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Skills development in the study of a world religion Advice and guidance for practitioners 2a – Introductory examples Advice and guidance for practitioners.

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Presentation on theme: "Skills development in the study of a world religion Advice and guidance for practitioners 2a – Introductory examples Advice and guidance for practitioners."— Presentation transcript:

1 Skills development in the study of a world religion Advice and guidance for practitioners 2a – Introductory examples Advice and guidance for practitioners 2a – Introductory examples

2 Introductory examples The following examples are provided as potential approaches to stimulate learners thinking about questions relating to religions and to begin to develop their thinking skills in relation to the study of a world religion. The activities included are designed to support practitioners in considering how best to develop learners skills and build their knowledge and understanding. The examples provided in this section may be of help when introducing the world religion unit and/or introducing specific areas of study within it. They are adaptable and flexible and should be contextualised for use at the appropriate level within centres. Some exemplification of possible answers is provided. This is offered as exemplification within a context. These examples could be adapted for the study of any world religion. For each example provided, practitioners are encouraged to consider how it, or a similar activity, could be applied across different contexts for study within the world religion selected at the appropriate level.

3 Introductory examples It is important for learners to understand the skills they are developing and that it helps learning if they are able to reflect on their own skills development. The development and application of skills, as outlined by both Bloom and McGinlay are crucial for the transformational changes needed to improve the life chances of young people in Scotland. They develop higher order thinking skills, such as creating, evaluating and analysing and are essential Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work. These are briefly outlined at the end of PowerPoint 1 –Introductory Advice and Guidance and in detail in Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/buildingyourcurriculum/policycontext/btc/btc4.asp http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/buildingyourcurriculum/policycontext/btc/btc4.asp The skills identified in the following examples are not those detailed as the assessable skills for National Qualifications in the SQA documentation. Practitioners should refer to the relevant SQA documents to ensure they develop the skills identified by SQA at the appropriate levels.

4 Introductory examples Activities exemplified in these materials, such as fish diagrams allow learners to explore the many possible causes to problems and to trace these back to a likely starting point. This allows learners to quickly visualise the many different causes and effects, as well as offering them different perspectives from which to solve problems. Similarly, zone of relevance diagrams are good for developing thinking and literacy skills as after taking part in an activity, learners will place the works that explain or are associated with the learning in a diagram. Those words that most describe the learning go to the middle, those that are not relevant go to the outside. The skills developed in these activities develop higher order skills. The approaches exemplified demonstrate approaches which place the learner at the centre of the learning experience. This material supports effective learning and teaching in National Qualifications and builds on the skills and knowledge developed from a broad general education. There are lots of places on the internet which give detailed advice and examples of these types of resources, such as: thinking classroom.

5 Remembering: demonstrating the ability to remember previous learning by recalling facts, terms, concepts, ideas and answers. Can I recall my knowledge/learning? Understanding: demonstrating understanding of facts and ideas by organising, comparing, classifying, translating, interpreting, describing, discussing and stating ideas. Can I explain my knowledge/learning? Applying: using and demonstrating knowledge, understanding and information in a new way. Solving problems to new situations; implementing procedures in unfamiliar situations; constructing answers. Can I use my knowledge/learning in a new way or an unfamiliar situation? Analysing: differentiating and distinguishing information into appropriate parts, working out how the parts relate to each other and to the overall setting by comparing, contrasting, matching, classifying, grouping. Can I distinguish aspects of my knowledge/learning? Evaluating: making judgements, considering opinions, defending decisions by assessing, comparing, judging, deciding and/or proposing alternative solutions. Can I justify my decision? Creating:designing, constructing, formulating and/or adapting opinions, theories and/or products. Can I construct/create a viewpoint/theory? Revised Blooms taxonomy

6 McGinlays Skills Path

7 Group or pair discussion – stimulus questions Overview This activity encourages learners to think about questions that may lead to a particular answer and share them with their peers. It has the potential to challenge learners, who may think creatively about possible alternative questions, and encourages thinking about different interpretations and understandings within the support of a peer group. Skills RememberingUnderstandingApplying

8 How it works 1.Learners are given high level, open questions. 2.Learners are encouraged to think of as many answers as possible. 3.Learners then share their answers with their peers. 4.Learners can now discuss, with their peers, the answers they have come up with and justify how they arrived at a particular answer. Group or pair discussion – stimulus questions

9 Questions Is it an essential part of a religion to believe in a god or gods? Give a reason for your answer. Where might belief in a god or gods have come from? Why might followers of religion today believe in a god or gods? Possible Answers Yes, because Ive always been told to do this and my parents would never make something as important as this up! They are just superstitions from a time before science! In times of difficulty many people will seek every possible answer to difficult questions. Group or pair discussion – stimulus questions Example

10 An important practice for many religious people is communicating with God, gods, saints or other religious figures. People engage in this communication on their own, in groups, in silence, through song, at home, before meals or in a holy place. It can be part of an organised required ritual or it can be impromptu. Often this is called prayer or worship. For each of the following statements, learners should discuss whether it matters if the statement is correct. Learners should then give a reason for why they think it matters or not if the statement is correct. Answers should be based on what believers of the religion studied might think. Group or pair discussion – stimulus questions Example

11 Does it matter if....... 1.A person prays to be cured of a serious illness, but they eventually die? 2.A person prays to win the lottery and does win the jackpot? 3.In desperation a person prays to God for help, even though they normally do not consider themselves to be religious? 4.A child prays, but does not really believe in God and only does it because the rest of the family do it too? 5.A person is required by their religion to pray on a daily basis, but they are very busy and usually dont get around to it? 6.A person prays to God every day, but God does not actually exist? Group or pair discussion – stimulus questions Example

12 Fish diagram Overview This activity encourages learners to think about the causes of questions. This offers learners the opportunity to investigate the reasons we have particular questions and offer alternative answers/ approaches. It has the potential to challenge learners, who may think creatively about possible alternative questions, and encourages thinking about different interpretations and understandings. Skills RememberingUnderstandingApplying

13 Fish diagram How it works 1.Learners use the fish diagram to add their reasons in the Reason 1–4 boxes along the fins. 2.They then fill in any additional information about these reasons in the lines leading to the centre, for example you could write fear of death along the fins and then explain why people fear death on the Details lines.

14 Life after death Reason 2 Hope for better Reason 4 Hope of reunion Reason 3 Belief in holy book Reason 1 Fear of death Unknown Separation from loved ones Trust in Gods promises Promise of Heaven Difficulties in current life Hope/promise of peace, prosperity, unity with God Terminal illness Loss of loved ones Fish diagram Why do you think that the idea of life after death is popular in many religions? Example

15 Discussion questions with a report Overview This activity encourages learners to think about questions that may lead to a particular answer, share them with their peers and the and create a report for others to learn from. It has the potential to challenge learners, who may think creatively about possible alternative questions, and encourages thinking about different interpretations and understandings within the support of a peer group with the ultimate focus being on the report. Skills Remembering Understanding Applying Creating

16 How it works 1.Learners are given an imaginary situation which they are asked to offer viewpoints from alternative positions. 2.They are then given a series of leading questions which enable them to develop their viewpoints from simple observations to more high level questioning and hopefully reflective learning. 3.Learners will then produce a draft report for the class. Discussion questions with a report

17 Many religions explain what they see to be the true nature of human life and human nature. A good way to consider what human life is actually like is to imagine what you would say about people if you were abducted by aliens and asked to make a report on the nature of humanity. Consider the following questions, discuss your ideas with a partner/group and use this information to draft a report. Discussion questions with a report Example

18 1.What makes a human life happy and enjoyable? 2.What makes a human life unhappy? 3.What do humans need to survive? 4.What are the best things that humans have done? 5.What are the worst things that humans have done? 6.Draft a report detailing your thoughts on the nature of human life. Discussion questions with a report Example

19 Think, pair, share Overview This activity encourages learners to independently think about questions that may lead to a particular answer and share them with their peers and ultimately to the whole group. It has the potential to challenge learners, who may think creatively about possible alternative questions, and encourages thinking about different interpretations and understandings within the support of a peer and large group. This has the potential to lead to research to develop the learning. Skills Understanding Analysing Evaluating

20 How it works 1.Learners are given a situation which they are asked to consider viewpoints from a variety of positions. 2.They are then given a question to consider, on their own, for a brief period. They then share their thoughts with their pairs. 3.Then they share their answers with the group, which enable them to develop their viewpoints and consider a range of different viewpoints. 4.Learners will then be encouraged to Extend their learning by researching their viewpoints, or alternative viewpoints, at home and bringing the finding back to the group. Think, pair, share

21 (a possible group research activity) Many religions begin with important events that have occurred in their history. These events are often highly important for the religion and its believers, so much so that for many people they believe that the important events really happened. Often these events are supernatural and would in ordinary life be unbelievable. Many people consider that certain people have either been inspired by the divine or were themselves divine and therefore do not follow the natural laws of the universe. Think, pair, share Example

22 Consider the following question, first on your own for 30 seconds, then in pairs for 1 minute and finally share your ideas with the rest of the class. If someone is a believer of the religion you are studying, does the believer have to think that all of the events from the past actually occurred, or can they think some of them are just important stories? Think, pair, share Example

23 In pairs or small groups carry out research (possibly at home) and make a list of some of the major historical events in the religion you are studying. For each religion prepare a statement regarding what you consider to be believable or unbelievable about each of these events and give reasons for your answers. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Think, pair, share: Extending the learning Example

24 Advice and guidance for practitioners 2b - Active skills development Advice and guidance for practitioners 2b - Active skills development Skills development in the study of a world religion

25 Skills development examples For each example a short description is included explaining: how the activity works which skills can be developed. There are suggestions about how these can be applied to the study of a world religion. This section should be used in conjunction with section 1 – Introductory advice and guidance.

26 The development and application of skills, as outlined by both Bloom and McGinlay are crucial for the transformational changes needed to improve the life chances of young people in Scotland. For a revised explanation of the skills development as described by Blooms taxonomy see PowerPoint 1 – Introductory Advice and Guidance Starting from using mindmaps to group things, flash cards to remember, always developing towards analysing, evaluating and creating. These higher order thinking skills, such as creating, evaluating and analysing are essential Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work. This is outlined in Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Workhttp://www.ltscotland.org.uk/buildingyourcurriculum/policycontext/btc/btc 4.asphttp://www.ltscotland.org.uk/buildingyourcurriculum/policycontext/btc/btc 4.asp Also consider sites such as Thinking Classroom which offer many examples of open questioning/ starters/ active thinking activities. Skills development examples

27 Overview This activity encourages learners to think about questions that may lead to a particular answer. It has the potential to challenge learners, who may think creatively about possible alternative questions, and encourages thinking about different interpretations and understandings within a religious context. Skills RememberingUnderstandingApplying Answers for Questions

28 How it works 1.Learners are given the answer to a question of relevance to the topic being explored. Answers may range from purely factual, such as a date, a name or a place, to an emotion or abstract concept. 2.Learners must think of questions that match the answer. 3.Learners are encouraged to think of as many questions as possible that would match the answer. 4.If the answer does not have a straightforward question, learners compare and contrast the questions they have come up with and justify how they arrived at a particular question. Answers for Questions

29 Example Answer: Nibanna Possible questions: What is the ultimate goal for Buddhists? What is difficult to explain unless it has been experienced? What do you achieve if you leave the cycle of samsara? What do you need lots of good kamma to achieve? What causes all kamma to be extinguished? What has an Arhat achieved? Answers for Questions

30 Answer: The story of the fall in Genesis 1–3 Possible questions: How might some Christians explain the existence of sin? How do some Christians explain the existence of natural disasters, droughts and other natural problems? What is one of the issues that Christians disagree on depending on their interpretation of Genesis? What terrible thing was instigated by the actions of the serpent and the actions of Adam and Eve? Why might some Christians claim that all people have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God? Answers for Questions Example

31 Overview This activity encourages learners to think about the direct and second-order consequences of a particular event or action. Learners map these consequences in a visual manner and expand from the central idea. This activity helps learners to understand the idea of indirect consequences and the impact of belief and practice on the lives of followers of a religion. Skills Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Consequence Map

32 How it works 1.Learners write the main event or action in a centre circle in the middle of the page.

33 Meditation Consequence Map Example

34 Consequence Map How it works 1.Learners write the main event or action in a centre circle in the middle of the page. 2.Learners write a direct consequence of the event in a circle which is linked to the main circle by a single line. Learners try to think of as many direct consequences as possible.

35 Less tanha More skilful actions Meditation Consequence Map Example

36 Consequence Map How it works 1.Learners write the main event or action in a centre circle in the middle of the page. 2.Learners write a direct consequence of the event in a circle which is linked to the main circle by a single line. Learners try to think of as many direct consequences as possible. 3.Learners then consider second-order consequences. These are drawn once again in circles and linked to the direct consequences with double lines. Third-order consequences have a triple line, etc.

37 Less tanha Meditation Less suffering More compassion Getting closer to Nibanna More good kamma More skilful actions Consequence Map Example

38 Consequence Map How it works 1.Learners write the main event or action in a centre circle in the middle of the page. 2.Learners write a direct consequence of the event in a circle which is linked to the main circle by a single line. Learners try to think of as many direct consequences as possible. 3.Learners then consider second-order consequences. These are drawn once again in circles and linked to the direct consequences with double lines. Third-order consequences have a triple line, etc. 4.Feedback afterwards could compare and contrast learners consequences as well as lead into deeper exploration of arising issues regarding the likelihood of certain consequences.

39 Plus-Minus-Interesting Overview This method helps learners to examine all sides of an idea, topic or argument. It steers learners away from their initial emotive responses to an issue and encourages them to think about the disadvantages of an idea which they may like very much. Skills Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating

40 Plus-Minus-Interesting How it works 1.Learners use a plus–minus–interesting template to note the plus points of the issue as they see it, followed by the drawbacks and then any interesting points. 2.Learners will hopefully come to understand that ideas which they perceive to be bad can also be interesting, if they lead on to other ideas. 3.A debrief afterwards could compare and contrast learners plus–minus–interesting points, followed by an exploration of any interesting points highlighted. 4.Collaborative paired or group work on this task will engender discussion and greater depth of exploration of the issues.

41 Plus Minus Interesting Four noble truths Provide a guide to stop suffering. Make a connection between suffering and desires. Clear and easy to understand. Seems too pessimistic that life is characterised by suffering. Not all suffering seems to be caused by desire. Desires often make life happy and fulfilling. What would life be like if no-one experienced desires? Plus-Minus-Interesting Example

42 Odd One Out How it works 1.Odd one out is an activity that can be used as a springboard for initial exploration of the topic or as a tool to consolidate knowledge. Learners are encouraged to explore for themselves the similarities and differences between ideas and to foster an understanding relationship between them. Overview Odd one out is an activity that can be used as a springboard for initial exploration of the topic or as a tool to consolidate knowledge. Learners are encouraged to explore for themselves the similarities and differences between ideas and to foster an understanding relationship between them. Skills Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing

43 Odd One Out How it works 1.Learners are given a set of key words, ideas, places, things or people, depending on the learning area and topic. 2.Learners must decide on the odd one out in each grid or list. Often there may be no right or wrong answers and any word might be the odd one out. Learners must, therefore, give a justified and valid response as to why they chose a particular word and the nature of the relationship between the other words on the list. 3.A discussion afterwards might concentrate on how learners made the connections between the words, the processes involved and whether the group work has helped learners to see different connections which they otherwise might not have considered.

44 Possible answers The monk – he is not a symbol of the religion. The Buddha – He is the only one to have achieved enlightenment. The Wheel of Samsara – it is the only one that describes the situation we are all in. Odd One Out Example

45 Collage Overview This activity asks learners to represent their views on an issue or concept in a visual, creative and engaging way. It encourages learners not only to communicate effectively, but also to develop their interpretation skills in considering other peoples work. Skills Understanding ApplyingAnalysing

46 Collage How it works 1.Each group is given a relevant word, idea, issue or concept which they must represent using a range of provided materials. Such materials might include magazines, newspapers, sticky shapes, coloured card and paper, marker pens, scissors, glue and pens. 2.Groups must discuss what their key term/concept means and record how they decide to represent this, with supporting reasons. 3.The practitioner may wish to establish a certain criteria for the collages in order to add a challenge aspect to the activity (this is an opportunity to involve learners in creating success criteria and for practitioners to ensure differentiation is effectively planned into learning so that all learners are fully involved, engaged and challenged).

47 Collage How it works 4.Learners are given a time limit to complete the task. 5.Groups can present their work to others or groups can navigate around the room to consider the work of each group. 6.Each group should discuss and take notes on the work of others. Discussion can then take place about what each group felt the other groups were trying to represent and how they interpreted this.

48 Jesus Son of God A man Saviour Son of a carpenter Resurrected Incarnation Knew fishermen good Example

49 Atonement Jesus - the only way to the Father (John 14:6) Faith without deeds is dead Redemption through Christ the lamb (Gen 22:6–8) (John 1:29) Judgement John 3:16 Is it by grace, through faith? Is the resurrection of Jesus necessary? Example

50 Carousel Overview In this activity learners move around the room in groups to various stations, completing a different task or question at each stage. Learners have a limited time at each station before moving on. Once they move on they are able to review the previous groups work and add their own ideas. Skills Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating

51 Carousel How it works 1.Learners work in groups and are given a pen that the group must use. Each group will have a different colour of pen and will take it with them as they progress through the stations. 2.Learners travel around the room in a set route (eg clockwise). 3.At each station learners must complete the task or answer the question set on a large sheet of paper. Small groups (three to four) are advisable to enable the contribution of all learners. 4.When all groups have completed all tasks the responses to each task or question are examined and differences are highlighted through discussion.

52 Example What does it really mean? Hamartia. Paraptoma Adikia Anomia Missing the mark losing the way not straight lawlessness Losing the way Is this the same as lost? Does this mean you know where youre going? Does it mean you know where you are? Can I get sat nav? Not straight So? Does straight not mean unmoving? Is it not better to be adaptable? Definition: An immoral act considered to be a transgression against divine law (Concise Oxford Dictionary). Like in a sport? Do you train and youre just not good enough? Can you just fluke it? Is it enough just to spectate? Lawlessness Anarchy? Who makes the rules? Who enforces the rules? Are there rewards/punishments?

53 Stimulus questions Overview This activity gives learners responsibility for creating the questions that will be examined and discussed. Learners also have the opportunity to apply their developing knowledge by analysing and evaluating the views of others in response to stimuli and then to propose their own theories. Skills ApplyingAnalysingEvaluatingCreating

54 Stimulus questions Overview In this activity learners move around the room in groups to various stations, completing a different task or question at each stage. Learners have a limited time at each station before moving on. Once they move on they are able to review the previous groups work and add their own ideas. Skills Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating How it works 1.A stimulus is presented to learners. This could take the form of a piece of scriptural text, extract or picture. 2.Learners are asked to think of any question about the stimulus that they are presented with and to contribute this question verbally. The practitioner writes down the questions on a board or flip-chart so that all learners can see them. 3.Learners decide which question they would like to discuss first. 4.Learners discuss their answers to the question selected. 5.There are a number of different ways to develop learners thinking skills during the discussion: learners give at least one reason for every view they have learners say whether they agree or disagree with the last person who spoke and say why learners summarise the views of the last speaker and comment on them.

55 Example Ash Wednesday by Carl Spitzweg Ash Wednesday marks the start of Lent for many Christians. Lent is a season for prayer, fasting and penitence; a time to reflect on past sins and to say sorry for them to prepare for the feast of the resurrection. Why does the painting Ash Wednesday symbolise the time of Lent?

56 Conversion Overview Being able to take information and convert it into another format demonstrates understanding and also develops analytical skills. This activity engages learners with source material from a religion chosen for study. It also provides learners with an opportunity to make a choice about how they want to develop their understanding. Skills ApplyingAnalysingEvaluatingCreating

57 Conversion How it works 1.Learners are presented with a story, theory or idea. 2.Practitioners should ensure that the presented material is explained and that learners have the opportunity to discuss or ask questions about it. 3.Learners are then given options about how they would like to convert the presented information.

58 Groups select a source from any of the following: Isaiah 11:10–12Amos 9:11Hosea 3:5Micah 4:2–4 These sources are used to describe the time when the Messiah (Mashiach in Hebrew) will come and what he will do. Groups Convert your chosen text into a new format, which they will present to the class. Possibilities include: a mind mapa storyboard a play a creative storya diary entry a poema flow diagrama song Groups now: - explain/perform their piece to the whole class. -explain which source they chose and why. - explain the conversion it has gone through. Why they chose present it in this form. What the key elements of the text are and how they have expressed and emphasised these? Example

59 Exchanging Viewpoints Overview This activity can be used to develop learners understanding of different points of view regarding a debatable topic. Not only must they listen to others, but they have to describe the views of other learners. Skills ApplyingAnalysingEvaluatingCreating

60 Exchanging Viewpoints How it works 1.Each learner will need a name tag that can be easily swapped with a partner. 2.A question which provokes debate should be posed to the class. This might be a new topic or one that learners have already studied if using the task for revision. 3.Learners are given a short amount of time to consider their answer to the question and instructed that they will have to describe their view to another learner. 4.A time limit is set during which learners must describe their view and at least one reason why they have this view. Learners exchange their name tags so that they are wearing each others.

61 Exchanging Viewpoints How it works 5.Learners must then find a new partner and instead of describing their own view, they describe the view of the person whose name tag they are wearing. 6.Once the time is up, they again swap name tags, find a new partner and describe the view of the person whose tag they are wearing. 7.This can be done as few or as many times as required depending on the time available. 8.Learners write down as many of the different views as they can remember. 9.After a period of time the learners are asked to place their name tags on a large piece of paper and to express and explain the view of the learner named. The learner named can then add further points of clarification or correct any errors.

62 Is the Incarnation the most important belief for Christians? Example Darren Yes, because its the time when the scriptures were fulfilled. The Bible said it would happen and it did. This is further proof that what is written is all true! Emily Yes, because it was such a special event, angels etc. This would only happen if something truly amazing from God were to take place. Andy Yes, because it means that God came to us, and without God coming to save us there would be no eternal life. Lucy No, there are many more important things Jesus did and said. He taught us about how to live a good life. George No, its just too much with angels. I mean there is no physical evidence of angels, ever! Cara No, the resurrection means much more for Christians. The Resurrection is what Jesus was all about – saving us.

63 Points of View Overview This activity requires learners to consider a scenario, situation or problem from different perspectives without unfairly favouring any one side. It uses creative writing as a way of developing a greater awareness and understanding of difficult issues. Skills ApplyingAnalysingEvaluatingCreating

64 Points of View How it works 1.Learners are given a situation scenario in which there are multiple characters or people who are affected by the situation. 2.It should be made clear that different characters will have different views regarding the issue. 3.Learners identify who the characters are and what views they hold. It can be agreed amongst the whole class what the view of each character is so that comparisons can be made. Alternatively, learners can create characters themselves and the comparison can be based on the beliefs they hold. 4.Learners then write a dialogue or story which incorporates the different characters and their views.

65 Example Christ in front of Pilate by Mihaly von Munkacsy There are many different characters in this painting. Can you identify who they are? Select a character and discuss how you would feel if you were them. What would you be thinking about what was going on? What would you be feeling watching this unfold? How do you think a Christian would feel viewing this?

66 Example Christ in front of Pilate by Mihaly von Munkacsy There are many different characters in this painting. Can you identify who they are? Select a character and discuss how you would feel if you were them. What would you be thinking about what was going on? What would you be feeling watching this unfold? How do you think a Christian would feel viewing this? Pilate, Roman officer Roman guard, keeping the peace Townsfolk, expectant Elders, advisers

67 Priority Pyramid Overview This activity allows learners to consider what points may be most relevant when considering a key question. It asks learners to prioritise ideas and information on the question, and discuss justifications for their choices. Skills ApplyingAnalysingEvaluating

68 How it works 1.Learners are given a set of cards with words, phrases or pictures which relate to a key question. (There should be enough cards to allow learners to build a pyramid.) 2.Alternatively, learners could write down their own ideas on a piece of paper or post-it notes and use them to build their pyramid. 3.It can be helpful for learners to see a card pyramid so they know how to organise their ideas (see next slide). 4.Learners work through the cards (or their own post-it notes), deciding as a group how relevant or important each one is to the key question. The most important factors form the top section of the pyramid, the least important factors go at the bottom. 5.Groups then give feedback on their decisions, justifying their choices. Priority Pyramid

69 Example Christians believe they have a special relationship with God. With this relationship there are responsibilities. Place the cards in the order you think is most important for Christians. Stewardship Friends Family The environment Possessions Personal wealth Self Grace Worship

70 Example Christians believe they have a special relationship with God. With this relationship there are responsibilities. Place the cards in the order you think is most important for Christians. Stewardship Friends Family The environment Possessions Personal wealth Self Grace Worship

71 Zone of Relevance Overview This activity allows learners to consider points that may be relevant or irrelevant when considering a key question. It subsequently asks learners to prioritise ideas and information on the question and discuss justifications for their choices. Skills ApplyingAnalysingEvaluating

72 How it works 1.Learners can work in pairs or groups. 2.Each group is given a set of cards with words, phrases or pictures which relate to the key question. 3.Each group is also given the zone of relevance template with the key question in the centre. Alternatively, each group might draw their own zone of relevance. 4.Learners work through the cards, deciding whether each one is relevant or irrelevant to the key question. 5.If they decide that a card is relevant, they must consider the degree of relevance in relation to the question and place it at an appropriate place within the zone of relevance. 6.Groups then give feedback on their decisions, justifying their choices. Zone of Relevance

73 Example Jesus spoke about the Kingdom of God through parables. One key parable is that of the mustard seed. Place the cards in order of relevance to what Jesus was meaning in this parable about the Kingdom of God, with the most relevant in the middle and moving outwards to not relevant. foodshelter protection food flavouring birds community large shrub place of rest seeds growing

74 Example Jesus spoke about the Kingdom of God through parables. One key parable is that of the mustard seed. Place the cards in order of relevance to what Jesus was meaning in this parable about the Kingdom of God, with the most relevant in the middle and moving outwards to not relevant. food shelter protection food flavouring birds community large shrub place of rest seeds growing

75 Revolving Circles Overview This method builds learner confidence in communication techniques as they engage in short discussions. It also allows learners to consider a wide range of views without holding a whole-class discussion. Learners may, as a result, refine their ideas or opinions on a particular issue. Skills Applying Analysing Evaluating Creating

76 Revolving Circles How it works 1.Learners are divided into two groups. 2.One group forms an inner circle, facing outwards, and the other group forms an outer circle, facing inwards. 3.Learners face a partner in the other circle. 4.Learners are given a topic, question or task that they must answer or discuss. 5.Learners are given the chance to speak to the person facing them for a limited time (approximately 30 seconds to 1 minute). 6.The inner circle then rotates clockwise and the outer circle rotates anticlockwise. 7.The new pair considers the question. 8.The rotation continues until learners have had the opportunity to discuss the question with a wide range of partners. 9.Once the activity has finished, learners can share their ideas and interesting emerging points with the class.

77 Allah? What is Tawhid? What is Risalah? Are humans the pinnacle of creation? How do the Five Pillars impact on the daily life of a Muslim? Creator Boundaries Identity Yes No Oneness Unique Message Messenger Example

78 What If? Overview This activity encourages learners to consider the consequences of various actions. Contemplating a wide range of possibilities and canvassing different opportunities develops a broad perspective in problem solving. Skills Applying Analysing Evaluating Creating

79 What If? How it works 1.Learners (working independently or in small groups) are presented with a scenario. 2.To implement the strategy, they work out a series of What if? statements, such as What if you were told a lie to protect you? 3.Explain to learners that there are no wrong answers, but they should consider what they think the most likely consequences would be. 4.Learners have a limited amount of time to write down what the consequences of the scenario would be. 5.Once the time is up, learners share their answers with the class.

80 ? What if... the Kingdom of God was here for all to see? there was no star at the Incarnation? there was a witness to the Resurrection? we had proof of an afterlife? Example all people loved their neighbours? you had concrete proof about the existence of God?

81 Note-Taking Overview Learners often find it difficult to take useful notes during a lesson. This activity can help them develop knowledge, understand and critical-thinking skills. Skills Understanding ApplyingAnalysing Evaluating

82 How it works 1.Before introducing a new idea in a lesson tell learners to divide a sheet of paper into four equal columns. 2.At the top of each column, they write the words Important facts, New ideas, Questions and Connections (this last one is for anything that relates to prior/other learning in RME, RE, RMPS and other subject areas). 3.During the lesson learners add information to each of the columns. 4.Learners can share what they wrote with others. 5.An extension can be for learners to post their notes online and for the class to view them to help everyone see what each other has learned and to spark discussion over the points raised. Note-Taking

83 Important facts New ideas Questions Connections Example Jesus and the Kingdom of God Jesus spoke about it. Jesus actions said something about it. Jesus was doing more that just telling people what to do, he was showing them how to live. It was about God and His Kingdom. Was Jesus just talking about God when He was speaking about the Kingdom? When will it come or is it here? Ordinary people couldnt openly speak about God. Jesus wanted to talk about God in a way people would understand. He couldnt speak openly about God so He spoke about where God would be. All the time he acted in a way that would be an example to others, more than just telling people how to behave. The Golden rule


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