Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Self-injury and people with learning disabilities Bristol Crisis Service for Women and Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol 2006 – 2009 Funded.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Self-injury and people with learning disabilities Bristol Crisis Service for Women and Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol 2006 – 2009 Funded."— Presentation transcript:

1 Self-injury and people with learning disabilities Bristol Crisis Service for Women and Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol 2006 – 2009 Funded by The Big Lottery Fund

2 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August 2008 The purpose of the research To find out more about the experiences of people with learning disabilities who self- injure, and their carers/supporters To explore in what ways they have been supported by the services and professionals with whom they are involved To identify ideas, and then produce resources, for training and policy development.

3 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August 2008 How we are doing the research Recruitment of people with learning disabilities who self-injure Creative approach to interviews Up to four interview visits Interviews with family members and/or professionals, with consent Grounded theory analysis using MaxQDA

4 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August 2008 Why people with learning disabilities say they self-injure 1. As a way of coping with difficult feelings or particularly strong feelings 2. Being in circumstances that might make a person want to self-injure 3. Wanting to achieve something as a result of the self-injury 4. The lasting impact of past experiences 5. As a way of communicating

5 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August As a way of coping with difficult feelings or particularly strong feelings Feelings most frequently mentioned: angry frustrated sad stressed/wound up confused distressed depressed fed up worried / anxious

6 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August Being in circumstances that might make the person want to self-injure Being bored Too much going on Being over-excited Being bullied Being involved in, or witnessing arguments People talking down to the person with ld Not being able to do what the person wants to Being in a situation where the person feels they are not coping When someone has hurt their feelings When bad things happen to someone else Not liking what was happening at the time

7 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August Wanting to achieve something as a result of the self-injury A release To show how feeling underneath To calm down To blank everything out To control others Wanting someone to care for them/be nice to them To avoid doing something Wanting to sleep Wanting to be noticed Feeling at the time they wanted to kill themselves To show someone else how much theyd hurt and upset them

8 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August The lasting impact of past experiences Childhood issues: abuse neglect Past issues regarding uncertainty: moving house, change of school, moving into new family parent dying Major changes occurring in the present that bring back memories of difficult past experiences

9 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August As a way of communicating When others dont seem to be listening When the person with learning disabilities has difficulty in communicating

10 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August 2008 Final comments We need to view self-injury as a complex and variable form of expression, and to understand its function and meaning from the point of view of the person concerned People with learning disabilities are able to give insightful comments about their self-injury The principles of choice, self-determination and voice are vital

11 Bristol Crisis Service for Women and the Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol, August 2008 Contact Details Pauline Heslop, Senior Research Fellow Norah Fry Research Centre, 3 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX Tel: +44 (0) Lorna Henry, Research Associate Bristol Crisis Service for Women PO Box 654, Bristol, BS99 1XH Tel: +44 (0) Sandra Dowling, Research Associate Norah Fry Research Centre, 3 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX


Download ppt "Self-injury and people with learning disabilities Bristol Crisis Service for Women and Norah Fry Research Centre, University of Bristol 2006 – 2009 Funded."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google