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Business School www.business.brookes.ac.uk Seminar Series 2011 Assessment and Feedback Using Dialogic Feedback to Engage Students Dr Jill Millar Ms Carole.

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Presentation on theme: "Business School www.business.brookes.ac.uk Seminar Series 2011 Assessment and Feedback Using Dialogic Feedback to Engage Students Dr Jill Millar Ms Carole."— Presentation transcript:

1 Business School Seminar Series 2011 Assessment and Feedback Using Dialogic Feedback to Engage Students Dr Jill Millar Ms Carole Thompson 7 June 2011

2 Business School Overview Outcomes Help participants to examine the role of feedback in the context of their own discipline and institution; Help participants to develop plans and strategies to use dialogic feedback at module and programme level. Programme

3 Business School Dialogic Feedback What is dialogic feedback? a dialogical and two way process that involves co-ordinated teacher student and peer- to- peer interaction as well as active learner engagement (Nicol, 2010, p. 503)

4 Business School Problems and possibilities Please spend the next few minutes identifying up to 3 problems and 3 possibilities that you associate with assessment feedback, and writing them down on the post-it notes supplied. For example you may feel that feedback is a bit of a waste of time (a problem) or that some students love it (a possibility). Please write one problem/possibility per post -it note.

5 Business School Problems and possibilities Student engagement Resources wave goodbye to really serious chunks of time. Feedback as a learning tool Feedback has extraordinarily high and consistently positive effects on learning compared with other aspects of teaching or other interventions designed to improve learning Black and Wiliam (1998) - in a comprehensive review of formative assessment Feedback and the NSS survey Q.9 Feedback on my work has helped me clarify things I did not understand

6 Business School Feedback song!

7 Business School Dialogic pedagogy? Laurillard- conversational framework in which student conceptions, understandings are revealed, debated and re-worked. There is no escape from dialogue (2002, p. 71) Dialectic? Bakhtin –distinction between monologized pedagogical dialogue- ideas or concepts affirmed or repudiated by the authority of the teacher (cited in Matusov, 2004, p. 7) and dialogized pedagogical dialogue confronting and testing diverse ideas, concepts, understandings born between people (cited in Matusov, 2004 p. 7)

8 Business School Feedback within a dialogic pedagogy Develop conceptual understandings Develop an aligned understanding of standards and quality Feedback works because it helps students close the gap between their actual and desired performance in a piece of work (Sadler 1998).

9 Business School Rust, ODonovan and Price 2005 Feedback within dialogic pedagogy 2

10 Business School Dialogic feedback An impoverished and fractured dialogue (Nicol 2010, p. 503). Nicol focus on written feedback: a dialogue with feedback F2F feedback: a dialogue about feedback dialectic and dialogical

11 Business School Dialogic feedback: purpose Needs of learner and needs of assessment Contextual Justify the grade; clarify expectations; transform understandings

12 Business School Dialogic feedback: participation and engagement And engage- HEA funded FDTL Project Engaging students with assessment feedback ( ). Engagement: staff- student openness to F2F dialogue supported engagement AND helped student understanding of feedback, of feedback utility and self efficacy in relation to feedback (reinforcing engagement) Oxford Brookes Business School Face to face feedback initiative ( ) created opportunities for dialogue Facilitation rather than initiation Focus of dialogue: confirmation of understandings; feedback purpose Improved satisfaction Plus: building relationships

13 Business School Dialogic feedback: participation and engagement 2 A lack of opportunities for dialogue reduces participation and engagement? Tariq Lecturers How create opportunities?

14 Business School Opportunities for dialogue Some factors to be considered: Student engagement Staff interaction Clarity over aim of feedback session Other factors…

15 Business School Feedback type Spotting feedback

16 Business School Dialogic feedback- your experiences? a dialogical and two way process that involves co-ordinated teacher student and peer- to- peer interaction as well as active learner engagement (Nicol, 2010, p. 503) Opportunities Purpose Characteristics Engagement

17 Business School Dialogic feedback-our experiences Staff buy-in Scheduling within the module Making it personal Relevance and focus of feedback Organisation Managing expectations

18 Business School Application to a year-long module: Intro. to Business & Management Context Combined Honours module: 'Intro' to Business & Management' Multidisciplinary - some economics, marketing, strategy, operations and so on Large classes (lecture + seminar) An orientation module (first year undergraduates) Wheatley is a satellite campus, so engagement is tough! For UGs, this is a discipline that's not always positively selected

19 Business School Learning development Points in a module where students may require dialogic, transformative feedback Semester 1 Semester 2 Orientation Epistemological Change E.g. Dualism to Relativism (Perry, 1970)

20 Business School Targeting opportunities for dialogue: feedback purpose and resources LowHigh Resources 1 LowHigh Resources 2 LowHigh Resources 3 LowHigh Resources 4 Semester 1Semester 2 Learning & Development Week 4Week 10Week 5Week 12

21 Business School Complex problem; selection and application of theory 45% of module mark Context: Royal Mail; Vince efforts to calm disquiet about privatisation by offering a share ownership scheme to workers A messy issue; no obviously 'right' motivational theory to apply to it The assignment went beyond analysis and was about applying appropriate theory/ies, building arguments, and making recommendations These were 1st year students; we knew they'd find it tough Assignment 3 LowHigh Resources 3

22 Business School Assignment 3 Deconstructing a complex problem, and applying relevant theory/ies... Purpose: Transformational development; epistemological change; 45% of module marks Preparation: Discussed brief and criteria (repetition and dialogue => familiarity with terminology and process) Peer review Feedback (week 7, semester 2): Individual written feedback (including a 'review of reviews');... with some points chosen for 15-min feedback tutorial Continuing with A-grade examples, to illustrate quality 2-week turn-around; 2-4 weeks for F2F feedback tutorial with feed-forward to final assignment which is an exam Engagement with feedback (hand-back in week 9): F2F tutorial focuses on individual points for improvement LowHigh Resources 3

23 Business School Targetting opportunities for dialogue: feedback purpose and resources LowHigh Resources 1 LowHigh Resources 2 LowHigh Resources 3 LowHigh Resources 4 Semester 1Semester 2 Learning & Development Week 4Week 10Week 5Week 12

24 Business School Orientation (Yorke, 2007) Radical movement involving zones of discomfort, threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (Meyer and Land, 2005) Year 1Year 2Year 3 Learning development Points in a programme of study where students require dialogic, transformative feedback

25 Business School Sharing ideas and practices... 1.Could (something like) this structure be adapted for your own modules, and for your discipline? how could it be improved? what might work instead? 2.How do you use props/resources/activities to engage students in conversations about feedback?

26 Business School Bibliography Black, P. and Wiliam, D Assessment and classroom learning, Assessment in Education, Vol. 5, No.1, pp 7-74 Brown, E., and Glover, C. (2006) Refocusing written feedback, in Rust, C. (ed), Improving Student Learning by Assessment, Proceedings of the th International Symposium. Oxford: OCSLD Gibbs, G., and Simpson, C., Does your assessment support your students learning? [online] Centre for Higher Education Practice, Open University. Available from documents/lit-review.pdf [Accessed 4 may 2005]. documents/lit-review.pdf Handley, K., Price, M., and Millar., J. (2008) Engaging students with Assessment Feedback. Final Report for FDTL Project 144/03, Available online at: https://mw.brookes.ac.uk/display/eswaf/Home https://mw.brookes.ac.uk/display/eswaf/Home Laurillard, D. (2002), Rethinking University Teaching: a conversational framework for the effective use of learning technologies, London: Routledge Matusov, E., ( 2004), Bakhtins Dialogic Pedagogy, Journal of Russian and East European Psychology, Vol 42, No. 6. pp Meyer, J, & Land, R., (2005), 'Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (2): Epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning', Higher Education, 49, 3, pp Moore, R., Arnot, M., Beck, J., Daniels. H. (eds), (2006) Knowledge, Power and Educational Reform: applying the sociology of Basil Bernstein, RouledgeFalmer. Nicol, D.(2010), 'From monologue to dialogue: improving written feedback processes in mass higher education', Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35, 5, pp Nicol, D, & Macfarlane-Dick, D 2006, 'Formative assessment and self regulated learning: a model and seven principles of good feedback practice', Studies in Higher Education, 31, 2, pp Rust,C., ODonovan, B., Price,M. (2005), A social constructivist assessment process model: how the research literature shows us this could be best practice. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 30 (3), pp Sadler, D.R.(1998), Formative Assessment: Revisiting the Territory. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice, 5 (1), pp Skidmore, D 2006, 'Pedagogy and dialogue', Cambridge Journal of Education, 36, 4, pp Wankat, P., and Oreovicz, F. 1993, Teaching Engineering, New York; London: McGraw-Hill Wegerif, R. (2008). Dialogic or dialectic? The significance of ontological assumptions in research on educational dialogue. British Educational Research Journal, 34(3), Yorke, M.(2007), The rst-year experience: successes and challenges. Paper prepared for the third seminar in the series on Mass higher education in UK and international contexts, organised by the Centre for Research in Lifelong Learning, Glasgow Caledonian University and others, and held on May. Available from: pdf [22 November 2007].


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