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Steve Sloan Chief Executive – GALVmed The Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicine Protecting Livestock Saving Human Life Glasgow September 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Steve Sloan Chief Executive – GALVmed The Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicine Protecting Livestock Saving Human Life Glasgow September 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Steve Sloan Chief Executive – GALVmed The Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicine Protecting Livestock Saving Human Life Glasgow September 2010

2 Poverty – Livestock- Sustainability:- Some questions Are Poverty and Livestock linked ? Are we moving forward – MDGs? Do we need to change the way we do business? What are the key challenges? What are we doing ?

3 I need Help! My Lurcher thinks it is a lapdog!

4 When livestock is a necessity not a choice Courtesy – The Times

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6 ..and the sensitive issue of Population b under $1a day= 38% b under $1 a day = 26% b under $1 a day = 19% billion billion billion Anti poverty programmes are working but the population is growing and the number of people under $1 a day will remain at or around 1 billion…. And there is very little we can do about it. World population is growing As mortality decreases and longevity increases so populations rise It was true for us, so why would it not be true for the developing world. Stats – Hans Rosling Karolinska Insitute

7 Some Facts Nearly 17% of the world's population live on $1 a day 4 billion on $2 a day 1.02 billion do not have enough to eat Increased since 2006 – food prices and banking knock on 70% of the people in the world's poorest 62 countries are dependent upon livestock There is a direct link between livestock, poverty and sustainability Yet, only 4% (2007) of international aid goes to agriculture in the Developing World... ……….and a tiny % to livestock & fisheries, yet emergency food aid quadrupled since 2000

8 Livestock & Health Under nutrition contributes 53% of the 9.7m children who die in the developing world each year - one every 6 seconds 684,000 child deaths worldwide could be prevented by increasing access to vitamin A and zinc - WFP Annual Report 2007 RETINOL( animal form of vitamin A) found in cheese, eggs, oily fish, and milk Iron deficiency is the most prevalent form of malnutrition world wide and eradicating iron deficiency can -increase productivity by 20% ( WHO) Red meat, fish, poultry lentils all provide essential sources of Iron

9 The issues In the next 20 years the populations of Africa and the Indian subcontinent are set to grow, and the protein gap that is already an issue is set to expand. In the last 40 years, access to animal health services, vaccines and medicines has decreased catastrophically in much of Africa At least 25% of the animals of poor livestock keepers die every year as a result- the true figure is probably significantly higher, zoonotic diseases significantly impact in both mortality and morbidity 1 person in 8 walking this earth is dependent upon livestock for their sustainability.

10 The Challenges country in SSA – Ghana - is on course to meet MDG 1 Targets by Countries in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) are meeting their 10% budget commitment to Agriculture 9 SSA are committing between 5 and 10% 28 less than 5 % Source 6 th CAADP Partnership Platform Meeting Boksburgh RSA April 2010

11 Livestock is challenged

12 Namibia- Cattle Farm Do we truly know the impact of climate change on livestock in the developing world over the next 30 years ? Arguably.....we dont, but we know there will be change and thus challenge for the range of domesticated animals...and thus the way people use them and need to be supported.

13 What can be done ? Improve access to animal protein by better husbandry, more investment, improving genetics ( and farmers are doing this) …and by investing in animal health But if the last is to impact we have to get serious A study of 4 West African countries presented to OIE in Senegal showed that in the informal sector 67% of AH VDMs did not meet QC standards Better in formal sector…..Just 64% did not meet QC standards What are the implications? It is a complex situation, there are no easy solutions Policy, practice, market development...are all needed- No one Organisation can do this alone

14 Just livestock? Of course not, the work of organizations such as AGRA in crops shows that there are a multiplicity of ways of tackling hunger But no source of sustainment is irrelevant So what kind of difference are we trying to make in Animal health?

15 Our Initiative - Protecting Livestock, Saving Human Life Funded in the first instance by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and DFID it began in September PLSHL drives, vaccine diagnostic and medicine interventions relevant to the livestock of poor farmers in Africa and Southern Asia.

16 What is GALVmed? The Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines---A Private Public Partnership Funded internationally, taking research from wherever it is best in the world seeking, where practicable, to produce and deliver from within Africa and South Asia Short term achievable goals, small footprint, driven by sustainability Market driven, establishing value chains Our current operation is in Sub Saharan Africa, South Asia and Peru....

17 Some of our Alliance members and operational partners FAO, OIE, African Union, European Commission, Government of India, State of Haryana Farm Africa, Africare, Vetaid, Land O Lakes,Mercy Corps, BAIF DIFD, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Pfizer, Merial, Intervet, CEVA,Indian Immunological Research.OVI, OBP( RSA), CIRAD, (France) NVI(Ethiopia) Universities of Melbourne, Sokoine,(TZ) Edinburgh,Madras,Pretoria, ILRI,CTTBD,BVI

18 Our Definition of success New vaccines diagnostics and medicines developed, registered and sustainably delivered into the animals of the poorest livestock keepers in the world Transformational change in the way our sector does business leading to sustainable and permanent improvement in access to animal health tools for poor livestock keepers

19 GALVmed Priority diseases Cattle –East Coast Fever –Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia –Hemorrhagic Septicaemia –Trypanosomiasis Sheep and goats –Peste des Petits Ruminants –Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia –Sheep & Goat Pox Pigs –Porcine Cysticercosis –African Swine Fever –Classical Swine Fever Poultry –Newcastle Disease –Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Multi-species –Rift Valley Fever This was our initial thinking – as our geographical focus changes and as our understanding changes we will address our priorities

20 Business focus Objective 1 Develop data driven decision making tools for socio economic impact and understanding of markets Objective 1 Develop data driven decision making tools for socio economic impact and understanding of markets Objective 2 Developing 4 vaccines for 6 animal health diseases critical to poverty reduction Objective 2 Developing 4 vaccines for 6 animal health diseases critical to poverty reduction Objective 3 Addressing Adoption Access Supply, creating value chains, defining sustainability Objective 3 Addressing Adoption Access Supply, creating value chains, defining sustainability Objective 4 Communicate + network at all levels to gain buy in to paradigm change Objective 4 Communicate + network at all levels to gain buy in to paradigm change Protecting Livestock Saving Human Life

21 Challenges to availability of appropriate new products Discovery Research DevelopmentRegistrationProduction Commer- cialisation Sustained delivery Technical challenges. Lack of appropriate product profiles Ill-designed proofs-of- concept Lack of funding for development studies - high risk, high cost. Poorly designed, poorly controlled field trials. Unclear and varied regulatory requirements. Lack of QA/QC. Multiple regulatory authorities. Lack of market pull-through Poor estimates of need or demand Inappropriate pack-sizes Lack of knowledge or education on proper use Few veterinarians and others capable of advising farmers Inconsistent supply Counterfeit products. Lack of patent protection. Poor quality and efficacy. Poor administration No commercial interest Expensive processes No process development

22 Impact thus far East Coast Fever Vaccine – production resumed ( last 1996), commercialisation route agreed, production facilities in Malawi identified, investment beginning - target 1.5m doses per annum Created a Task force and DAP approach Rift Valley Fever Diagnostic in last stages of approval Now working to improve CCPP, CBPP, and PPR Vaccine production ( VACNADA) Preparing a programme for African Animal Trypanosomoses

23 What have we learned ? Data matters Veterinarian advice in value chains is crucial Local Leadership is essential Donor consistency is vital African voices need to be heard in Western Decision making forums Its not all new rocket science...some time it is just about finding existing rockets that work.....orphan technology..and sometimes it is about finding something more suitable than a rocket....appropriate technology

24 Women really matter Both from a practical and a policy perspective women are often at the forefront of sustainable agricultural change in Sub Saharan Africa. Cecilia – Farmer and Teacher - Zambia

25 What can we all do better? Co-ordinate - Global to Local Approaches Insist on appropriate Governance Develop sustainable value chains Do the simple things well Address climate change in a context sensitive way Advocate for livestock, wherever we work and internationally A parochial interest – drive for harmonisation of regulatory affairs.

26 And where do Veterinarians fit? A vaccine on the shelf is useless – administration is vital Vets are in the frontline in the countries in need Developing and training in extension services Working together for a better future, DVSs, Vets, Community Animal health workers and livestock Keepers themselves are the key to health and productivity Both in Government and in private health services.

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28 Self-determination through livestock I was so poor after my husband died that I was almost a beggar……. Today I am confident and earn money daily - I am a community animal health worker. I have 12 goats, several chickens and Ive just bought a donkey to carry water. My children are all at school and I am hoping my eldest boy will become a doctor. I dont need a husband to support me now. Teresa Ndege- Kenyaa

29 Livestock keeping can empower women Before I became a buck keeper, I would never even be acknowledged or invited to a public meeting. Now I am not just invited but even given the opportunity to speak. I have been lifted from the ground to somewhere. Tabitha Maunder, K enya

30 Livestock: a pathway out of desperate poverty I was an orphan left with three brothers and sisters. I was chosen by the community …….to be trained as a community animal health worker. I have managed to pay for my brother to study science at university. I have also got married and paid a dowry. Now I am a community leader and even asked by other NGOs to train farmers MacDonald Munuve, Community Animal Health Worker, Kenya

31 So…how to end? I am not telling you this to be controversial or to upset you During this conference tens of thousands adults and children will have died in the developing world from Food Security related issues....and veterinarians have a unique role to play......in a sense we have a message of hope, like many other initiatives by protecting livestock we can save human lives and help make them more productive.....

32 Thank You! GALVmed is a charity registered in Scotland SCOP39197 & England and Wales Steve Sloan


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