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Deciphering the distinctive geographies of obesity in England Health Surveys Users Meeting Royal Statistical Society Graham Moon July 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Deciphering the distinctive geographies of obesity in England Health Surveys Users Meeting Royal Statistical Society Graham Moon July 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Deciphering the distinctive geographies of obesity in England Health Surveys Users Meeting Royal Statistical Society Graham Moon July 2008

2 Why obesity ? Equivalent to an extra 30 years. Premature mortality – 9 years of life lost Diabetes mellitus, Cerebrovascular disease, Coronary heart disease, Hypertension, Respiratory disease, £ 0.5b cost to NHS; c £ 2b to wider economy Implications for health promotion

3 What about the geography?

4 Richard Elmhirst's mission to "Fat Town" was going well yesterday, as he tempted cautious Bradfordians to nibble scraps of venison on cocktail sticks instead of lunchtime fast food or stodge. "That's a nice strong taste," said Betty Gill, who has watched local school meals swing to and fro between chips and salad during 29 years as a classroom assistant in the city. "I think I'll get some. How long do you fry it for?"

5 England now 23% men, 25% women; more rapid rise than rest of Europe

6 HSfE Data Proportion of Obese Adults: averaged 2000-2002

7 Suggested Obesity Prevalence (%) by Strategic Health Authority. Source: Data from DH (2005)

8 Summary Emotive, contested geographies Survey data limited at sub-regional level Experian – one size fits all. Area types plus BMI Mens Fitness – obesogenic environments

9 Aim To examine the complexities inherent in the geography of obesity in England –Obesity and over-weight –By age-sex-ethnicity –By scale of analysis

10 "The socio-economic state of a large city which suffered industrial decline is an important context," said Mr Hughes. "It's not surprising that the likes of Manchester and Glasgow were up there with us in Men's Health's top 10."

11 Our Work Team: Steve Barnard, Gemma Quarendon, Liz Twigg, Bill Blyth; Universities of Southampton and Portsmouth Sponsor: TNS Available: Social Science & Medicine, 65, 20-31, 2007 ML Synthetic Estimation HSfE 1998 onwards (+ other parts of UK) & TNS data Established BMI definitions Part of wider body of work on MLSE and health needs

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13 VariableLevelCoefficient (Standard Error) ObesityOverweight Intercept-1.517 (0.054)-0.145 (0.040) MaleIndividual-0.110 (0.073)0.600 (0.040) Black0.361 (0.098)0.429 (0.115) Asian0.344 (0.094)0.352 (0.109) Aged 20-29-0.308 (0.080)-0.331 (0.060) Aged 40-490.123 (0.065)0.363 (0.040) Aged 50-590.284 (0.068)0.357 (0.047) Aged 60-690.308 (0.066)0.385 (0.059) Aged 70-79-0.222 (0.100)-0.300 (0.060) % Low Social Grade (NSEC 5,6,7) PSU0.005 (0.002) NA % households with dependent children 0.003 (0.001) % households renting from local authority 0.005 (0.001)0.002 (0.001) % married0.004 (0.001)0.003 (0.001) % high social grade (NSEC 1, 2) NA-0.007 (0.002)

14 Obesity - PCTs Highest Rowley Regis and Tipton Doncaster West Eastern Wakefield Wednesbury and West Bromwich Burntwood, Lichfield and Tamworth Hull 12th

15 Overweight - PCTs Highest East Lincolnshire North Devon East Devon North Norfolk Yorkshire Wolds and Coast

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17 Obesity by Sex Men Burntwood, Lichfield and Tamworth West Cumbria North Warwickshire Cannock Chase Dudley Beacon and Castle Women Central Birmingham Doncaster West Rowley Regis and Tipton Wednesbury and West Bromwich Walsall Excess female obesity in areas with high ethnic populations

18 Obesity by Age

19 Overall

20 Scale I

21 Scale II 25 PCTs feature in the 100 wards with the highest prevalence of obesity Of these the most featured are from: –East Lincolnshire –Rowley Regis and Tipton –West Cumbria –Walsall

22 Obesity Wards Quartiles1 (Top)234 (Bottom) PCTs1 (Top)72.52%19.34%6.49%1.65% 225.22%46.15%23.63%5.00% 37.99%24.29%43.21%24.51% 4 (Bottom)1.66%6.15%20.93%71.26%

23 Conclusions Obesity and overweight are not (completely) in the same places Geographies are consistent by age and sex The evidence points to a high prevalence of obesity in the post- industrial West Midlands Small-area evidence supports this concentration but also points to more rural locations

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