Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Slide 1 DFID on the economic empowerment of women and girls: a policy response IDRC/DFID Expert meeting on womens economic empowerment, labour markets,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 DFID on the economic empowerment of women and girls: a policy response IDRC/DFID Expert meeting on womens economic empowerment, labour markets,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Slide 1 DFID on the economic empowerment of women and girls: a policy response IDRC/DFID Expert meeting on womens economic empowerment, labour markets, entrepreneurship and inclusive growth: towards a research agenda Lindi Hlanze Economic Adviser January 2012

2 Slide 2 DFIDs definition of economic empowerment: Economic empowerment is a process that increases peoples access to and control over economic resources and opportunities including jobs, financial services, property and other productive assets (from which one can generate an income), skills development and market information.

3 Slide 3 Why economic empowerment? Economic empowerment matters for women and girls – contributing to their broader empowerment, agency and voice, and to better welfare outcomes for them, their households and their wider communities. It also matters for economic growth – for example, through its impacts on firm performance, agricultural productivity and generation of tax revenues. There are multiple barriers to accessing resources and opportunities - discriminatory cultural and social norms, de facto implementation of formal or customary laws and regulations, unequal access to resources, knowledge, information, networks and markets, informality and workplace discrimination and exploitation.

4 Slide 4 Economic empowerment of women and girls DFID Business Plan : Recognise the role of women in development and promote gender equality –One of 6 Ministerial priorities, critical to MDGs DFID Strategic Vision for Women and Girls 1.Delay first pregnancy and support safe childbirth; 2.Get economic assets directly to girls and women; 3.Get girls through secondary school; and 4.Prevent violence against girls and women. Women account for 50% of informal employment globallyWorld Development Report 2012

5 Slide 5 Get economic assets directly to girls and women Access to and control of: Financial assets (cash, savings, insurance, remittances etc) Physical assets (land, property, livestock, productive technologies etc) Human, social & natural capital critical & complementary Targets: Improved access to finance for 18 million women Secure access to land for 4.5 million

6 Slide 6 Example interventions:

7 Slide 7 Examples of policy-relevant evidence Systematic reviews of the evidence base e.g. providing girls and young women access to economic assets, in low, middle income and fragile states. Independent evaluations of DFID and other programs e.g. the impact of improved access to water on womens welfare – how do they spend the time saved? Challenge funds e.g. Responsible and Accountable Garments (RAGS) –Market-tested evidence Case study reviews of M4P programmes without a gender lens Evidence-based toolkits e.g. DFIDs Financial Inclusion toolkit and the World Banks Gender Dimensions of Investment Climate Reform Business Diagnostics and Dynamics (BUDDY): World Bank tool which identifies the sources of growth and job creation (data reliant)

8 Slide 8 Women and work: some reactions Need to focus on demand for, more than supply of, labour. Reality around informed choice – what should the timeframe be for this aspiration? Pace of change given social norms? How can we bring about quick but sustainable change? How can we address the care economy? Is measurement and awareness raising enough to bring about change? Is growth of the informal sector an inevitable and permanent trend?

9 Slide 9 Some policy challenges: Process How can researchers engage policy-makers from the outset? How can research findings be best packaged and communicated for policy-makers? –Graded by quality –Policy briefs –Relative value for money of potential interventions (cost versus outcome) What types of evidence (including data) are most accessible and useful? –sex and age-disaggregated data –ownership versus use of productive assets Women account for 60% of the worlds working poor but own less than 10% of the worlds property. ILO and Commission for Legal Empowerment of the Poor

10 Slide 10 Some policy challenges: Content Can we take a life-cycle/age-segmented approach to research on womens economic empowerment? –WDR: Investing in girls is smart. It is central to boosting development, breaking the cycle of inter-generational poverty, and allowing girls, and then women – 50% of the worlds population – to lead better, fairer and more productive lives. Which sectors should we target? Where can we have the most impact and engage women in higher value activity? How can we ensure that getting economic assets to women and girls does no harm? What time and labour saving technologies could most benefit women and girls? How can we most effectively engage men and boys in this agenda?

11 Slide 11 Thank you! Lindi Hlanze Economic Adviser (economic empowerment of women and girls)


Download ppt "Slide 1 DFID on the economic empowerment of women and girls: a policy response IDRC/DFID Expert meeting on womens economic empowerment, labour markets,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google