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The Early Careers of a Group of Health and Social Care Graduates Rebecca Foster, Jill Macleod Clark and Judy Curson* School of Health Sciences, University.

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Presentation on theme: "The Early Careers of a Group of Health and Social Care Graduates Rebecca Foster, Jill Macleod Clark and Judy Curson* School of Health Sciences, University."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Early Careers of a Group of Health and Social Care Graduates Rebecca Foster, Jill Macleod Clark and Judy Curson* School of Health Sciences, University of Southampton 1. Background The make-up of the health and social care workforce is influenced by the career decisions taken by professionals within that workforce. This poster reports the pilot phase of a longitudinal study exploring the early career pathways of health and social care professionals. A larger scale study, involving 2008 graduates, is currently underway 2. The survey For this pilot study, we followed up a sample of 200 graduates from 10 different health and social care programmes taught at the University of Southampton and the University of Portsmouth. These graduates had provided contact details during their final year of study (either 2006 or 2007). They were sent a questionnaire survey in November 2008. 86 questionnaires were returned and 83 were analysed. Programme N Audiology BSc3 Diagnostic Radiography BSc8 Medicine BM6 Midwifery BMid1 Nursing BN7 Nursing Diploma with Advanced Studies21 Nursing Diploma14 Occupational Therapy BSc6 Pharmacy MPharm3 Physiotherapy BSc8 Podiatry BSc3 Social Work BSc3 3. About the respondents Respondents were typically: Female - 76 (92%) Born in the 1980s - 57 (69%) Living with a spouse or partner - 43 (52%) White British - 77 out of 80 (96%) Respondents had graduated from the following programmes, in either 2006 or 2007: 4. Current employment 78 graduates were working in the profession for which they qualified. Those not doing so comprised two nurses, a doctor, an occupational therapist and a podiatrist. Only 1 of the 5 graduates not working in the profession for which they qualified expected to return to that profession in the future. 40 respondents had remained in one job since graduating. Of the remaining respondents, the number of jobs held since graduating varied according to profession. This is illustrated in the graph below: 5. Future careers Respondents were asked about their career intentions over the next five years: 68 intended to continue working in their current profession, of whom 32 planned to start further study 2 intended to leave their current profession 47 intended to work full time only 11 intended to work abroad 6. Key findings and implications A number of findings emerge from this pilot study of recent health and social care graduates. While we cannot make generalisations based on the small numbers involved here, certain trends are indicated. For additional information please contact: Dr. Rebecca Foster, School of Health Sciences, University of Southampton R.M.Foster@soton.ac.uk *This study is funded by South Central SHA and is being undertaken in collaboration with Judy Curson, NHS Workforce Review Team Most respondents were: Working in the NHS - 69 (89%) In full time employment - 72 (92%) On a permanent contract - 68 (87%) Of those respondents working in the NHS, 11 were in primary healthcare, 57 were in secondary healthcare and 1 was in both. NB Results hereafter refer to the 78 graduates working in the profession for which they qualified All respondents were currently working in Great Britain with one exception, a nurse working in Guernsey. Two respondents had had a period of working abroad since graduating. The following map shows the spread of respondents current places of work: This work is based on data provided with the support of the ESRC and JISC and uses boundary material which is copyright of the Crown, the Post Office and the ED-Line Consortium. Sources: 1991 Census: Digitised Boundary Data (Scotland) and 1991 Census: Digitised Boundary Data (England and Wales). 55 out of 74 respondents had been able to secure their first choice job after graduating. Those unable to do so were: 5 out of 7 physiotherapists 5 out of 12 nurses with a diploma 3 out of 8 diagnostic radiographers 2 out of 5 nurses with a degree 83 respondents 81 in paid employment 78 in the profession for which they graduated 2 not in paid employment 3 not in the profession for which they graduated Respondents reasons for changing jobs were varied and included: promotion; wanting to specialise in a particular area; and needing to change location. Physiotherapy graduates were more likely to have had two or more jobs since graduating than other students. An explanation for this is suggested by the fact that 3 physiotherapists started their post-graduation careers in non- physiotherapy jobs and had to change jobs at least once in order to secure work as a physiotherapist. Among this pilot study sample: The majority were working in their chosen profession 1 to 2 years after graduating. However a small but significant number of graduates, across the professions, had already left or intended to leave. Such attrition has implications for training costs and staffing levels, research into the factors influencing new graduates attrition is needed. Most secured their first choice job after graduating, indicating good availability of jobs to these new graduates. However, there were variations according to profession and certain respondents experienced difficulties. This suggests job shortages for certain graduates with possible implications for recruiting and training. Many had changed jobs since graduating indicating a high level of mobility. Further research is needed to ascertain whether such mobility continues over time and how it impacts the workforce.


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