use of statistics is important These should be written up using standard terms. Graphs and tables should be appropriately labelled and placed in the text as appropriate points. Appropriate use of statistics is important

8 Discussion and Conclusion This should follow naturally from the results. It is important that the conclusions do not go further than the results warrant. The discussion should include current literature.

9 REFERENCES These should be in standard format. Examiners are not expected to check every one, but it is important that some are checked as candidates have been known to get these wrong. These should be in standard format. Examiners are not expected to check every one, but it is important that some are checked as candidates have been known to get these wrong.

10 Any scientific or technical help with the material or investigations should be acknowledged. Any scientific or technical help with the material or investigations should be acknowledged. The most contentious aspect often been the length of the reports – avoid excessive wordiness. The most contentious aspect often been the length of the reports – avoid excessive wordiness.

11 Marking Scheme Candidates have their dissertations graded A, B, or C Candidates have their dissertations graded A, B, or C Grade C should only be used where the work does not follow the project proposal and is completely unsound. Grade C should only be used where the work does not follow the project proposal and is completely unsound.

12 Marking Scheme Grade B should be used where there are remediable errors, usually in the write up. Grade B should be used where there are remediable errors, usually in the write up. It is often difficult for extra work to be undertaken and should not be requested unless it was clearly stated in the proposal and has not been done. It is often difficult for extra work to be undertaken and should not be requested unless it was clearly stated in the proposal and has not been done. Grade A implies satisfactory project work written up to a good standard. Grade A implies satisfactory project work written up to a good standard.

13 Titles of successful written work The plan is to publish in the college bulletin, website regularly – 2008/09 now on website The plan is to publish in the college bulletin, website regularly – 2008/09 now on website

14 Examples of case books Non random abnormalities of chromosome 9 in haematological disorders Non random abnormalities of chromosome 9 in haematological disorders The clinical implications and value of molecular cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies in seven cases of CLL The clinical implications and value of molecular cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies in seven cases of CLL A series of chorionic villus samples displaying chromosomal mosaicism A series of chorionic villus samples displaying chromosomal mosaicism FISH applications in ALL FISH applications in ALL An investigation into the low mutation detection rate for Holt Oram syndrome and the development of a sensitive method for detecting mutations in the TBX5 gene An investigation into the low mutation detection rate for Holt Oram syndrome and the development of a sensitive method for detecting mutations in the TBX5 gene Interpretation dilemmas in prenatal diagnosis following the detection of de novo chromosomes abnormalities with uncertain phenotypic effect Interpretation dilemmas in prenatal diagnosis following the detection of de novo chromosomes abnormalities with uncertain phenotypic effect Case studies in molecular genetic analysis of inherited metabolic disorders Case studies in molecular genetic analysis of inherited metabolic disorders

15 Examples of casebooks Molecular analysis of the UGATA1 Tata Box in a gene family associate with Crigler-Najjar and Gilbert syndrome Molecular analysis of the UGATA1 Tata Box in a gene family associate with Crigler-Najjar and Gilbert syndrome Enhanced interpretation of malignancy cases by molecular cytogenetic techniques Enhanced interpretation of malignancy cases by molecular cytogenetic techniques Variant translocations in Oncology Variant translocations in Oncology Molecular cytogenetic techniques and their use in delineating constitutional cytogenetic abnormalities Molecular cytogenetic techniques and their use in delineating constitutional cytogenetic abnormalities Molecular diagnoses in patients/families with mitochondrial disorders or endocrine disorders Molecular diagnoses in patients/families with mitochondrial disorders or endocrine disorders The clinical significance of constitutional and acquired cytogenesiss abnormalities illustrated by reference to abnormalities of chromosome 1 The clinical significance of constitutional and acquired cytogenesiss abnormalities illustrated by reference to abnormalities of chromosome 1 Interpretation dilemmas in prenatal diagnosis following the detection of de novo chromosomes abnormalities with uncertain phenotypic effect Interpretation dilemmas in prenatal diagnosis following the detection of de novo chromosomes abnormalities with uncertain phenotypic effect Molecular genetic investigations of inherited cancers and haematological malignancies Molecular genetic investigations of inherited cancers and haematological malignancies

16 Examples of dissertations Comparison of the uses and validity of offering techniques in the identification of genetic abnormality and diagnosis of haematological disease Comparison of the uses and validity of offering techniques in the identification of genetic abnormality and diagnosis of haematological disease Syndromic and non syndromic hearing loss- development of a molecular genetic clinical service Syndromic and non syndromic hearing loss- development of a molecular genetic clinical service Evaluation of DNA array technology as a diagnostic tool Evaluation of DNA array technology as a diagnostic tool Introduction of DHPLC technology into a diagnostic DNA laboratory Introduction of DHPLC technology into a diagnostic DNA laboratory Establishment of a molecular genetic service for Pelizaeus Merzbacher Disease and Spastic Paraplegia type 2 Establishment of a molecular genetic service for Pelizaeus Merzbacher Disease and Spastic Paraplegia type 2 Molecular diagnosis of hereditary NPCC Molecular diagnosis of hereditary NPCC An investigation into the low mutation detection rate for Holt Oram syndrome and the development of a sensitive method for detecting mutations in the TBX5 gene An investigation into the low mutation detection rate for Holt Oram syndrome and the development of a sensitive method for detecting mutations in the TBX5 gene Molecular genetic analysis of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome Molecular genetic analysis of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome The development of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as a diagnostic tool in inherited peripheral neuropathies The development of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as a diagnostic tool in inherited peripheral neuropathies Distribution and frequency of mutations identified within the mismatch repair genes hMLH1 and hMSH2 associated with HNPCC and their predicted pathogenic effect Distribution and frequency of mutations identified within the mismatch repair genes hMLH1 and hMSH2 associated with HNPCC and their predicted pathogenic effect The development of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as a diagnostic tool in inherited peripheral neuropathies The development of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as a diagnostic tool in inherited peripheral neuropathies

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18 What are the examiners looking for ?

19 Marking and Feedback Two examines mark independently Two examines mark independently If disagreement goes to panel chair for casting vote If disagreement goes to panel chair for casting vote If B or C feedback will be given as to what is needed If B or C feedback will be given as to what is needed Work resubmitted goes back to original al examiners Work resubmitted goes back to original al examiners

20 Casebooks

21 ACCEPTABLEBORDERLINEUNACCEPTABLE Number of cases Within guidelines set by Specialty Minimum number in guidelines Less than the minimum Type of cases A good mix illustrating different problems Some cases illustrating the same problems Cases do not show broad experience across the specialty Discussion Discussion places cases in the context of literature. Excessive or patchy discussion of cases. Insufficient reference to literature but essentially shows has understood underlying pathology and impact on clinical management. Inadequate discussion with no reference to literature or missing important work in the area. Conclusions stated which cannot be drawn from case history. References Standard style, adequate coverage of literature. Standard style, but insufficient references to really cover the literature although main work referenced Non-standard style, missing or incorrect references.

22 ACCEPTABLEBORDERLINEUNACCEPTABLE Illustrations Clear, well labelled illustrations pertinent to text. Poor labelling of illustrations or poor use of appropriate illustrations. Illustrations that are irrelevant to the case or do not add to the case history. Use of English Clear, appropriate use of English, properly spell checked. Occasional typo acceptable. Obvious typos but not too many. Poor English grammar (though bear in mind candidates for whom English is not first language – meaning must be clear). Too many typos (>1 per page), meaning obscured by poor use of English. Construction Good division into cases, well laid out with brief introduction and summary. Poor layout making it difficult to follow but essentials of cases are clear. Cases merged or inadequately separated

23 Dissertations

24 All dissertations should be considered overall. Any dissertation with a section which is unacceptable should be considered for a rewrite. Dissertations which are mostly acceptable with occasional borderline areas (for example occasional typos or rather long winded introduction) may be considered for an A overall if borderline areas do not detract from the principal results and conclusions of the work. The remainder should be returned for rewriting. All dissertations should be considered overall. Any dissertation with a section which is unacceptable should be considered for a rewrite. Dissertations which are mostly acceptable with occasional borderline areas (for example occasional typos or rather long winded introduction) may be considered for an A overall if borderline areas do not detract from the principal results and conclusions of the work. The remainder should be returned for rewriting.

25 AcceptableBorderlineUnacceptable Introduction Clear description of project, put into context of current literature. Project poorly described, too long or too short Inadequately referenced. Shows no understanding of current literature or project design. Methods Appropriate description of methods, patients, samples, statistics. Bare descriptions, could be followed with difficulty. Patient groups not well delineated Methods missing or inadequately described. No statistical methods. Patient groups inadequately discussed. Ethical approval (where required) Not mentioned. Results Clear description of principal results. Scrappy descriptions of results, in poor order of presentation but main results described Inadequate use of tables or graphs for results. Poor descriptions which do not make results clear.

26 AcceptableBorderlineUnacceptable Discussion Discussion places results in the context of literature. Conclusions correctly drawn from results. Excessive or patchy discussion of results. Insufficient reference to literature but essentially shows has understood impact of results. Inadequate discussion with no reference to literature or missing important work in the area. Conclusions stated which cannot be drawn from results. References Standard style, adequate coverage of literature. Standard style, but insufficient references to really over the literature although main work referenced. Non-standard style, missing or incorrect references. Diagrams/ Graphics Clear, well labelled diagrams and graphs using appropriate scales It is difficult to visualise from the, tables and graphs the main points of results. Poor use of scales and labelling of axis. Insufficient or unlabelled diagrams, tables and graphs of results. Use of scales that distort results.

27 AcceptableBorderlineUnacceptable Use of English Clear, appropriate use of English, properly spell checked. Occasional typo acceptable. Obvious typos but not too many. Poor English grammar (though bear in mind candidates for whom English is not first language – meaning must be clear). Too many typos (>1 per page), meaning obscured by poor use of English. Construction Good division into introduction, method, results and conclusion. Merging of results and conclusions occasionally acceptable for some projects. Division between sections not well observed. Methods in introduction, new results stated in discussion.

28 Examiner guidelines All dissertations should be considered overall. Any dissertation with a section which is unacceptable should be considered for a rewrite All dissertations should be considered overall. Any dissertation with a section which is unacceptable should be considered for a rewrite Dissertations which are mostly acceptable with occasional borderline areas (for example occasional typos or rather longwinded introduction) may be considered for an A overall if borderline areas do not detract from the principal results and conclusions of the work Dissertations which are mostly acceptable with occasional borderline areas (for example occasional typos or rather longwinded introduction) may be considered for an A overall if borderline areas do not detract from the principal results and conclusions of the work The remainder should be returned for rewriting The remainder should be returned for rewriting The dissertation cannot be rejected at the written stage if the Examiner considers that there is an inadequate project design The dissertation cannot be rejected at the written stage if the Examiner considers that there is an inadequate project design if this was passed by the Panel Chair if this was passed by the Panel Chair

29 Examiner feedback Work graded A do not require feedback Work graded B will have a report on a separate sheet This should contain nonperjorative comments designed to help the candidate rewrite their submissions. Where possible examples of errors should be quoted. Examiners should avoid sarcasm. The intention of feedback is for the candidate to produce work which will get an A at the next attempt

30 Examiner comments References not presented in a consistent manner References not presented in a consistent manner FISH probe loci not presented in a consistent manner FISH probe loci not presented in a consistent manner Incorrect references - the examiners will probably know most of them and may check Incorrect references - the examiners will probably know most of them and may check Methods incomplete - e.g. methods refer to bone marrows but bloods also included Methods incomplete - e.g. methods refer to bone marrows but bloods also included Use of abbreviations Use of abbreviations Accuracy and typos Accuracy and typos Clinical details patchy Clinical details patchy Introduction was brief and offers an uncritical summary of the literature Introduction was brief and offers an uncritical summary of the literature In introduction textbook references are provided - although appropriate in some cases the candidate would be expected to cite original publications In introduction textbook references are provided - although appropriate in some cases the candidate would be expected to cite original publications Sources of figures of not candidates own should be acknowledged Sources of figures of not candidates own should be acknowledged

31 Examiner comments There should be a critical appraisal of techniques used in the clinical context of the cases presented There should be a critical appraisal of techniques used in the clinical context of the cases presented The candidate should demonstrate an up to date knowledge and understanding of where diagnostic testing is moving to in the future and an awareness of potential impact of new molecular tests The candidate should demonstrate an up to date knowledge and understanding of where diagnostic testing is moving to in the future and an awareness of potential impact of new molecular tests Each cases ahs a materials and methods section, to reduce repetition these should be combined into a single section Each cases ahs a materials and methods section, to reduce repetition these should be combined into a single section The content of the introduction and discussion should be reviewed and restructured - some things need moving from discussion to introduction The content of the introduction and discussion should be reviewed and restructured - some things need moving from discussion to introduction Images of variable quality Images of variable quality Comment on the sensitivity of the methodologies Comment on the sensitivity of the methodologies RNA studies require further development - what further development RNA studies require further development - what further development A diagram of the mutations identified would be useful A diagram of the mutations identified would be useful

32 Examiner comments Various clinical criteria are referenced but not explained Various clinical criteria are referenced but not explained The candidate states it has low specificity - what is the specificity The candidate states it has low specificity - what is the specificity Information is there but mixed up and could be presented in a way that is a lot clearer Information is there but mixed up and could be presented in a way that is a lot clearer The patient groups should be identified in the methods The patient groups should be identified in the methods Figure legends should be more informative Figure legends should be more informative In figure 14 and 15 Patients name is evident and should be removed In figure 14 and 15 Patients name is evident and should be removed The quality of G banded images included was inadequate to confirm the interpretation of the abnormalities reported The quality of G banded images included was inadequate to confirm the interpretation of the abnormalities reported The aim of the casebook is stated as being…..this would be a very tall order The aim of the casebook is stated as being…..this would be a very tall order

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34 Questions and answers

35 Question Is it possible to combine routes – e.g. papers plus dissertation? Is it possible to combine routes – e.g. papers plus dissertation?

36 Answer No but …. No but …. Can use papers as case reports Can use papers as case reports Can use work from PhD in dissertation Can use work from PhD in dissertation Needs to be up to date and/or include discussion of current practice Needs to be up to date and/or include discussion of current practice

37 Question How do you go about submitting your proposal for approval? How do you go about submitting your proposal for approval?

38 Answer See information on college website See information on college website All go to Chair of exam panel for approval – usually quite quick All go to Chair of exam panel for approval – usually quite quick

39 Question Is there a time of year you need to make proposals? Is there a time of year you need to make proposals?

40 Answer Can be submitted any time Can be submitted any time Not advised to undertake work before proposal accepted – some do get rejected Not advised to undertake work before proposal accepted – some do get rejected Once proposal approved you cannot submit a different project – the proposal and written work will both go to the examiner! Once proposal approved you cannot submit a different project – the proposal and written work will both go to the examiner!

41 Question Timescale from proposal to submission? Timescale from proposal to submission?

42 Answer Three years – there were some in my filing cabinet that are > 10 years old! Three years – there were some in my filing cabinet that are > 10 years old! Can be extended if special circumstances – eg mat leave, apply to the college Can be extended if special circumstances – eg mat leave, apply to the college Work must reflect current practice Work must reflect current practice

43 Question Is the college strict on dates it will accept them for the next oral exam Is the college strict on dates it will accept them for the next oral exam

44 Answer The finished project must be submitted at least 4 months before the beginning of the part 2 (allow 6) examination period for which the candidate wishes to enter The finished project must be submitted at least 4 months before the beginning of the part 2 (allow 6) examination period for which the candidate wishes to enter The college cannot guarantee that a project will be marked in time for the candidate to undertake the examination if The college cannot guarantee that a project will be marked in time for the candidate to undertake the examination if * It is submitted less than 4 months before the beginning of the examination period (ie Jan) * It is submitted less than 4 months before the beginning of the examination period (ie Jan) *It is submitted more than 4 months in advance but has to be returned to the candidate for amendments *It is submitted more than 4 months in advance but has to be returned to the candidate for amendments

45 Applications for the part 2 viva may be submitted whilst the written option is still under consideration by examiners, but entry to the exam will not be confirmed until the written option has been awarded a pass mark Applications for the part 2 viva may be submitted whilst the written option is still under consideration by examiners, but entry to the exam will not be confirmed until the written option has been awarded a pass mark Candidates who withdraw from their part 2 exam while their written option is under consideration will not forfeit their fee Candidates who withdraw from their part 2 exam while their written option is under consideration will not forfeit their fee

46 Do not add to your stress levels and submit well in advance! Do not add to your stress levels and submit well in advance!

47 Question Would the inclusion of molecular genetic analysis be expected in a cyto dissertation? Would the inclusion of molecular genetic analysis be expected in a cyto dissertation?

48 Answer Not expected but it would be acceptable and will become increasingly common Not expected but it would be acceptable and will become increasingly common A cytogeneticist could include a predominately molecular dissertation as long as it was related to cytogenetics as it is a cytogenetics exam A cytogeneticist could include a predominately molecular dissertation as long as it was related to cytogenetics as it is a cytogenetics exam Also molecular work could include some cytogenetics Also molecular work could include some cytogenetics

49 Question Can the dissertation include practical work that you have carried out in the last few years? Can the dissertation include practical work that you have carried out in the last few years?

50 Answer Yes as long as not too old > 5 years Yes as long as not too old > 5 years Undertaken during candidates period of training for FRCPath Undertaken during candidates period of training for FRCPath For a PhD probably not acceptable if undertaken prior to part 1 – could be written up as a dissertation For a PhD probably not acceptable if undertaken prior to part 1 – could be written up as a dissertation Allows assessment of the practical ability of candidates based on work performed in the dept in which they are employed. Allows assessment of the practical ability of candidates based on work performed in the dept in which they are employed. It should arise from the normal work and interests of the dept It should arise from the normal work and interests of the dept

51 Question For a casebook is it better to include a variety of cases with a common theme? For a casebook is it better to include a variety of cases with a common theme?

52 Answer The casebook should include discussion of the significance of various findings and a survey of relevant literature. The casebook should include discussion of the significance of various findings and a survey of relevant literature. This is better with a theme (s) and not unrelated cases This is better with a theme (s) and not unrelated cases

53 The Standard of writing should be equivalent to that expected for publication as a case report in a professional scientific journal. The casebook does not need to include only unique cases but should show a breadth of experience of the specialty and should show that the candidate is familiar with the workup of a complex or unusual case and has written their report appropriately to a good standard. The Standard of writing should be equivalent to that expected for publication as a case report in a professional scientific journal. The casebook does not need to include only unique cases but should show a breadth of experience of the specialty and should show that the candidate is familiar with the workup of a complex or unusual case and has written their report appropriately to a good standard.

54 Question What degree of specialization, i.e. constitutional vs. haemato-oncology, is tolerated during the oral examination in cases where the applicants have no prospect to actively practice one of the two specialties. What degree of specialization, i.e. constitutional vs. haemato-oncology, is tolerated during the oral examination in cases where the applicants have no prospect to actively practice one of the two specialties.

55 Answer None - The exam is the same for all candidates so prepare accordingly None - The exam is the same for all candidates so prepare accordingly

56 Question If you plan & oversee development of services but use technicians to help with the practical work, can this still be counted as "your" work? If you plan & oversee development of services but use technicians to help with the practical work, can this still be counted as "your" work?

57 Answer It is unlikely anyone would have done everything themselves – acknowledge work that is not your own. It is unlikely anyone would have done everything themselves – acknowledge work that is not your own.

58

59 Part 2 viva

60 Remember that Fellowship of the Royal College of Pathologists is a mark of professional standing and esteem

61 Part 2 viva questions Not released – all candidates on the same exam will get the same questions, arranged in advance and marking scheme agreed Not released – all candidates on the same exam will get the same questions, arranged in advance and marking scheme agreed Cover three main areas – must pass in all three Cover three main areas – must pass in all three Scientific knowledge relevant to their branch of genetics including RECENT literature Scientific knowledge relevant to their branch of genetics including RECENT literature Ability to apply BASIC knowledge appropriately in a clinical context Ability to apply BASIC knowledge appropriately in a clinical context Understanding of lab organization, and direction, including principles of budget control, quality control, safety and staff management Understanding of lab organization, and direction, including principles of budget control, quality control, safety and staff management

62 To achieve FRCPath by exam you will have Passed 2 x 3 hour written papers Passed 2 x 3 hour written papers Passed 2 x 3 hour practical papers – no viva Passed 2 x 3 hour practical papers – no viva Passed written work = work based (casebook etc) Passed written work = work based (casebook etc) Passed 1 hour viva Passed 1 hour viva Completed 8 + years of higher specialist training Completed 8 + years of higher specialist training

63 Why people fail Poor viva skills Practice - in your own lab and with senior staff in other labs Poor viva skills Practice - in your own lab and with senior staff in other labs Forgetting the basic science Forgetting the basic science Not being aware of current literature Not being aware of current literature Not having breadth of knowledge – you will be asked across all areas of service Not having breadth of knowledge – you will be asked across all areas of service Note – there is not always one correct answer – can you argue your case clearly Note – there is not always one correct answer – can you argue your case clearly

64 The Examiners Fellows of the College Fellows of the College Passed FRCpath at least 5 years ago Passed FRCpath at least 5 years ago CG = 11 MG = 15 - Not all examine all parts CG = 11 MG = 15 - Not all examine all parts Part 1 exam for 2 years - overlap for continuity Part 1 exam for 2 years - overlap for continuity Co ordinated by panel chair and College exam committee Co ordinated by panel chair and College exam committee

65 Examiners…. Sign up for 5 years Sign up for 5 years Job description and code of practice Job description and code of practice Examiner training Examiner training

66 Egregious errors An extremely serious error of a proposed action or actions made in response to a question that is dangerous and has a high likelihood of causing serious harm to the life or well being of a patient or others – will automatically be classed as borderline – outcome will depend on performance in rest of the exam An extremely serious error of a proposed action or actions made in response to a question that is dangerous and has a high likelihood of causing serious harm to the life or well being of a patient or others – will automatically be classed as borderline – outcome will depend on performance in rest of the exam

67 Key dates Closing date for application for Spring Exams – Jan 7th Closing date for application for Spring Exams – Jan 7th Exam held between March 21st and May 6 th – viva 14 th April Exam held between March 21st and May 6 th – viva 14 th April Examiners are not selected until after the closing date as we dont know how many and to avoid examining staff within own lab Examiners are not selected until after the closing date as we dont know how many and to avoid examining staff within own lab

68 Part 2 - frequency Due to small numbers of candidates and need for 2 examiners each time the part 2 viva is now only held once per year in the Spring Due to small numbers of candidates and need for 2 examiners each time the part 2 viva is now only held once per year in the Spring

69 Sources of information The College Website The College Website Exam regs and guidelines Exam regs and guidelines Genetics regs Genetics regs Candidate info Candidate info FAQ FAQ All on RCPath website All on RCPath website

70 Examiner guidelines All dissertations should be considered overall. Any dissertation with a section which is unacceptable should be considered for a rewrite All dissertations should be considered overall. Any dissertation with a section which is unacceptable should be considered for a rewrite Dissertations which are mostly acceptable with occasional borderline areas (for example occasional typos or rather longwinded introduction) may be considered for an A overall if borderline areas do not detract from the principal results and conclusions of the work Dissertations which are mostly acceptable with occasional borderline areas (for example occasional typos or rather longwinded introduction) may be considered for an A overall if borderline areas do not detract from the principal results and conclusions of the work The remainder should be returned for rewriting The remainder should be returned for rewriting The dissertation cannot be rejected at the written stage if the Examiner considers that there is an inadequate project design The dissertation cannot be rejected at the written stage if the Examiner considers that there is an inadequate project design if this was passed by the Panel Chair if this was passed by the Panel Chair


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