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Terry Ashton, Adviser (Guidance and Careers) Welcome!

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Presentation on theme: "Terry Ashton, Adviser (Guidance and Careers) Welcome!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Terry Ashton, Adviser (Guidance and Careers) Welcome!

2 We dont all learn the same way!

3 We dont all learn the same way!

4 We dont all learn the same way!

5 nextpreviousindexhome why are learning styles important? People who are actively engaged in the learning process will more likely achieve success. A key to getting and keeping learners involved in the learning process is to understand learning style preferences.

6 nextpreviousindexhome models for learning styles Felder–Silverman Learning Model Herrmann Brain-Dominance Model Kolbs Learning-Style Inventory Honey & Mumfords model Barbe-Swassing model Gregorc model of mind styles Myers Briggs Personality Types

7 nextpreviousindexhome Felder–Silverman Learning Model sensing or intuitive learners visual or verbal learners inductive or deductive learners active or reflective learners sequential or global learners

8 nextpreviousindexhome Herrmann Brain-Dominance Model classifies learners in terms of their relative preferences for thinking in four different modes left-brain cerebral (logical thinkers) left-brain limbic (sequential thinkers) right-brain limbic (emotional thinkers) right-brain cerebral (holistic thinkers).

9 nextpreviousindexhome Kolbs Learning-Style Inventory This classifies learners as having a preference for concrete experience or abstract conceptualization active experimentation or reflective observation.

10 nextpreviousindexhome Honey & Mumfords Classification Developed from Kolbs model; learners are activists reflectors pragmatists theorists

11 nextpreviousindexhome How we take in and learn information Visual learn by seeing and watching Auditory learn by listening to verbal instructions Kinesthetic learn by being physically involved Barbe-Swassing Model

12 nextpreviousindexhome Perception - how we take in information –Concrete –Abstract Ordering - how we make sense of and use the information –Sequential –Random Gregorc model of mind styles

13 nextpreviousindexhome Carl Jung Psychological Types 1926

14 nextpreviousindexhome Katherine Briggs & Isabel Briggs Myers developed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

15 nextpreviousindexhome trait theory measure how much of a particular trait or skill an individual has type theory valuable differences between people result different preferences

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17 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process

18 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information

19 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information using information

20 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information using information

21 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised

22 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

23 nextpreviousindexhome getting energised acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

24 nextpreviousindexhome getting motivated/energised extraversion

25 nextpreviousindexhome getting motivated/energised extraversion E

26 nextpreviousindexhome getting motivated/energised extraversion E introversion

27 nextpreviousindexhome getting motivated/energised extraversion E introversion I

28 nextpreviousindexhome getting motivated/energised E - I your energy source what energises you - inner world or outer world direction of focus - sources of energy how you are energised

29 nextpreviousindexhome E I energised by outer world (of people activities, things) energised in inner world (of ideas, emotions, impressions focus on people, thingsfocus on thoughts, concepts activereflective breadth of interestdepth of interest live it, then understand itunderstand it, before live it interactionConcentration

30 nextpreviousindexhome E I outgoinginwardly directed do-think-dothink-do-think prefer talking to writingprefer activity to take place quietly in head need to experience world to understand it, and so tend to like action don't need to experience things to understand them because the concepts and ideas can be worked out in the head talk it outthink it through

31 nextpreviousindexhome E I extend into your environment by reaching out to others defend yourself against your environment by stepping back/avoiding others act first, think laterthink first, act later like variety and actionlike concentration and reflection prefer to talk face-to-faceprefer to use memos, , and other written forms of communication you are frequently not available because youre out and about even though youre present, others see you as difficult to read/remote or hard to know

32 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

33 nextpreviousindexhome acquiring/taking in information acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

34 nextpreviousindexhome acquiring/taking in information sensing

35 nextpreviousindexhome acquiring/taking in information sensingS

36 nextpreviousindexhome acquiring/taking in information sensingS intuitive

37 nextpreviousindexhome acquiring/taking in information sensingS intuitiveN

38 nextpreviousindexhome acquiring/taking in information S - N how you prefer to take in information perceiving preference ways of taking in information what you pay attention to

39 nextpreviousindexhome S N prefer taking in information through the five senses prefer taking in information through the sixth sense and noticing what might be work with known factslook for possibilities and relationships factsmeanings dataassociations

40 nextpreviousindexhome S N detailspossibilities reality-basedhunches, speculations actualitytheoretical here and nowfuture utilityfantasy

41 nextpreviousindexhome S N step-by-stepleap around avoid fabrications and generalities regarding things overlook details, lose focus when things are too spelled out value accuracy and precisionvalue insights and analogies relish the presentanticipate the future let the facts pile up to find the trends let imagination and ideas be their guide want to know the practical applications or results want to know additional uses or possible innovations

42 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

43 nextpreviousindexhome using information acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

44 nextpreviousindexhome using information thinking

45 nextpreviousindexhome using information thinkingT

46 nextpreviousindexhome using information thinkingT feeling

47 nextpreviousindexhome using information thinkingT feelingF

48 nextpreviousindexhome T F base decisions on objective/impersonal analysis and logic base decisions on personal values analysissympathy objectivesubjective logichumane impersonalpersonal

49 nextpreviousindexhome T F critiqueappreciate reasonvalues criteriacircumstances firm but faircompassionate weigh the pros and conssort through your values

50 nextpreviousindexhome T F want to be logicalwant to have a harmonious outcome seek to find the truth, influenced by objective reasoning seek to find the most important, influenced by personal information concern yourself with the underlying principles behind a decision concern yourself with the impact the decision may have on people tend toward scepticism and controversytend towards acceptance and tolerance care that flaws are discovered, sharing them with others in an effort to care for them prefer not to critique others but rather to find an appreciative comment

51 nextpreviousindexhome the environment you prefer acquiring or taking in information using information getting motivated or energised your preferred environment

52 nextpreviousindexhome the environment you prefer judging

53 nextpreviousindexhome the environment you prefer judgingJ

54 nextpreviousindexhome the environment you prefer judgingJ perceiving

55 nextpreviousindexhome the environment you prefer judgingJ perceivingP

56 nextpreviousindexhome J P prefer a planned, decided, ordered and organised way of life prefer a flexible, spontaneous way of life organisedpending settledflexible plannedspontaneous decisivetentative

57 nextpreviousindexhome J P control ones lifelet life happen set goalsundaunted by surprise systematicopen to change plan your work and work your plan solve problems as they arise schedule out your time, setting dates and arrangements leave scheduling options open as long as possible

58 nextpreviousindexhome J P make decisions quickly, putting a stop to seeking new information enjoy considering new information, putting off final decisions find surprises and interruptions an annoyance find surprises or interruptions a welcome distraction want to have things settled in advance want to face a few challenges with spontaneity focus on tasks and timetablesfocus on processes and options

59 nextpreviousindexhome which best applies to you? doing what should be done a high sense of duty an inspiration to others everything has room for improvement ready to try anything once sees much but shares little performing noble service to aid society a love of problem-solving the ultimate realist you only go around once in life giving life an extra squeeze one exciting challenge after another one of lifes administrator host/hostess of the world smooth-talking persuader one of lifes natural leaders

60 nextpreviousindexhome The sixteen personality types ISTJISFJINFJINTJ ISTPISFPINFPINTP ESTPESFPENFPENTP ESTJESFJENFJENTJ

61 nextpreviousindexhome The sixteen personality types ISTJ doing what should be done ISFJ a high sense of duty INFJ an inspiration to others INTJ everything has room for improvement ISTP ready to try anything once ISFP sees much but shares little INFP performing noble service to aid society INTP a love of problem- solving ESTP the ultimate realist ESFP you only go around once in life ENFP giving life an extra squeeze ENTP one exciting challenge after another ESTJ one of lifes administrator ESFJ host/hostess of the world ENFJ smooth-talking persuader ENTJ one of lifes natural leaders

62 nextpreviousindexhome this group % E70I30 S46N54 T43F57 J72P28

63 nextpreviousindexhome this years (last years) group thislastthislast %% E7074I3026 S4649N5451 T4323F5777 J7254P2846

64 nextpreviousindexhome Teachers: %N

65 nextpreviousindexhome this group! (%) ENTJ 11 ENFJ 17 ESFJ 11 ESTJ 9 ENTP 4 ENFP 9 ESFP 7 ESTP 2 INTP 2 INFP 2 ISFPISTP 2 INTJ 7 INFJ 2 ISFJ 9 ISTJ 7

66 nextpreviousindexhome this years (last years) group! (%) ENTJ 11 (3) ENFJ 17 (17) ESFJ 11 (14) ESTJ 9 (0) ENTP 4 (3) ENFP 9 (20) ESFP 7 (14) ESTP 2 (3) INTP 2 (6) INFP 2 (0) ISFPISTP 2 (0) INTJ 0 (7) INFJ 2 (3) ISFJ 9 (9) ISTJ 7 (9)

67 nextpreviousindexhome this group (and the general population %) ENTJ 11 (4) ENFJ 17 (4) ESFJ 11 (14) ESTJ 9 (15) ENTP 4 (5) ENFP 9 (8) ESFP 7 (10) ESTP 2 (7) INTP 2 (4) INFP 2 (4) ISFP 0 (5) ISTP 2 (4) INTJ 0 (3) INFJ 2 (2) ISFJ 9 (7) ISTJ 7 (7)

68 nextpreviousindexhome last years group! (and the general population %) ENTJ 3 (4) ENFJ 17 (4) ESFJ 14 (14) ESTJ 0 (15) ENTP 3 (5) ENFP 20 (8) ESFP 14 (10) ESTP 3 (7) INTP 6 (4) INFP 0 (4) ISFP 0 (5) ISTP 0 (4) INTJ 0 (3) INFJ 3 (2) ISFJ 9 (7) ISTJ 9 (7)

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70 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process S acquiring or taking in information N T using information F E getting motivated or energised I J your preferred environment P

71 nextpreviousindexhome E s prefer being in a group group work; group projects; group brainstorming talking (although they get rather fed up with too much talk from teacher!) talking before doing individual work or individual thinking

72 nextpreviousindexhome E s prefer activities which give a chance to reconsider thoughts or possible answers or solutions relatively short, fast-moving activities/environment trial and error problem-solving (they often succeed when the principles follow the experience, e.g. when using computers, microscopes or doing maths activities)

73 nextpreviousindexhome E s prefer learning by watching someone else do something first (modelling) (eg in science allow extraverts to try or watch an experiment before you explain it) talking to lots of other people when wrestling with a problem action and variety knowing what other people expect of them

74 nextpreviousindexhome E s are relatively easily distracted (eg do not often concentrate best when sitting next to a window)

75 nextpreviousindexhome I s prefer individual activities one-to-one or small group interaction, and may find larger groups difficult lectures more than extraverts not being put on the spot by too many questions which require spontaneous answers time for preparation would be helpful here (introverts are not usually the first to raise their hands)

76 nextpreviousindexhome I s prefer pauses for thinking or reflection after being given a question, task or problem someone else modelling a course of action before they attempt it rehearsing before they speak in front of large group or give oral presentations concentrating on a few tasks at a time

77 nextpreviousindexhome I s prefer taking their time to understand something before they try it to understand the concept before trying an experiment or problem to set their own standards

78 nextpreviousindexhome I s can often cope with (shut out) distractions do not always express enthusiasms immediately (eg for a particular course of action) may need reassurance that it is OK for them not to be extravert

79 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process S acquiring or taking in information N T using information F E getting motivated or energised I J your preferred environment P

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82 nextpreviousindexhome S s prefer to use their eyes, ears and touch to find out what's happening information and facts as well as (vague) ideas and theories (may find abstract concepts difficult or stressful) lectures or programmed learning, but only if they attract attention (straight lectures or lots of teacher talk aren't usually enough audio-visual presentations (rather than just OHP presentations)

83 nextpreviousindexhome S s prefer solving problems through standard methods (so may have difficulty with new problems if this can't be done) skills practice work experience; community service etc hands-on activities; practical work case studies tasks which involve the use of senses (eg touch) and which are definite and measurable

84 nextpreviousindexhome S s prefer using skills they've already learned more than learning new skills practical/concrete examples having precise step-by-step directions/ideas about what they are going to do definite measurable things facts and distrust vague ideas a reference (eg a chapter in a book which they can use as a study guide

85 nextpreviousindexhome S s may be patient with details but impatient when details get complicated may find challenge difficult sometimes find it difficult when INTUITIVE (N) teachers present material from several different perspectives (eg in social subjects)

86 nextpreviousindexhome N s prefer reading and listening activities paying attention to meanings of facts and how they fit together open-ended situations using imagination to come up with possibilities and new ways of doing things solving new problems, particularly those which don't have one particular solution

87 nextpreviousindexhome N s prefer not doing things over and over again - get bored with practice activities and lose interest learning new skills rather than practising those already learned challenge and open-ended, creative activities self-paced learning group discussions which allow imagination

88 nextpreviousindexhome N s prefer role play (particularly if the person also prefers extraversion) having new topics introduced in such a way that it encourages them to look upon them as challenges (but if you give them too many details at first they may feel overwhelmed)

89 nextpreviousindexhome N s may be impatient with details but don't mind complicated situations dislike routine sometimes find it difficult to get down to concrete realities

90 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process S acquiring or taking in information N T using information F E getting motivated or energised I J your preferred environment P

91 nextpreviousindexhome T s prefer deciding things logically lectures if logically structured being treated with justice and fair play tasks/problems with right answers praise for getting things right; they tend to value individual achievement

92 nextpreviousindexhome T s prefer rank-ordering (eg of courses of action) to know where they stand in relation to others and can be devastated by failure feedback – and quickly - on what they've done work to be marked, and feedback given – quickly researching information and debate to be task oriented

93 nextpreviousindexhome T s prefer programmed learning debates problem-solving activities involving collecting, organizing and evaluating data activities which involve research (e.g. library research) and allow them to share results with others

94 nextpreviousindexhome T s sometimes hurt other people's feelings without realising it; they may pay more attention to ideas than to other people's feelings don't necessarily need harmony, and often don't mind conflict so much as other people may enjoy talking with teachers rather than peers

95 nextpreviousindexhome F s prefer to decide according to personal feelings or values pleasing people, even in unimportant things activities involving positive feedback praise for the effort they've put in

96 nextpreviousindexhome F s prefer taking account of other people's feelings more than ideas, and they sometimes ignore the logic harmony and get upset by conflict appreciate being known personally by the teacher knowing they're liked helping others, so may make good peer teachers (but remember prefer does not always equal good at)

97 nextpreviousindexhome F s prefer group discussion and group decision- making and role play particularly if they also have a preference for extraversion

98 nextpreviousindexhome F s may find it difficult to challenge others, even in a small way, because they worry about dealing with the possible (conflict) response have difficulty in accepting criticism, sarcasm, ridicule

99 nextpreviousindexhome the learning process S acquiring or taking in information N T using information F E getting motivated or energised I J your preferred environment P

100 nextpreviousindexhome J s prefer to have a plan, & have things settled in advance highly structured activities with clear deadlines to have clear purposes and instructions things to turn out the way they ought to be to finish one project before they start another, so may like to try out courses of action one at a time

101 nextpreviousindexhome J s prefer to decide things fairly quickly to be right to live by schedules which are not easily changed

102 nextpreviousindexhome J s prefer to be told in advance of any changes in procedures or schedules (e.g. if there is to be a substitute teacher or a change in schedule such as an assembly) and make sure they know for how long to have a course outline so that they know the topics which will be covered during a term/course/year

103 nextpreviousindexhome J s may find it difficult to cope with too many unfinished projects - implications for Standard Grade assignments here?

104 nextpreviousindexhome P s prefer to be flexible & not have plans which are too fixed, so find target setting and action planning rather a problem (Not profiling again, they might say!) flexible tasks which can be approached in different ways unplanned and unexpected happenings

105 nextpreviousindexhome P s prefer to start lots of projects, but have trouble finishing them all (so may like to try out lots of courses of action at once at not complete them properly) to decide things fairly slowly to miss nothing to live by making changes to deal with problems as they arise discussions which do not lead to preconceived conclusions

106 nextpreviousindexhome P s may find games helpful in learning concepts often find sitting at a desk for long periods of time boring, and can distract others by their activity during quiet times if they aren't allowed the chance to move around at some time (remember that PERCEIVING pupils often act spontaneously!)

107 nextpreviousindexhome P s often enjoy long discussions which do not lead to preconceived conclusions may need help in completing assignments on time can sometimes be helped to develop plans for their work by working backwards from deadlines

108 nextpreviousindexhome P s BE CAREFUL… …not to interpret their off-task behaviour as confrontation with the teacher they often just like having fun and enjoying life, and have a good sense of humour which can be harnessed in the classroom

109 nextpreviousindexhome contact details Terry Ashton, Adviser (Guidance and Careers) Website on Guidance/pastoral care/PSE

110 nextpreviousindexhome course materials guidance/downloads

111 nextpreviousindexhome group: temperaments % this group (general population) SP11 (22) SJ35 (44) NT24 (16) NF14 (18)

112 nextpreviousindexhome group: temperaments % this group (general population) SP12 (22) SJ55 (44) NT 9 (16) NF24 (18)

113 nextpreviousindexhome /2005 groups: temperaments general population SP SJ NT24916 NF142418

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115 nextpreviousindexhome index styles: using information styles: your environment learning T Learning preferences F learning preferences contact details styles: being energized styles: acquiring information S learning preferences N learning preferences the learning process description of styles E learning preferences I learning preferences J learning preferences P learning preferences

116 nextpreviousindexhome last years group! (and the general population %) ENTJ 3 (4) ENFJ 17 (4) ESFJ 14 (14) ESTJ 0 (15) ENTP 3 (5) ENFP 20 (8) ESFP 14 (10) ESTP 3 (7) INTP 6 (4) INFP 0 (4) ISFP 0 (5) ISTP 0 (4) INTJ 0 (3) INFJ 3 (2) ISFJ 9 (7) ISTJ 9 (7)

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