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LUMS Strategic Challenges Academic Planning Committee January 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "LUMS Strategic Challenges Academic Planning Committee January 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 LUMS Strategic Challenges Academic Planning Committee January 2010

2 Context Business and Management 1 in 7 of all students in UK Schools study B&M (approx 234,000 FTE) One third all B&M students come from outside the UK B&M academic staff make up only 7% of the sector whilst teaching 14% of the students 12, 000 MBA FTEs are studying in the UK Continued growth in post-Bologna English Language Provision in EU Schools Growth in EQUIS and AACSB accredited Schools globally in China and the Far East: – AACSB now have 579 accredited members (110 outside the US) from 35 countries – EQUIS now accredit 122 schools from 34 countries

3 LUMS 2010 Top 5 in RAE 2008: 75% of our research is at 3*/4* 151 academic staff – of which 29% are from outside the UK 3799 students – 34% of all LUMS (at Lancaster) students are from overseas, excluding EU 600+ students across 4 overseas partnerships Consistently ranked top 5 UK (School ranked 20 th in Europe and MBA ranked 27 th globally by the FT)

4 LUMS 2010 Students (at Lancaster) % HEU/OS by category

5 LUMS 2010 Top 5 in RAE 2008: 75% of our research is at 3*/4* 151 academic staff – of which 29% are from outside the UK 3799 students – 34% of all LUMS (at Lancaster) students are from overseas 600+ students across 4 overseas partnerships Consistently ranked top 5 UK (School ranked 20 th in Europe and MBA ranked 27 th globally by the FT)

6 Sources of Income £26.42 m 2008/09

7 LUMS 2010 income growth

8 2010 – 2015 Projected undergraduate numbers 2311 in 2009 to 3096 by 2014

9 2010 – 2015 Projected pgt numbers 568 in 2009 to 694 by 2014

10 2010 – 2015 Projected pgr numbers 141 (fte) in 2009 to 177 by 2014 * Figures do not include growth associated with Doctoral cluster in Management Science/Maths and Statistics

11 2010 – 2015 Projected collaborative partnership numbers 606 in 2009 to 4407 by 2014 (53% of all LUMS students)

12 Key strategic challenges 2009 – Commit to Sustainable Internationalisation 2.Increase Research Excellence 3.Improve Engagement with Students 4.Enhance Engagement with Staff Our challenge is to operationalise the strategic plan and build upon our reputation and brand. How?

13 Challenge 1: Commitment to sustainable internationalisation During the planning period we aim to: Recruit more high quality OS students on the open market Establish more and sustain existing programme partnerships (1+1, 1+2 etc) Expand existing collaborative partnerships with Goenka, COMSATS, Sunway, Jordan, Singapore Develop new partnerships and enter missing markets (e.g. new site in Bahrain) Further develop international research partners Improve rankings in international league tables & retain our accreditations Further develop our international alumni relations

14 Challenge 1.1: Enhance reputation and esteem Obstacles Ability to retain, attract and develop excellent staff Workload and balance – winning hearts and minds Increased competition (in-country provision in major markets & post-Bologna competition in Europe) Developing overseas collaborations whilst maintaining accreditation and rankings The relative strength of LUMS Brand Our reputation and esteem is derived from the collective efforts of our staff, the quality of our students and alumni, the quality of provision, market penetration and our presence in the global business school community.

15 Challenge 1.1: Enhance reputation and esteem Possible Actions Work with HR to modernise recruitment process in order to be more pro-active and flexible Extend probationary period to 5 years (tenure system?) Consider career route for non-research colleagues Model international staffing (for accreditation requirements) Continue to extend our international research; senior representation on international bodies Increase PR activity and develop our alumni provision Conferences at LUMS Networks in Europe

16 Challenge 1.2: Increase the number of international students at LUMS Obstacles LUMS is building from a significant base in a competitive market – the University target of 50% increase will is stretching, given the current climate Global economy (competition in major markets) Government constraints (eg UK Border Agency) Posting of fees early Quality v quantity (impact on rankings and accreditation) Student expectations of premium fee programmes and facilities Low conversion rates LUMS has established a strong international student base and aims to build on this by increasing numbers from 1086 in 2009 to 1532 by 2014

17 Conversion Rates: Benchmark data % Conversion Rate SchoolMastersMBA A2225 B2131 C3448 D1824 E (LUMS)1234 F3252 G1531 H1922 I2339 Peer group average2234 Peer Group Comprises, Aston, Birmingham, Bradford, Durham, Lancaster (E), Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham and Warwick

18 Challenge 1.2: Increase the number of international students at LUMS Possible Actions Further revisions to recruitment process (PG Applications Project Phase 2: conversion activities, fee setting regime) Increase the attractiveness of our offer (eg international student career support ) Targeted use of scholarships Continue to work with international office on programme partnerships Continue to enhance our facilities Increased use of China Centre (Confucius) and launch India Centre Provision of better management information (systems development) Academic road shows in major markets

19 Challenge 1.3: Implement new off-shore programmes Obstacles Staffing to resource to multiple offshore programmes and sites, including the need to: establish quality control arrangements enhance e-learning & other IT tools (e.g. lecture streaming) ensure student quality & balance the composition of the class provide appropriate staff development (partners and new staff at LUMS) embed partnerships within the School The long established cultural norms and accepted practices Poor communication and learning amongst LUMS colleagues Accreditation requirements LUMS is strongly supportive of delivery of offshore programmes

20 Challenge 1.3: Implement new off-shore programmes Possible Actions Analyse opportunities in Bahrain (KFH), Greece (OTEA), Russia (HSE) Further staff recruitment (e.g. specialist MBA tutors) Invest in e-learning & establish media unit Better integration of partnerships & LUMS programmes Embed QA procedures into School/Partners Staff (partner) development in conjunction with CELT Encourage staff via workload allocation to teach off-site (and review contracts) Explore validations through current networks (e.g. AACSB Vice President for Asia) By 2015 LUMS will have N partners with X students generating Y income???

21 Challenge 2: Increase research excellence During the planning period we aim to: Increase the proportion of 3*- 4* output Substantially increase research income Increase quality and quantity of PGRs and carry out a review of their experience within LUMS GMS Demonstrate research impact whilst maintaining our excellent research culture

22 Challenge 2.1: Increase research income Obstacles Increased competition (more applicants for less money) Protecting and funding research time The balancing act (encouraging staff to improve research outputs v resourcing a broad range of activities/income streams including international collaborations) Lack of incentives Lack of confidence and competence in grant seeking LUMS research income was circa £9.5 million during the last period

23 RAE 2008

24 Challenge 2.1: Increase research income Obstacles Increased competition (more applicants for less money) Protecting and funding research time The balancing act (encouraging staff to improve research outputs v resourcing a broad range of activities/income streams including international collaborations) Lack of incentives Lack of confidence and competence in grant seeking LUMS research income was circa £9.5 million during the last period

25 Challenge 2.1: Increase research income Possible Actions Work with the RES Division to capture and report legitimate non-traditional research income Use the recruitment drive to our best advantage (recruitment of those more likely to attract large funded programmes) New mentoring scheme for early career researchers Clearly link research income targets to PDR (where relevant) Develop incentives to encourage grant seeking behaviours Use AIM Fellows to develop training programmes

26 Challenge 2.2: Demonstrate research impact and embed the new framework Obstacles Inability to obtain and analyse relevant data in business and management Lack of funding and protection of research time given HEFCE cuts Lack of a methodology for detecting impact through teaching (particularly executive education) Attribution problems (ability to link specific impact(s) with specific research outputs) LUMS has contributed to the University and ABS responses to the REF consultation and in anticipating the outcome

27 Challenge 2.2: Demonstrate research impact and embed the new framework Possible Actions Identify relevant case studies (already in progress) Revitalise LUMS working paper series and cases (academic impact) Consider ways to use alumni to create and track impact Continue the momentum generated from our impact seminar series Better utilise our economic impact data on LEAD and LLC

28 Challenge 2.3: Increase high quality PGR student numbers and their experience Obstacles Scholarships and funding (amount and allocation process) Admissions process Economics of PGR training (DTCs may help/review of taught element – a new PhD model!) Demand/distribution across faculty LUMS PhD programme is currently one of the largest in the UK (LUMS 141, WBS 112)

29 Increase Research Excellence

30 Challenge 2.3: Increase high quality PGR student numbers Possible Actions Increase funding for PGR students (agree early in cycle) Review scholarship allocation process Review admissions process for PGR students Improve the quality of the graduate school experience (Deputy Deans review) Successfully bid and then implement the DTC bids Review doctoral programme, especially introduce coursework content and progress hurdles Review placement data for PGRs Expand the prominence of post-doctoral fellows in staffing plans Form strategic doctoral training collaborations (e.g. INTACCT)

31 Challenge 3: Commitment to student engagement During the planning period we aim to: Improve recruitment practices to meet ambitious targets Review and refresh our portfolio to align market demand (e.g. New Industry, New Jobs) with LUMS strengths and capabilities Map the student experience in all its diversity and identify areas for improvement Develop and implement our employability strategy Review student satisfaction data and implementation of action plans Invest in e-learning capability

32 Challenge 3.1: Maintain a high level of satisfaction with teaching and the learning environment Obstacles Failure to recruit the right students Balance between student numbers and student quality (recruiting the best, in the context of increasing competition) Failure to offer a diverse range of student support (e.g. international student support) Failure to respond effectively to student feedback Lack of dedicated high quality facilities for premium fee programmes (in line with competition) Access to management information (e.g. internal and external benchmarking data) Government policy During the planning period we aim to expand our student numbers dramatically

33 Challenge 3.1: Maintain a high level of satisfaction with teaching and the learning environment Possible Actions Implement improvement plans in response to student feedback and internal reviews (NSS etc.) Review the prospective ug and pg communications to improve our recruitment process Support staff development opportunities to provide innovative teaching and learning Continue to enhance our assurance of learning process (AACSB) Continue to utilise our employer contacts to best effect Review international student support in collaboration with Student Based Services Review space and facility requirements post-Waterside Work collaboratively with student representatives

34 Challenge 3.2: Inform priorities through understanding the diversity of needs from all categories of student Obstacles Lack of information about the diversity of student experience and therefore the needs of all categories The challenge of rapid internationalisation and the need to adapt our practices, processes and understanding in line with local cultures (e.g. PG Dip Goenka) Lack of holistic approach to student experience LUMS already has a very diverse student body both at Lancaster and in overseas partner institutions

35 Challenge 3.2: Inform priorities through understanding the diversity of needs from all categories of student Possible Actions To map the student experience in all its diversity and identify areas for improvement Provide increased support in LUMS for international students Continue to invest in and support our e-delivery capability Ensure the integration of LUMS students wherever they are based (communication) Review portfolio (stakeholder advice) Optimise and share innovative teaching practice (Learning and Teaching Forum) Review student representation (work with LUSU)

36 Challenge 3.3: Improve our employability rankings for students Obstacles Employability, Enterprise and Careers resources LU degree structure (embedding above in curriculum) Practical constraints for exchange/ placement students Finding resource to meet growing demand for students project and placement opportunities combined with supportive supervision Understanding the difference between employability and employment and targeting support and resources accordingly Failure to exploit alumni opportunities LUMS has improved its destination figure significantly from 66% in 2003 to 82% in 2007

37 LUMS student destination data

38 Challenge 3.3: Improve our employability rankings for students Obstacles Employability, Enterprise and Careers resources LU degree structure (embedding above in curriculum) Practical constraints for exchange/ placement students Finding resource to meet growing demand for students project and placement opportunities combined with supportive supervision Understanding the difference between employability and employment and targeting support and resources accordingly Failure to exploit alumni opportunities LUMS has improved its destination figure significantly from 66% in 2003 to 82% in 2007

39 Challenge 3.3: Improve our employability rankings for students Possible Actions Implement the outcomes of the employability review Further internationalise the curriculum Maximise opportunities for exchanges, placements and projects Develop and maintain our relationships with employers alumni and international partners to create opportunities Set up a Business Development Unit

40 Challenge 4: Commitment to staff engagement During the planning period we aim to: Carefully resource our sustainable growth plan mindful of the constraints and cutbacks facing the sector Continue to invest in staff recruitment, development and support, to ensure we employ the best and help them to achieve their (and our) potential Work with HR on policy and practice development (e.g. probation, modernising recruitment, PDP) Continue to refer to the Staff Satisfaction Survey and improve our workload planning and communication

41 Challenge 4.1: Retain and attract high quality staff Obstacles Competition (sector scarcity, salary premia and aggressive poaching) Economic downturn (also an opportunity) Perceived workload constraints (protecting research time) Lancaster brand and location Lack of recognition of important team roles within LUMS and comparative advantage of professional colleagues 280 colleagues currently work in LUMS. Our 2010/2011 plan requires us to recruit circa 30 staff in order to fill vacancies and to fulfil our growth plan

42 LUMS staff 2010 LUMS Staff 2009 (by headcount) 151 academic staff (29% from outside the UK) 172 academic staff with research 36 professional staff (admin/technical etc) 72 clerical staff TOTAL STAFF 280 SALARY ENVELOPE 2009/2010 £ million

43 Challenge 4.1: Retain and attract high quality staff Obstacles Competition (sector scarcity, salary premia and aggressive poaching) Economic downturn (also an opportunity) Perceived workload constraints (protecting research time) Lancaster brand and location Lack of recognition of important team roles within LUMS and comparative advantage of professional colleagues 280 colleagues currently work in LUMS. Our 2010/2011 plan requires us to recruit circa 30 staff

44 Challenge 4.1: Retain and attract high quality staff Possible Actions Targeted and more flexible recruitment Enhanced development and mentoring Longer probation and possible move to tenure system Introduce globally recognised academic titles Revitalise Lancaster Futures Instigate the LUMS Communications Project Develop the career and progression routes across the full range of colleagues Engage in high profile external professional activities

45 Challenge 4.2: Increase the number of world- leading researchers Obstacles Shortage of available 4* talent Perceived lack of commitment from UK inc. to management research Portfolio overload v Protection of research time Demography of LUMS professoriate LUMS has the opportunity to increase the % of 4* output in the planned recruitment drive

46 LUMS Professoriate Total number of professors 44, 16 of whom will retire during the planning period

47 Challenge 4.2: Increase the number of world- leading researchers Possible Actions Aggressive headhunting Participate in sector capacity building initiatives (MBD Fellowships) Develop home-grown talent Offer competitive employment package(s) Continue to lobby key policy makers and funders on benefits of management research Further refine workload models (potential for differential research time allocation)

48 Challenge 4.3: Offer modern and flexible working conditions and practices Obstacles Failure to adapt to fast and flexible practices Failure to work collaboratively with HR Failure to modernise employment policies (HR) Lack of performance culture Inadequate planning

49 Challenge 4.3: Offer modern and flexible working conditions and practices Possible Actions Foster a supportive environment that encourages continual professional development Ensure a flexible approach to HR practices Build upon our strong commitment to PDP Further enhance and implement the workload model

50 A challenging strategic plan To succeed WE need to be: Innovative and creative and challenge conventional wisdom Fast and flexible Willing to take calculated risks Mutually supportive THANK YOU!


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