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Important Please note that the Safety Passport should only be used as an introduction to the Health and Safety processes and procedures that are currently.

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Presentation on theme: "Important Please note that the Safety Passport should only be used as an introduction to the Health and Safety processes and procedures that are currently."— Presentation transcript:

1 Important Please note that the Safety Passport should only be used as an introduction to the Health and Safety processes and procedures that are currently in place within the Robert Gordon University. Staff and Students must also complete all relevant laboratory induction programmes within each School.

2 R.G.U. Buildings 3/1 R.G.U. Buildings

3 Site Map The Robert Gordon University campus is split over several sites across Aberdeen R.G.U. Buildings 3/2 R.G.U. Buildings

4 Faculty of Science and Technology Schoolhill Site School of Engineering St. Andrew Street Site School of Applied Sciences School of Computing and Maths R.G.U. Buildings 3/3 R.G.U. Buildings

5 University Sites Faculty of Management, GarthdeeFaculty of Design, Garthdee Faculty of Health and Social Care, Kepplestone Faculty of Health and Social Care, Hilton Faculty of Health and Social Care, Woolmanhill R.G.U. Buildings 3/4 R.G.U. Buildings

6 As you have seen there is a wide variation in the style of buildings used by the University. This in its self causes problems for health and safety. If you have to attend classes or laboratory sessions at different sites it is imperative that you familiarise yourself with the building layout. When you attend classes, in whichever building, you will be given instructions as to the evacuation route from that particular area in the event of a fire or someother emergency. Throughout the University signaage is standard R.G.U. Buildings 3/5 R.G.U. Buildings You must show your Student ID pass before being allowed entry to any R.G.U. building.

7 Welfare Facilities Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 3/6 Welfare Facilities

8 The University has a duty to provide adequate welfare facilities for Staff and Students. Welfare facilities includes: Rest areas Canteen facilities Staff Common Rooms Student Common Rooms Designated smoking areas Toilets and washing facilities 3/7 Welfare Facilities Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

9 Welfare Facilities The variation in site buildings again has a bearing in what is provided for Staff and Students on the R.G.U. campus. The newer buildings have custom built and up to date welfare facilities whereas the older buildings tend to have rest rooms etc. converted from rooms which originally had a totally different usage. Again it is important that you make yourself aware of the whereabouts of such facilities within a building The University has a duty to ensure these facilities are kept clean and well maintained. Where washing facilities are provided hot and cold water must be available. 3/8 Welfare Facilities Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

10 Welfare Facilities Faculty of Management, Garthdee Site Student Canteen St. Andrew Street Student Common Room 3/9 Welfare Facilities Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

11 Welfare Facilities Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 3/10 Welfare Facilities Student Lockers Student Study Areas Open Access Computer Rooms Noticeboards All of these can be thought of as Welfare Facilities and as such should be properly maintained and looked after.

12 Good Housekeeping 3/11 Good Housekeeping Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

13 Good Housekeeping The University has a duty to consider the health and safety of the workplace environment. People must have enough space to work - overcrowding can lead to high stress levels. Housekeeping All premises should be kept tidy. Equipment should be put away after use Waste, such as packaging, must not be left lying around. All emergency exits must be kept clear. 3/12 Good Housekeeping Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

14 Good Housekeeping Floors and Corridors Floors and gangways must be kept in good repair. Uneven or damaged floor covering is a tripping hazard. Corridors must be kept free of obstructions and must be well lit. Stairways Stairways must be well maintained and fitted with handrails. Work areas Staff and students must endeavour to keep their work areas tidy and manageable. Research areas in particular need to be kept up to the required standard and not give the appearance a Heath-Robinson working environment. 3/13 Good Housekeeping Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

15 Each School within each Faculty, each central administration facility, each Customer Services unit, each Student Support Unit must be seen to be doing as much as is reasonably practicable to ensure that a safe and healthy working environment is provided for both Staff and Students. This is seen not only as providing adequate heating, lighting and ventilation but also adequate space, which is free from clutter, to work in. Access to work areas, as well as defined evacuation routes, must also be free of obstruction. Good Housekeeping Summary 3/14 Good Housekeeping Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

16 Signage 3/15 Signage

17 What is a safety sign? - a sign providing information or instruction about safety or heath in the workplace The University is obliged to ensure the proper use of signage under the: Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regs Signage 3/16 Signage The University has a duty to select and make proper use of and maintain safety signs.

18 Information given: PROHIBITION - a sign prohibiting behaviour likely to increase or cause danger. WARNING - a sign warning of a hazard or danger. MANDATORY - a sign prescribing specific behaviour. EMERGENCY ESCAPE - a sign giving information on / FIRST AID emergency exits, first-aid and welfare facilities. Others include: Illuminated signs Acoustic Signals Verbal Communication Hand Signals Fire Safety Signs. Each of these covered by specific regs. and protocols 3/17 Signage

19 3/18 Signage In the regulations certain colours have specific meanings: Red Yellow or Amber Blue Green Prohibition Danger alarm Warning Mandatory Emergency escape First -aid Dangerous behaviour; stop; shut-down Emergency cut-out devices, evacuate Be careful; take precautions; examine Specific behaviour or action Doors; exits; escape routes. Equipment and facilities

20 Common Signs 3/19 Signage

21 Black pictogram on white background Red edging and diagonal line. PROHIBTION Round Shape 3/20 Signage

22 WARNING Triangular Shape Black pictogram on a yellow background Black edging 3/21 Signage

23 MANDATORY Round shape White pictogram on a blue background 3/22 Signage

24 EMERGENCY ESCAPE / FIRST AID Rectangular or Square shaped White pictogram on a green background 3/23 Signage

25 FIRE FIGHTING Rectangular or Square shaped White pictogram on a red background 3/24 Signage

26 Hazardous Substances 3/25 Signage Each container of a hazardous substance must have attached to it a label indicating the main hazard associated with the substance. Staff and Students must be aware of what each means although as can be seen some are self-explanatory Corrosive ExplosiveHarmful FlammableBiological Hazard All are black triangle with yellow background

27 Hazardous Substances 3/26 Signage

28 Work Equipment - Controls 3/27 Work Equipment - Controls

29 Work Equipment- Controls What is defined as work equipment ? Basically any equipment used when carrying out a workplace activity. drilling machines, circular saws, photocopiers screwdrivers, knives, scalpels, files. lift trucks, hoists, ladders etc What needs to be done ? look at equipment in use and decide what can cause risk. look at what can be done to prevent risk and see if this is being done. decide whether more needs to be done. THEN DO IT 3/28 Work Equipment -Controls

30 No guards Dirty work area Clean No clutter Correct guards 3/29 Work Equipment -Controls

31 Work Equipment - Controls How does risk arise when using work equipment ? using the wrong equipment for a particular task lack of guards or poorly maintained guards on machinery lack of safety devices or poorly maintained safety devices on machinery. having inadequate controls or the wrong types of controls so that equipment cannot be turned off quickly and safely. Also must ensure that equipment cannot be started accidentally. failure to provide proper information and training. When identifying risks : be aware of what the piece of equipment actually does. be aware of who will be using the equipment be aware of the design and appropriateness of safety guards and devices be aware of type of power supply - electricity, hydraulics, etc 3/30 Work Equipment -Controls

32 Work Equipment - Accidents 3/31 Work Equipment - Accidents

33 Dangers: Some machines have traps where parts of the machine come together. Parts of the the body such as fingers and limbs can be trapped. Clothes and hair can be caught and entangled in rotating parts of machinery. Machines with rotating parts can eject and throw out particles and cuttings. Drills, Cutters, saws are designed to cut metals - tend to cut through flesh and bone with ease when they make contact with any part of the human body. Harm can be done by the impact of moving machinery parts. 3/32 Work Equipment - Accidents

34 Work Equipment - Accidents It is not only large pieces of machinery or specialised equipment which may cause harm. Hammers, chisels, screwdrivers, spanners all these types of hand tools need to be properly maintained. What should Staff / Students do ? Before agreeing to carry out a particular work activity a member of Staff or Student must be certain that: they know how to operate the equipment to be used. they are aware of the required safety controls and how to use them. all guards are in the correct position and that safety devices are working. the area around the equipment is clean, tidy and free from obstruction. they are wearing appropriate PPE. 3/33 Work Equipment - Accidents

35 Work Equipment Summary The University has a duty to provide and maintain suitable and safe work equipment. The 5 main dangers from work equipment are: Traps Entanglement Contact Ejection Impact Work equipment can be made safer by: Design Positioning Guarding Each piece of work equipment should have a Standard Operating Procedure which must be followed. 3/34 Work Equipment

36 Electricity - Hazards and Risk 3/35 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

37 Each year about 1000 accidents at work involving electricity are reported to the H.S.E. Of these around 30 are fatal. We depend on electricity to carry out almost every workplace task. Therefore everyone must be aware of the hazards and risks associated with the use of electricity. 3/36 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

38 Main hazards Contact with live parts causing shocks and burns. Faults which could cause fires Fire or explosion where electricity could be the source of ignition. Main risks Electric shocks when electricity passes through the body. Fires ~ 20% of all workplace fires are started by electrical appliances. 3/37 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

39 The risk of injury from electricity is strongly linked to where and how it is used. The risk being greatest in harsh conditions: in wet surroundings outdoors in cramped spaces with a lot earthed metalwork. Some items of equipment involve greater risk than others: Extension leads Electrical socket adaptors Equipment which is moved around at lot. 3/38 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

40 Reducing the risk Ensure that electrical installations are safe: Install new electrical systems to a suitable standard (BS 7671) Existing installations must be properly maintained. Provide enough socket-outlets Provide safe and suitable equipment: » Choose electrical equipment that is suitable for its working environment. » Ensure that equipment is maintained in a safe condition. » Provide an accessible and clearly identified power off-on switch in case of an emergency. » Ensure damaged cables, sockets and plugs are replaced. » Protect lightbulbs from being damaged. Reduce the voltage: Battery operated tools are safest. If possible use 110 volt supply tools 3/39 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

41 Provide a safety device: If equipment is being operated at 230 volts or higher an RCD ( Residual Current Device) can provide additional protection. RCDs for people protection have a rated tripping current (sensitivity) of not more than 30mA. Carry out preventative maintenance: The University is required, by law, to ensure that all electrical equipment and installations are adequately maintained. An appropriate system of visual inspection and testing should be set up. The frequency of inspections and any necessary testing will depend on the type of equipment and the environment it is being used in. Records of these actions must be kept and be made available on request. 3/40 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

42 Work safely: The University must ensure that Staff and Students working with electricity are competent to do so. Supervisory Staff must ensure that: Suspect or faulty equipment is taken out of use. Staff and Students do not attempt equipment repairs or alterations. These must be carried out by suitably qualified Staff or Contractors. Staff and Students do not work on or near exposed live parts of equipment. 3/41 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

43 General Guidelines Sockets and Plugs: Follow the one socket one plug rule - avoid using adapters if possible. Ensure, when purchasing plugs and sockets, that they are good quality. Buying cheap may cause long term, expensive problems. Cables / Flex: These wear with age. Damaged cables or flex must be replaced immediately by a qualified person. Power: Never plug-in or unplug equipment when the power supply is on. If switches, plugs or sockets become hot turn of the power and have them checked. 3/42 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

44 Electricity and Water: Never touch or handle any piece of electrical equipment if your hands are wet. A perfectly safe piece of equipment may become lethal if wet. Good Practice: Electrical equipment should be regularly checked by a qualified person. Repair and maintenance should only be carried out by a qualified person. 3/43 Electricity - Hazards and Risk

45 Hazards and Risk associated with fire 3/44 Hazards and Risk associated with fire

46 Hazards and Risk associated with fire 3/45 Hazards and Risk associated with fire Under the Health and Safety Act Staff and Students have a legal duty to look after their own health and safety along with that of collegues and vistors. This means that they should be aware of what is required to stop fires starting and know what to do if they are ever involved with a fire. Approx. 50% of fires are caused by faults or misuse of electrical appliances, faults in electrical wiring, careless smokers and the misuse of tools.

47 Hazards and Risk associated with fire 3/46 Hazards and Risk associated with fire j Burns j Smoke j Toxic Fumes j Suffocation j Property Damage The main dangers associated with fire are:

48 Hazards and Risk associated with fire 3/47 Hazards and Risk associated with fire Burns: Vary in severity Minor - outer layer of skin is injured - heals well Major - layers of skin damaged - leaves scar Deep - seriously damages parts of body under skin leading to fluid loss Also breathing in of hot fumes can burn iternal tissue Smoke Smoke irritates the throat and eyes. Causes panic making logical thinking difficult and escape by correct route difficult. Toxic Fumes Synthetic materials can, when burning, give off toxic fumes which can kill a person, breathing them in, very quickly.

49 Hazards and Risk associated with fire 3/48 Hazards and Risk associated with fire Suffocation The oxygen level in a burning room is very low leading to suffocation of any inhabitants. Property Damage Fire damage weakens the structure of buildings.

50 Safe Evacuation Procedures 3/49 Safe Evacuation Procedures Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

51 Safe Evacuation Procedures 3/50 Safe Evacuation Procedures Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University The variation in buildings across the Robert Gordon University campus causes problems in trying to ensure Safe Evacuation of University premises in the event of a fire or any other emergency. So it is impertative that Staff, Students, Visitors and Contracted Workers are made aware of: j Fire Alarm sound. j Safest evacuation route. j Muster Points. j Identity of Evacuation Assistants. j All clear sound. The University has an obligation, under law, to ensure that all persons on its premises, at any time, are informed of current Safe Evacuation Procedures

52 3/51 Safe Evacuation Procedures Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University General evacuation of a building. It is the responsibility of each lecturer / tutor / senior person within each room to ensure that the room is evacuated and that all windows and doors to that room are shut. All personal belongings must be left as nothing must hinder the evacuation of the room/area. Singage across the University is standard with regard to emergency evacuation. Follow the Green Arrows and the Green Running Man There must be no running towards the emergency exits, everyone should act in a controlled and well ordred manner. Once outside of the building the allocated muster points must be strictly adhered to - required to carry out head-count

53 Safe Evacuation Procedures 3/52 Safe Evacuation Procedures Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Role of Evacuation Assistants: A minimum of two Evacuation Assistants should be on duty within a building when wheelchair users and others with mobility difficulties are likely to be present. Evacuation Assistants are responsible for helping wheelchair users and those with mobility difficulties to evacuate buildings using an Evac-Chair. Evacuation Assistants should be aware of all Fire Exits, where they lead and the nature of the exit area - stairs or ramp. Evacuation Assistants will be fully aware of correct evacuation procedures for their own particular building.

54 Appropriate and correct use of Fire Extinguishers 3/53 Fire Extinguishers

55 Appropriate and correct use of Fire Extinguishers 3/54 Fire Extinguishers Foam Cream label on main Red background Suitable for use on: j Freely burning materials e.g. Liquid fires

56 Appropriate and correct use of Fire Extinguishers 3/55 Fire Extinguishers Water All Red Suitable for use on: j Freely burning materials e.g. Paper, wood

57 Appropriate and correct use of Fire Extinguishers 3/56 Fire Extinguishers CO 2 Black label on Red background Suitable for use on: j Freely burning materials j Electrical fires

58 Appropriate and correct use of Fire Extinguishers 3/57 Fire Extinguishers Powder Blue label on Red background Suitable for use on: j Freely burning materials j Electrical fires j Flammable liquids

59 Appropriate and correct use of Fire Extinguishers 3/58 Fire Extinguishers At all Fire Extinguisher points this label will be close- by giving detail of: Type of extinguisher Which type of fire to be used on. Warning as to what type of fire not to be used on. Warning of specific handling instructions.


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