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Human rights and older people in home care: what the EHRC Inquiry means for the social care workforce Gerry Zarb Head of Human Rights in the Public Sector.

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Presentation on theme: "Human rights and older people in home care: what the EHRC Inquiry means for the social care workforce Gerry Zarb Head of Human Rights in the Public Sector."— Presentation transcript:

1 Human rights and older people in home care: what the EHRC Inquiry means for the social care workforce Gerry Zarb Head of Human Rights in the Public Sector 11 th March 2011

2 BACKGROUND TO THE INQUIRY Topic for the Inquiry selected because: 1. It highlights the relevance of human rights to public services and has real practical significance for older people and families. 2.Nature of social care is changing rapidly with an increasing number of care transactions likely to take place at the margins of, or even outside of, regulated care. 2

3 Terms of Reference for the Inquiry To inquire into the extent to which the human rights of older people who require or receive home-based care and support, however funded, are promoted and protected by public authorities, working singly or with others, and the adequacy of the legal and regulatory framework within which they are required and empowered to do so. 3

4 Detailed ToRs The extent to which public authorities are effective in protecting and promoting the human rights of older people Good practice in the promotion and protection of human rights of older people in home based care Public authorities understanding of their duties under the Human Rights Act The extent to which the legal framework for human rights and community care adequately protects and promotes the human rights of older people The extent to which appropriate information, advice and advocacy is provided to older people The extent to which inspectorate and regulatory bodies, including professional regulatory bodies, protect and promote human rights The scope for enhancing the role of inspectorate and regulatory bodies, including professional regulatory bodies, individually and collectively The extent to which older people, including their families have confidence that the system will promote and protect their human rights 4

5 Aims Gathering evidence widely Specific focus on identifying and understanding good practice Identifying workable solutions 5

6 Approach Formal use of legal enforcement powers Non-adversarial and solution focussed approach Engagement 6

7 KEY ISSUES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Much home based care is of a highly personal and sensitive nature and delivered behind closed doors. Most of the attention has been on human rights in institutional settings. Evidence of potential risks to older peoples human rights – more often due to lack of awareness rather than deliberate neglect. 7

8 KEY ISSUES FOR PUBLIC BODIES Lack of clarity about HRA coverage (e.g. for self-funders). Challenge for the regulatory system for care and support to keep pace with the rapidly changing nature of social care. Concerns about Public Bodies level of understanding about their HRA obligations. Challenges for commissioning. 8

9 Human Rights in homecare Psychological and emotional well-being Protection from bullying and threats Protection from disrespectful treatment Respect for cultural heritage/religion Autonomy and choice Respecting peoples right to live as independently as possible Respecting peoples right to determine the timetable of ones day Respecting peoples right to be offered meaningful choices and time to decide Respect for private life Guaranteeing modesty/dignity in delivery of personal care Respect for peoples wishes to be intimate with others Respect for peoples private correspondence Social and civic participation Right to maintain relationships with family and friends Right to participate in community events 9

10 KEY ISSUES FOR HOMECARE PROVIDERS The LITTLE THINGS matter and make a BIG difference to the level of risk to peoples human rights. Older people need to be given real CHOICE about how and when care is delivered and by whom Its good to talk – users and providers working together with mutual respect really do produce good outcomes The working environment and organisation of homecare has a major and very direct impact on promoting and protecting human rights Important to help people (users and staff) to feel comfortable in the knowledge that it is okay to say if something is wrong and that this helps to improve quality of care 10

11 Timeline Launch - November 10 th 2010 Core evidence gathering Nov 2010 – April 2011 Good practice case studies April – July 2011 Findings and recommendations Dec 2011 For further information, contact us at: or visit our Home Care Inquiry web pages at 11


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