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Elbie Adendorff University of Stellenbosch.

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Presentation on theme: "Elbie Adendorff University of Stellenbosch."— Presentation transcript:

1 Elbie Adendorff University of Stellenbosch

2 Introduction The rationale of the research Needs identification Example of analysis of Robinsons framework Conclusion

3 The position of Afrikaans Constitution of South Africa multilingualism Afrikaans for Specific Purposes Language Policy for Higher Education supports multilingualism promotes use of Afrikaans as a medium of academic teaching and communication access for non-Afrikaans speakers should be accommodated

4 Challenges at the University of Stellenbosch Monolingual/bilingual language medium option of Afrikaans and English Communication needs of students and lecturers for learning Afrikaans for Specific Purposes in the university context Representative dialogues (see task descriptions)

5 Questionnaire and interviews communicative skills in Afrikaans to study effectively at university Common European Framework of References – educational domain Two clusters of language use identified Generic student-student-communication (social interactive) Generic student-lecturer-communication (academic language proficiency)

6 Dialogue 3:Two students talk about what they like about the social life in Stellenbosch and places to go to. They discuss some of the most popular student places to go to and what the pros and cons of each are. They also talk about their prefrences. They futher discuss which are night places and which are day places. Each student names his favourite place and explains why. They talk about nice restaurants and where and when they can eat cheaply. They decide to go to each others' favourite place and also some of the restaurants.

7 Use a communication task (dialogue 3) to identify typical language use situations according to Van Avermaet & Gysens (2009) format Parameters for analyzing task complexity examined Goals set for tasks directed towards social- interactive language learning Finally textual features described schematically

8 Language use situationsLanguage tasks Asking/Understanding a route description Understand/ask questions about how to drive/walk to a destination Answer questions to a person who asks for a route description Understand simple instructions from a person who describes a route Making a reservation at a restaurant / recreational venue Understand/ask questions about the restaurant / recreational venues Understand/ask questions about the menu Express personal requests and wishes Understand instructions about parking facilities Compare restaurants/social places/recreational venues Asks questions/understand restaurants, social places and recreational venues Express personal requests and wishes Answers questions about restaurants, social places and recreational venues Motivates choice of favourite place

9 Skills involved: comprehensive listening and speaking Text genre: dialogue Level of information processing: restructuring level Interlocutor: familiar peer Topic: personal opinion Contextual support: here and now Linguistic features: frequent word list of vocabulary on restaurants and social places; grammar rule on preferences and not (negative form) like "I prefer" or "I like" to "I do not like"; also question and answer construction and instructions.

10 On a descriptive level, the language user can: 1.understand the main thoughts and ideas with regard to information in texts for entertainment and recreational venues. On a restructuring level, the language user can: 2.select relevant information and instructions regarding entertainment and recreational venues in advertisements and commercials. On a evaluating level, the language user can: 3.compare the information, arguments and conclusions as regards entertainment and recreational venues in advertisements and commercials.

11 Vocabulary Words, phrases and expressions are predominantely frequent Grammar Sentences are predominately complex (7, 16, 24). Some sentences are simple (4, 12, 15). The negative form is used; also question and answer format, for example "Which place do you like?" and "I like". Also mainly present tense structure Structure/Coherence/Length Structure is clear and explicit Pronunciation Is clear Tempo Is normal Topic Is about the social aspect of the university life Register Is informal

12 Fundamental claim Utilized for an analysis of the dimensions of cognitive complexity Used same task as above (dialogue 3) Sentences 1-5: introductory phase Sentences 6-43: narrative phase Sentences 44-48: final phase

13 + many elements + reasoning + there and then + planning + prior knowledge + single task 3 LOW PERFORMATIVE AND HIGH DEVELOPMENTAL COMPLEXITY + many elements + reasoning + there and then - planning - prior knowledge - single task 4 HIGH PERFORMATIVE AND HIGH DEVELOPMENTAL COMPLEXITY + few elements + no reasoning + here and now + planning + prior knowledge + single task 1 LOW PERFORMATIVE AND LOW DEVELOPMENTAL COMPLEXITY + few elements + no reasoning + here and now - planning - prior knowledge - single task 2 HIGH PERFORMATIVE AND LOW DEVELOPMENTAL COMPLEXITY

14 Resource-directing features: [+ many elements] [+ reasoning] [+ here and now] Resource-dispersing features: [+ planning time] [+ prior knowledge] [- single task] Syntactic analysis Classification: quadrant 3

15 Dimensions of complexity Simple 1234 Complex 5 planning time (before speaking) single task (route marked, i.e. from hostel to library) prior knowledge (familiar area, i.e. hostel to library) few elements (a small area) ++++-

16 Purpose of analysis: syllabus and course design for Afrikaans as second language within multilingual context of Stellenbosch University Contribute to facilitating and optimizing second language development in Afrikaans Crucial competence base for effective development of discipline-specific receptive and/or productive communication

17 Robinson, P. (2001a). Task complexity, task difficulty, and task production: Exploring interactions in a componential framework. Applied Linguistics 22, Robinson, P. (2001b). Task complexity, cognitive resources, and syllabus design: A triadic framework for investigating task influences on SLA. In P. Robinson (Ed.). Cognition and second language instruction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. P Robinson, P. (2003). The Cognition Hypothesis, task design and adult task- based language learning. Second Language Studies 21(2), Robinson, P. (2005). Cognitive complexity and task sequencing: A review of studies in a Componential Framework for second language task design. International Review of Applied Linguistics 43,1-32. Robinson, P. (2007a). Criteria for classifying and sequencing pedagogic tasks. In: M.P. Garcia Mayo (Ed.). Investigating tasks in formal language learning. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. P.7-27.

18 Robinson, P. (2007b). Task complexity, theory of mind, and intentional reasoning: Effects on speech production, interaction, uptake and perceptions of task difficulty. In: P. Robinson, & R. Gilabert (Eds.). Task complexity, the Cognition Hypothesis and second language instruction. Guest-edited special issue. International Review of Applied Linguistics 45, Berlin: Mouton DeGruyter. Robinson, P. & Gilabert, R. (2007). Task complexity, the Cognition Hypothesis and second language learning and performance. In: P. Robinson, & R. Gilabert (Eds.). Task complexity, the Cognition Hypothesis and second language instruction. Guest-edited special issue. International Review of Applied Linguistics 45, Berlin: Mouton DeGruyter. Van Avermaet, P & Gysen, S From needs to tasks. Language learning needs as task-based approach. In: Van den Branden, K., M. Bygate & J. Morris. Task-Based Language Teaching. A Reader. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamin.


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