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Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting.

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Presentation on theme: "Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting."— Presentation transcript:

1 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar

2 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) This exemplar should be read in conjunction with section 1 – Introductory advice and guidance. These examples are adaptable and may help to stimulate further development of approaches to learning and teaching relevant to the context of the reader. None of the presentations included in this support are designed to be used with learners in their current form. The presentations provide advice, guidance and exemplars for practitioners to reflect on in their own planning for learning and teaching. Practitioners should always refer to the relevant SQA documentation when creating materials so as to include material for all relevant skills and knowledge. This exemplar should be read in conjunction with section 1 – Introductory advice and guidance. These examples are adaptable and may help to stimulate further development of approaches to learning and teaching relevant to the context of the reader. None of the presentations included in this support are designed to be used with learners in their current form. The presentations provide advice, guidance and exemplars for practitioners to reflect on in their own planning for learning and teaching. Practitioners should always refer to the relevant SQA documentation when creating materials so as to include material for all relevant skills and knowledge.

3 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) The opening chapters in the Bible contain many important ideas that form key doctrines within Christianity. The following exercises are based around Genesis Chapters 1–3. The first two exercises are designed to provide practitioners with ideas about reinforcing knowledge and understanding of some of the themes of these texts. The other exercises provide ideas to develop higher-order skills. Although they are based around specific Christian themes and texts, the exercises should be adaptable to the study of any world religion. The opening chapters in the Bible contain many important ideas that form key doctrines within Christianity. The following exercises are based around Genesis Chapters 1–3. The first two exercises are designed to provide practitioners with ideas about reinforcing knowledge and understanding of some of the themes of these texts. The other exercises provide ideas to develop higher-order skills. Although they are based around specific Christian themes and texts, the exercises should be adaptable to the study of any world religion.

4 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Stand and deliver

5 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Stand and deliver Key skills developed in this activity: remembering understanding. Stand and deliver Key skills developed in this activity: remembering understanding.

6 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Stand and deliver Instructions Learners should be put into groups of about four and issued with cards containing pieces of information connected with the Genesis story and the Christian belief of the fall. The groups are told to stand up and quickly discuss each card. When the group is confident that they all know the content of the cards they can sit down. When this happens the practitioner can quiz anyone in the group by asking them to stand and deliver. If they cant answer a question on any of the cards then the group must stand up and help teach the information to each other again. Stand and deliver Instructions Learners should be put into groups of about four and issued with cards containing pieces of information connected with the Genesis story and the Christian belief of the fall. The groups are told to stand up and quickly discuss each card. When the group is confident that they all know the content of the cards they can sit down. When this happens the practitioner can quiz anyone in the group by asking them to stand and deliver. If they cant answer a question on any of the cards then the group must stand up and help teach the information to each other again.

7 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) The first account of creation in Genesis portrays God creating the world in 6 days and on the 7th day resting. Being created in the image of God means that humans share some of the same qualities of God, eg humans are creative, can make decisions, can develop deep relationships. Original sin is the idea that all humans born after Adam and Eve are born with a tendency to sin. Sin is passed on through the generations. The consequences of Adam and Eves rebellion from God include: Adam having to work hard to farm the land pain in childbirth death. Adam and Eve were told not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. After the fall, Adam and Eve were not allowed to eat from the tree of life. Stand and deliver activity cards

8 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Card swap

9 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Card swap Key skills developed in this activity: remembering understanding. Card swap Key skills developed in this activity: remembering understanding.

10 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Card swap Instructions Learners are told to stand in a large circle and turn to face a partner. Each person is then given a card with a question to read. The card also contains the answer to the question. In their pairs learners take turns reading the question and attempting to answer it. If they get it wrong the answer is read back to them. They then swap cards and move in the direction they are facing. The process is then repeated. This activity should last long enough for learners to be asked all the questions two or three times. By the end of the exercise the learners should have learned all the pieces of information. Card swap Instructions Learners are told to stand in a large circle and turn to face a partner. Each person is then given a card with a question to read. The card also contains the answer to the question. In their pairs learners take turns reading the question and attempting to answer it. If they get it wrong the answer is read back to them. They then swap cards and move in the direction they are facing. The process is then repeated. This activity should last long enough for learners to be asked all the questions two or three times. By the end of the exercise the learners should have learned all the pieces of information.

11 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Card swap activity cards

12 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings)

13 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Identifying beliefs from sources

14 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Identifying beliefs from sources Key skills developed in this activity: understanding analysing. Identifying beliefs from sources Key skills developed in this activity: understanding analysing.

15 Genesis Chapter 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Identifying beliefs from sources Instructions By reading the text, try to identify key Christian beliefs that have their origins in different parts of Genesis 1–3. Identifying beliefs from sources Instructions By reading the text, try to identify key Christian beliefs that have their origins in different parts of Genesis 1–3.

16 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Genesis source Key Christian belief Gen 1:1 In the beginning God … God is the source of everything that exists Gen 1:4, 10, 12, 18, 21, 25 And God saw that it was good …. Gen 1:26 God said Let us make man in our image.

17 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Genesis source Key Christian belief Gen 1:31 God saw all that he had made, and it was very good … Gen 2 The Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground. Gen 2:18 The Lord God said, It is not good for man to be alone.

18 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Genesis source Key Christian belief Gen 2:25 The man and his wife were both naked, and they felt no shame. Gen 3:1 He said to the woman, Did God really say, You must not eat from any tree in the garden? Gen 3:10 Adam said I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid.

19 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Building the background

20 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Building the background Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying analysing. Building the background Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying analysing.

21 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Building the background Thinking about the nature of the text you are reading is an important first stage in good analysis and evaluation. There are various views about the genre of Genesis. Christian views about this can be categorised into two main groups: 1.Genesis should be read literally. It is historically true. 2.Genesis should be read poetically. It is symbolically true. Learners should be encouraged to recognise that there are different views that exist within Christianity about the nature of Genesis and that these views affect Christian beliefs. Building the background Thinking about the nature of the text you are reading is an important first stage in good analysis and evaluation. There are various views about the genre of Genesis. Christian views about this can be categorised into two main groups: 1.Genesis should be read literally. It is historically true. 2.Genesis should be read poetically. It is symbolically true. Learners should be encouraged to recognise that there are different views that exist within Christianity about the nature of Genesis and that these views affect Christian beliefs.

22 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Building the background – Part A Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying. Building the background – Part A Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying.

23 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Building the background – Part A Instructions View 1: Genesis should be understood as a literal, historical account of the creation of the earth and the first humans. Argument 1: The story forms the beginning of a long historic account from Adam and Eve through to the story of Jacob (Israel) and his 12 sons. – These stories are thought to describe the historical creation of the Israelites. – Some people argue that if we say that Adam and Eve werent real people then we have to say also that other key people from Genesis may not be real either. Learners should find out about three other key people recorded in the rest of the book of Genesis. They should write down at least two facts about them in the space provided, explaining why some people say this shows that Genesis 1–3 should be understood as a historical book. Building the background – Part A Instructions View 1: Genesis should be understood as a literal, historical account of the creation of the earth and the first humans. Argument 1: The story forms the beginning of a long historic account from Adam and Eve through to the story of Jacob (Israel) and his 12 sons. – These stories are thought to describe the historical creation of the Israelites. – Some people argue that if we say that Adam and Eve werent real people then we have to say also that other key people from Genesis may not be real either. Learners should find out about three other key people recorded in the rest of the book of Genesis. They should write down at least two facts about them in the space provided, explaining why some people say this shows that Genesis 1–3 should be understood as a historical book.

24 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Key characters in the book of Genesis Two important facts recorded about them in Genesis Noah Abraham

25 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Key characters in the book of Genesis Two important facts recorded about them in Genesis Jacob Also called Israel Had 12 sons (the 12 tribes of Israel) Joseph

26 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) In the space provided, explain why some people suggest that these characters show that Genesis should be understood as a historical book

27 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Building the background – Part B Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying analysing. Building the background – Part B Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying analysing.

28 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Building the background – Part B Instructions View 1: Genesis should be understood as a literal, historical account of the creation of the earth and the first humans. Argument 2: The story is referred to in the Christian New Testament. – The fact that Jesus refers to Genesis suggests to some Christians that he believed that Adam and Eve were historical people. – The fact that the apostle Paul (a significant contributor to the Christian New Testament) refers to Adam suggests to some Christians that he believed that Adam was a historical figure. Learners should read the following sources carefully. Using what they have read, they can write a short argument about why some Christians believe that Adam must have been a historical figure. Reference to, and discussion of, the sources are important. Building the background – Part B Instructions View 1: Genesis should be understood as a literal, historical account of the creation of the earth and the first humans. Argument 2: The story is referred to in the Christian New Testament. – The fact that Jesus refers to Genesis suggests to some Christians that he believed that Adam and Eve were historical people. – The fact that the apostle Paul (a significant contributor to the Christian New Testament) refers to Adam suggests to some Christians that he believed that Adam was a historical figure. Learners should read the following sources carefully. Using what they have read, they can write a short argument about why some Christians believe that Adam must have been a historical figure. Reference to, and discussion of, the sources are important.

29 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings)

30 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Considering interpretation

31 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) The following activity examines myth in the Bible. Some interpretations of the Bible claim all the Bible is myth, fable or legend while others claim it to be literal and historical. This activity offers the opportunity to explore myth and meaning. What is a myth? Does it mean that it is a story with no fact? Does it mean that there was initially a core of truth? There is also the opportunity for Interdisciplinary learning, especially with English and Drama. As the activity looks at the written sources as a form of poetry each department could share the material and employ the specialist knowledge of each department to offer the learners a holistic learning experience of depth and added value. The following activity examines myth in the Bible. Some interpretations of the Bible claim all the Bible is myth, fable or legend while others claim it to be literal and historical. This activity offers the opportunity to explore myth and meaning. What is a myth? Does it mean that it is a story with no fact? Does it mean that there was initially a core of truth? There is also the opportunity for Interdisciplinary learning, especially with English and Drama. As the activity looks at the written sources as a form of poetry each department could share the material and employ the specialist knowledge of each department to offer the learners a holistic learning experience of depth and added value.

32 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) While this activity seeks to show the similarities between Genesis and poetry, practitioners may choose to compare sources to music, a play or other forms of expressive arts and literature. This would offer further opportunities for Interdisciplinary learning related to textual analysis. Practitioners may consider a wider range of contexts for learning around textual analysis. It may be appropriate to include learning through comparison with fables, myths and stories from a range of sources. While this activity seeks to show the similarities between Genesis and poetry, practitioners may choose to compare sources to music, a play or other forms of expressive arts and literature. This would offer further opportunities for Interdisciplinary learning related to textual analysis. Practitioners may consider a wider range of contexts for learning around textual analysis. It may be appropriate to include learning through comparison with fables, myths and stories from a range of sources.

33 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Considering interpretation – Part A Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying analysing. Considering interpretation – Part A Key skills developed in this activity: understanding applying analysing.

34 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Considering interpretation – Part A Instructions View 2: Genesis should be understood poetically. The text contains some elements that are true but these ideas have been expressed poetically. Argument 1: Genesis Chapter 1 is structured like a poem. Learners should read the famous poem below and compare it to Genesis Chapter 1. Considering interpretation – Part A Instructions View 2: Genesis should be understood poetically. The text contains some elements that are true but these ideas have been expressed poetically. Argument 1: Genesis Chapter 1 is structured like a poem. Learners should read the famous poem below and compare it to Genesis Chapter 1.

35 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Half a league half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred: 'Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns!' he said: Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. 'Forward, the Light Brigade!' Was there a man dismayed? Not though the soldier knew Someone had blundered: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die, Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them Volleyed and thundered; Stormed at with shot and shell, Boldly they rode and well, Into the jaws of Death, Into the mouth of Hell Rode the six hundred.

36 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Flashed all their sabres bare, Flashed as they turned in air Sabring the gunners there, Charging an army, while All the world wondered: Plunged in the battery-smoke Right through the line they broke; Cossack and Russian Reeled from the sabre-stroke, Shattered and sundered. Then they rode back, but not Not the six hundred. Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon behind them Volleyed and thundered; Stormed at with shot and shell, While horse and hero fell, They that had fought so well Came through the jaws of Death, Back from the mouth of Hell, All that was left of them, Left of six hundred. When can their glory fade? O the wild charge they made! All the world wondered. Honour the charge they made! Honour the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred!

37 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Discussion questions for pairs or small groups: 1. There are some aspects of this poem that make it obvious to us that it is a poem. What are they? 2. Read Genesis Chapter 1 carefully and try to identify aspects of it that are similar to Tennysons poem.

38 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Examples of potential answers: 1. There are some aspects of this poem that make it obvious to us that it is a poem. What are they? Clearly defined verses. Repetition of ideas (eg into the valley of death rode the 600). Some rhyming. Metaphorical language (eg jaws of death). 2. Read Genesis Chapter 1 carefully and try to identify aspects of it that are similar to Tennysons poem. Clear repetition of ideas (eg and it was good). The structure appears to be organised into verses (ie days).

39 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Considering interpretation – Part B Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating. Considering interpretation – Part B Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating.

40 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Considering interpretation – Part B Instructions View 2: Genesis should be understood poetically. The text contains some elements that are true but these ideas have been expressed poetically. Argument 2: Genesis Chapters 1–3 is full of symbolic images that should not be understood literally. Some people say that these make it clear to us that Genesis should not be thought of as a historical piece of writing. Learners should read Genesis Chapter 1 again very carefully and try to identify any unusual things that many people say make it clear that it shouldnt be understood literally. Considering interpretation – Part B Instructions View 2: Genesis should be understood poetically. The text contains some elements that are true but these ideas have been expressed poetically. Argument 2: Genesis Chapters 1–3 is full of symbolic images that should not be understood literally. Some people say that these make it clear to us that Genesis should not be thought of as a historical piece of writing. Learners should read Genesis Chapter 1 again very carefully and try to identify any unusual things that many people say make it clear that it shouldnt be understood literally.

41 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Considering interpretation – Part B Think, pair, share 1.Individual learners make a list of unusual things in Genesis Chapters 1–3. 2.They discuss these with a partner, making sure to add more to the list if the partner has identified anything different. 3.The pairs now share the new list with a small group and again add to the list if the others have identified anything different. 4.They now discuss in these groups why some people say it is clear that Genesis Chapters 1–3 should not be understood literally. 5.The group could work together to produce a short explanation on a show-me board and hold it up for peers and the practitioner to see. Considering interpretation – Part B Think, pair, share 1.Individual learners make a list of unusual things in Genesis Chapters 1–3. 2.They discuss these with a partner, making sure to add more to the list if the partner has identified anything different. 3.The pairs now share the new list with a small group and again add to the list if the others have identified anything different. 4.They now discuss in these groups why some people say it is clear that Genesis Chapters 1–3 should not be understood literally. 5.The group could work together to produce a short explanation on a show-me board and hold it up for peers and the practitioner to see.

42 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Artistic interpretation

43 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Artistic interpretation Key skills developed in this activity: remembering understanding applying analysing evaluating. Artistic interpretation Key skills developed in this activity: remembering understanding applying analysing evaluating.

44 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Artistic interpretation Religious art has been used throughout Christian history to express the beliefs of the Church. Examples of this work can be used to help learners engage in the interpretation of Genesis and other texts. They are also useful for helping learners to develop their ability to think about the symbolic nature of language. The story of Adam and Eve is rich in religious art, having inspired many great works. Some of these pieces are very controversial because they seem to imply that the woman (Eve) was really the one who brought sin and suffering into the world. They give the impression that the man was tricked by the woman and so was less guilty than she was. Other works of art give a different interpretation of the text. Some examples are provided on the following slides, along with some example stimulus questions and activities for learners. Artistic interpretation Religious art has been used throughout Christian history to express the beliefs of the Church. Examples of this work can be used to help learners engage in the interpretation of Genesis and other texts. They are also useful for helping learners to develop their ability to think about the symbolic nature of language. The story of Adam and Eve is rich in religious art, having inspired many great works. Some of these pieces are very controversial because they seem to imply that the woman (Eve) was really the one who brought sin and suffering into the world. They give the impression that the man was tricked by the woman and so was less guilty than she was. Other works of art give a different interpretation of the text. Some examples are provided on the following slides, along with some example stimulus questions and activities for learners.

45 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Lucas Cranach (1526)

46 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Michelangelo (1512)

47 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Consider these works of art. Working with a partner or small group make a list of things in these paintings that give the impression that Eve was more to blame for the fall than Adam. Read Genesis Chapter 3. Describe the aspect of the story of the fall that is being depicted in each painting. Try to refer to the original story as well as describing the painting.

48 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Look now at these other paintings. They seem to give the impression that Adam was equally guilty. Oliver Ray (present day) © Oliver Ray, Raphael (1526)

49 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Masaccio (15th century) Look at works of art on the last slide and on this slide carefully. Working with a partner or small group make a list of things in these paintings that give a different impression of the story of the fall from the first paintings you looked at. Read the original story of the fall (Genesis Chapter 3). Do any of these paintings give a fair impression of the original meaning of the story?

50 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Using the web, try to find out about one of any of the paintings you have looked at. Think about … Who was the artist and what were his reasons for producing this painting? What was happening in the world at the time? Does the painting reflect attitudes present in the world at the time and does it give a fair account of the original story?

51 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Points of View

52 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Points of View Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating evaluating. Points of View Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating evaluating.

53 Points of View Religious art has been used throughout Christian history to express the beliefs of the Church. Examples of this work can be used to help learners understand the beliefs of a faith community. The story of Adam and Eve is rich in religious art, having inspired many great works. This activity focuses on one of these paintings, Fall by Johan Rudolph Thiele. While many of the paintings of the Fall try to make sense of the events this painting tries to tell the whole story of the Human Condition from Fall to Salvation and the means by which that Salvation comes. Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings)

54 Points of View Using the painting, Fall, learners should be clear that each different character has a different view regarding the issue. Learners identify who the characters are and what views they hold. It can be agreed amongst the whole class what the view of each character is so that comparisons can be made. Alternatively, learners can create characters themselves and the comparison can be based on the beliefs they hold. Finally, Learners may write a dialogue or story which incorporates the different characters and their views. Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings)

55 Jesus The cross Adam Animals (created beings) Eve The snake The tree The apple

56 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) JesusThe cross Adam Animals (created beings) Eve The snake The tree The apple What does it say about how Christians see the world? What does it suggest about whether God creates humanity different from the rest of the animals? Is it significant that the snake is separate as well? Do Christians today see the same significance? Is it coincidental for Christians that they believe the fall came from a fruit from a tree and that Salvation comes from a man dying on a cross of wood?

57 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Zone of Relevance

58 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Zone of Relevance Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating. Zone of Relevance Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating.

59 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Evaluation trading This activity allows learners to consider points that may be relevant or irrelevant when considering a key question. It subsequently asks learners to prioritise ideas and information on the question and discuss justifications for their choices. Instructions 1.Learners can work in pairs or groups. 2.Each group is given a set of cards with words, phrases or pictures which relate to the key question. 3.Each group is also given the zone of relevance template with the key question in the centre. Alternatively, each group might draw their own zone of relevance. 4.Learners work through the cards, deciding whether each one is relevant or irrelevant to the key question. 5.If they decide that a card is relevant, they must consider the degree of relevance in relation to the question and place it at an appropriate place within the zone of relevance. 6.Groups then give feedback on their decisions, justifying their choices. Evaluation trading This activity allows learners to consider points that may be relevant or irrelevant when considering a key question. It subsequently asks learners to prioritise ideas and information on the question and discuss justifications for their choices. Instructions 1.Learners can work in pairs or groups. 2.Each group is given a set of cards with words, phrases or pictures which relate to the key question. 3.Each group is also given the zone of relevance template with the key question in the centre. Alternatively, each group might draw their own zone of relevance. 4.Learners work through the cards, deciding whether each one is relevant or irrelevant to the key question. 5.If they decide that a card is relevant, they must consider the degree of relevance in relation to the question and place it at an appropriate place within the zone of relevance. 6.Groups then give feedback on their decisions, justifying their choices.

60 The account of the Fall found in Genesis 1-3, describes the Creation culminating with humanity. Humans are seen as having been created in the image of God. The text continues with an account of the Fall. In the account Adam and Eve turn from God. Many Christians today take comfort and guidance from the Bible. How relevant to the Christians of today are the accounts in Genesis? Using the cards place, what you think are most important for Christians today in the middle and the least important to the outside. Be prepared to explain your decisions. Pain and suffering paradise Created Good shame symbolic Free will snake Tree of knowledge banished choice

61 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Evaluation trading

62 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Evaluation trading Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating. Evaluation trading Key skills developed in this activity: applying analysing evaluating.

63 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Evaluation trading Instructions In small groups, learners discuss possible evaluative responses to questions relating to the text being studied, eg what are the benefits and disadvantages of belief in original sin? The group challenge is to find four benefits and four disadvantages of the particular evaluative question they are considering. Once the group has agreed at least one suitable answer for each they should write their responses onto show-me boards. Once the practitioner is satisfied that each group has a suitable evaluative response, which can be explained if asked, then a selected member of the group should try to trade their response with another group. This process should be repeated until the group has collated four benefits and four disadvantages of the Christian belief. The practitioner and/or learners should now question groups as to what their responses mean, which they feel are the strongest and why they feel that. Evaluation trading Instructions In small groups, learners discuss possible evaluative responses to questions relating to the text being studied, eg what are the benefits and disadvantages of belief in original sin? The group challenge is to find four benefits and four disadvantages of the particular evaluative question they are considering. Once the group has agreed at least one suitable answer for each they should write their responses onto show-me boards. Once the practitioner is satisfied that each group has a suitable evaluative response, which can be explained if asked, then a selected member of the group should try to trade their response with another group. This process should be repeated until the group has collated four benefits and four disadvantages of the Christian belief. The practitioner and/or learners should now question groups as to what their responses mean, which they feel are the strongest and why they feel that.

64 Skills development in the study of a world religion Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Interpreting sources Genesis Chapters 1–3 Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings Christianity exemplar Activity: Evaluation placemat

65 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Evaluation placemat Key skills developed in this activity: analysing evaluating creating. Evaluation placemat Key skills developed in this activity: analysing evaluating creating.

66 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Evaluation placemat Instructions This activity is designed to encourage a collaborative development of evaluative responses to a particular question. In groups of four each learner must write their own evaluative responses to the question in the space provided. The group should then discuss each contribution and decide on the best ones to be included in the centre of the placemat. Examples of possible evaluative questions are: – What are the advantages of the doctrine of original sin to the Christian? – What are the disadvantages of belief in the story of Adam and Eve? Evaluation placemat Instructions This activity is designed to encourage a collaborative development of evaluative responses to a particular question. In groups of four each learner must write their own evaluative responses to the question in the space provided. The group should then discuss each contribution and decide on the best ones to be included in the centre of the placemat. Examples of possible evaluative questions are: – What are the advantages of the doctrine of original sin to the Christian? – What are the disadvantages of belief in the story of Adam and Eve?

67 Genesis Chapters 1–3 (Christian belief: the fallen nature of human beings) Evaluation placemat


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