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Online assessment scenarios Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Oxford Brookes University.

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1 Online assessment scenarios Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Oxford Brookes University

2 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Learning outcomes Assessment Learning activity Learner Constructive alignment: 3-stage course design 1. What are the desired outcomes? 3. What assessment tasks will tell us if the actual outcomes match those that are intended or desired? 2. What teaching methods require students to behave in ways that are likely to achieve those outcomes?

3 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Course design and assessment Assessment defines what students regard as important, how they spend their time and how they come to see themselves as students and then as graduates If you want to change student learning then change the methods of assessment (Brown, G et al, 1997)

4 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Feedback is the most powerful single influence that makes a difference to student achievement Hattie (1987) - in a comprehensive review of 87 meta-analyses of studies Feedback has extraordinarily large and consistently positive effects on learning compared with other aspects of teaching or other interventions designed to improve learning. Black and Wiliam (1998) - in a comprehensive review of formative assessment (cited in Gibbs & Simpson, 2002)

5 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Scenario 1 It is hard to give meaningful feedback to large groups of students on their essays/assignments An approach to the problem Mechanise the feedback e.g. Word features: autotextWord features e.g. Electronic marking assistant by Philip Denton.

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8 Scenario 2 It is difficult to provide students with sufficient time and feedback on exercises that develop their core skills/competencies Students seem to retain little after lectures It is hard to provide support to students in a targeted way i.e. to those who really need it An approach to the problem Formative computer aided assessment e.g. Publishing, Morris & Walker

9 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Computer aided assessment is definitely a good revision and learning tool. It shows where you are going wrong and teaches you to think for yourself, and also shows you the areas that need more revision. It makes things stick in your head for future reference. (student quote in Morris & Walker, 2006, p.4)

10 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Scenario 3 Large, heterogeneous group with wide variety of backgrounds and entry skills, many international students It is difficult to diagnose learning needs and deliver support An approach to the problem Diagnostic CAA e.g. Business Competencies

11 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Scenario 4 Easy for students to not take part in online activities Participation in online discussions dominated by tutor and a few students An approach to the problem Online peer review and collaboration Explicit assessment criteria for participation e.g. JTCe.g. JTC

12 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development Diversifying assessments In your groups, identify a risk on your course that could be tackled by assessment. Start to develop a way to address the issue. Where necessary nominate members of your group to represent the viewpoints of students, course team, technical staff, administrators and any other relevant stakeholders who are not here today.

13 Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development References Biggs, J. (1999). Teaching for Quality Learning at University. Buckingham, The Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press Brown G, Bull J & Pendlebury M. (1997). Assessing student learning in higher education. London: Routledge Gibbs, G. & Simpson, C. (2002) Conditions under which assessment supports student learning. Learning and Teaching in Higher Education. 1, Morris, L. & Walker, D. (2006) CAA sparks chemical reaction: Integrating CAA into a learning and teaching strategy. Evaluation of the use of the virtual learning environment in higher education across Scotland. QAA Scotland.


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