Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Joint Information Systems Committee 15/04/2014 | | Slide 1 Findings Rhona Sharpe, Oxford Brookes University.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Joint Information Systems Committee 15/04/2014 | | Slide 1 Findings Rhona Sharpe, Oxford Brookes University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Joint Information Systems Committee 15/04/2014 | | Slide 1 Findings Rhona Sharpe, Oxford Brookes University

2 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 13 How have we investigated e-learners? Background survey of existing research Sharpe et al 2006Sharpe et al 2006 –Scarcity of studies on learner experience, often about very specific and narrow aspects of learning (e.g. CMC), often discussing observable behaviours rather than intentions, beliefs, feelings Phase 1: two large-scale studies Creanor et al 2006, Conole et al 2006Creanor et al 2006 Conole et al 2006 Phase 2: seven focused studies to investigate specific issues plus support and synthesis (ongoing) BLUPS | e4L | Lead | LexDis PB-LXP | STROLL | Thema

3 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 3 … is pervasive in learners lives

4 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 Key messages 15/04/2014 | slide 4

5 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March /04/2014 | slide 5 Flexibility, reliability, convenience Learners are living complex lives. Learners are positive about VLEs where they provide easy access to everything they need High expectations for robust, visible, ubiquitous services. Time is a constraint, and a persistent worry for disabled learners My favourite piece of technology is my phone, because I record lectures... I am more likely to watch what I have recorded than to log on the [VLE] and to go through the long procedure of finding something… (E4L)

6 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March /04/2014 | slide 6 Personal technology There is high ownership and access to personal technology, but note institutional differences Where access or ownership is lacking, students feel disadvantaged Most students are not sure how to use personal technology to aid study, If we are required to be networked for a computer workshop, for example, there generally arent places you can plug in a laptop with assistive technology in. So, then you are reliant on whatever assistive technologies are available on the network. (LexDis)

7 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March /04/2014 | slide 7 Study habits and strategies New learners are conservative in their study habits and approaches Influenced initially by prior educational experience, and later by their tutors Disabled learners are agile technology users who understand the affordances of technology Learn skills from each other Well firstly if I want to look anything up… I will usually Google it... Then I would fire up MSN… Finally [the VLE] and all the resources the University makes available online. (STROLL)

8 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March /04/2014 | slide 8 Working with others Extensive use of social networking sites – for recreational use Extensive use of peers for support, especially technical support Technologies used to support the process of groupwork Social networking used where they have a cohort identity University I dont really use for people at University, I usually use texting, Facebook or MSN. If theyre on-line, on MSN, I know hopefully theyll respond straightaway. You can get an immediate response with phones and Messenger. (E4L)

9 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March /04/2014 | slide 9 Learner differences There are many differences between learners; which may be due to prior experience, discipline, and context Learners show evidence of maturing, in use of online resources, and organising themselves. Some learners are more digital than others, and there is still a small minority who prefer not to engage with technology

10 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 10 Access Preferences, choices, patterns of use Personalisation Beliefs and expectations Effective e-learners Change and transition Social software Specific learners & contexts Institutional level practices Course level practices Programme Themes

11 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide Issues learners struggle with in transition Little understanding of how they will be expected to study and learn – even after induction Uncertainty and loss of familiar processes Transfer of key processes from paper to computer Wider variety of software, more choice, upgrading Over-confidence in information skills Disabled learners having to master assistive technologies ?clash of knowledge cultures (practice, authority, media)

12 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 12 Ways in which learners mature in their studies Increased use of technology and a broader range of uses –Athens, online databases, journals, library system, podcasts… Increased time spent online, especially on academic sites Introduced to many subject-specific technologies

13 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 13 More ways in which learners mature in their studies More careful and strategic over use of time Improved research and investigation skills Preferences change –mobiles and laptops over desktops, USB sticks over discs, digital over paper-based media… Use of personal and social technologies for learning – e-portfolios, blogs, social bookmarking…

14 Learners Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 Want to know more? 15/04/2014 | slide 14


Download ppt "Joint Information Systems Committee 15/04/2014 | | Slide 1 Findings Rhona Sharpe, Oxford Brookes University."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google