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Joanna Cooksey, Subject Librarian 1. You can work your way through this guide, or use the links below to skip to specific sections. 1. What is referencing?

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Presentation on theme: "Joanna Cooksey, Subject Librarian 1. You can work your way through this guide, or use the links below to skip to specific sections. 1. What is referencing?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Joanna Cooksey, Subject Librarian 1

2 You can work your way through this guide, or use the links below to skip to specific sections. 1. What is referencing? What is referencing? 2. What is plagiarism? What is plagiarism? 3. The 2 elements of referencing. The 2 elements of referencing 4. How to reference using the Brookes Harvard style. How to reference using the Brookes Harvard style 5. How EndNote Web can help with referencing. How EndNote Web can help with referencing 6. What next? How to check and improve your skills. What next? How to check and improve your skills 2

3 Referencing means providing bibliographic details (title, author, date etc) of all the sources you use in your academic work e.g. essay or dissertation. References have to be set out in the style stipulated by your Department i.e. Brookes Harvard. Your references allow anyone reading your work – your tutor! – to see: The range of sources (e.g. books, articles, websites) youve used which your reader can then consult. That the arguments in your work are supported by your reading. That youve properly acknowledged others work. Return to contents 3

4 Failure to reference other peoples work properly can be regarded as a form of plagiarism. More about plagiarism and tips on how to avoid it can be found in our Plagiarism Web guide. Follow the links from this guide to access the PLATO tutorial - an interactive online tutorial on plagiarism and referencing.Plagiarism Web guide You can also view a podcast by Jude Carroll about plagiarism.podcast Return to contents Test your skills: try the PLATO tutorialPLATO tutorial to check your skills in recognising plagiarism and referencing correctly. 4

5 In practice, referencing involves: 1. Keeping a record of each source you use. 2. Referencing in your written work, in the form of in-text citations and a reference list/bibliography 5

6 Get into the habit of recording details of each source you use, when you use it. You may also want to record details of specific sections, such as quotes, key arguments, including the relevant page numbers. For web pages, you need to record the date you viewed them. 6

7 This involves providing bibliographic details of each source you use in the form of: In-text citations A reference list/bibliography These should be set out in the referencing style specified by your Department i.e. Brookes Harvard. 7

8 This is when you refer to a specific source, or use a quotation, in the body of your document. The in-text citations link to your reference list/bibliography at the end of your document. In the Brookes Harvard style, a citation will look something like this: (Heaton-Harris, 2007) 8

9 This is a list of all your sources arranged alphabetically by author. Note that some Departments require 2 lists – a list of all the sources youve cited and a list of all the sources youve used in your research. Other Departments ask you to combine everything into one list. Check with your Department which you need to do. Return to contents 9

10 This contains references to a range of sources: books, newspaper articles, journal articles and Web sites Bauer, K. W. et al. (2009). Socio-environmental, personal and behavioural predictors of fast-food intake among adolescents. Public Health Nutrition 12 (10), pp BBC News (2009). Children 'not exercising enough' [Online]. Retrieved on 13/10/09 from: Heaton-Harris, N (2007) Combating child obesity. London : Emerald Norfolk, A. (2009). Who ate all the pork pies? Put your hand up, Stockton-on-Tees; More than one in three of the North East town's 11-year-olds are overweight or obese, and health officials are employing every tactic they know to reduce the problem. The Times, 11 July pp Pryer, J. A. and Rogers, S. (2009). Dietary patterns among a national sample of British children aged 1(1)/(2)-4(1)/(2) years. Public Health Nutrition 12 (7), pp Wilson, C. (2003). Food kills. New Scientist 180 (2423), pp

11 The Brookes Harvard style sets out how your in-text citations and your reference list/bibliography should look. There are rules on how to reference different kinds of publication e.g. books, book chapters, journal articles, web sites etc. First of all, check any guidelines produced by your Department. These could be in module/student handbooks or on Brookes VirtualBrookes Virtual Next, download a copy of the Library guide Citing your references using the Harvard (author-date) system or pick one up from the Library.Citing your references using the Harvard (author-date) system 11

12 Take a look at the Librarys referencing podcast.Librarys referencing podcast The Librarys Plagiarism Web guide links to the PLATO tutorial - an interactive online tutorial on plagiarism and referencing. You can use this to test your skills in referencing.Plagiarism Web guide The Library guide covers the most common kinds of sources. If you need to reference a type of source which isn't covered in the Library guide, try looking at the following book which is held in the Library: Pears, R. and Shields, G. (2010). Cite them right: the essential guide to referencing and plagiarism. 8 th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.held in the Library Return to contents 12

13 EndNote WebEndNote Web can help with the 2 elements of referencing 1. Keeping a record of each source you use. 2. Referencing in your written work, in the form of in-text citations and a reference list/bibliography EndNote Web is free to all Brookes students and can be accessed from anywhere. To get started, you need to register.register 13

14 EndNote Web allows you to create a single place – known as a library– where you keep details of the sources you use. These sources could be ones youve read, but also ones youd like to investigate. Once youve registered you can start compiling your own library of references. You can type/copy & paste details of your references into your library.type/copy & paste You can also transfer references automatically from various databases and library catalogues into your EndNote Web library.transfer references automatically 14

15 EndNote Web allows you to: Pull an in-text citation straight from your EndNote Web library into your document. Create a reference list/bibliography from references in your EndNote Web library. The citations and reference list/bibliography can be formatted automatically into the style of your choice, e.g. Brookes Harvard. See our guide to using EndNote Web with Wordusing EndNote Web with Word 15

16 Check any guidelines on referencing produced by your Department. These could be in course handbooks or on Brookes VirtualBrookes Virtual Download the Library guide Citing your references using the Harvard (author-date) system. If you need to reference a type of source which isn't covered in the Library guide, try looking at the book Pears, R. and Shields, G. (2010). Cite them right: the essential guide to referencing and plagiarism. 8th ed. which is held in the LibraryCiting your references using the Harvard (author-date) systemheld in the Library Test your skills in referencing and your awareness of plagiarism by using our interactive PLATO tutorial - available via the Librarys Plagiarism Web guide.Plagiarism Web guide View Library podcasts on plagiarism and Getting started with Citing and ReferencingplagiarismGetting started with Citing and Referencing Try EndNote Web which can help with managing your references and putting them into your written work. Its free to all Brookes students and can be accessed from anywhere. Learn more about EndNote Web.Learn more about EndNote Web Need help? Contact your Subject Librarian. The Upgrade Study Advice Service based in Headington Library also offers help with study skills issues including referencing.Subject LibrarianUpgrade Study Advice Service 16


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