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October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Forestry in Scotland. October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Why is forestry important in Scotland? Total Woodland – 1341 thousand hectares.

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Presentation on theme: "October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Forestry in Scotland. October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Why is forestry important in Scotland? Total Woodland – 1341 thousand hectares."— Presentation transcript:

1 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Forestry in Scotland

2 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Why is forestry important in Scotland? Total Woodland – 1341 thousand hectares 47% of UK Total Direct employment in forestry – (does not include wood processing) 48% of UK total Forestry supports an estimated jobs in Scotland + jobs in England & Wales. Contributes approximately £557 million to the Scottish economy (more than £1 billion when associated industries are included)

3 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 What is the Forest Industry? Forest Management - plant trees, insect control, weed control + wildlife management - shoot deer. Harvest trees - fell the trees (machine + chainsaws), extract to forest roadside, transport timber to end user. Build & maintain roads. Machine repair - on site, in workshop Countryside recreation - walking, cycling, horse riding, etc.

4 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Chainsaw Work

5 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Mechanised Harvesting

6 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Mechanised Harvesting

7 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Forestry in Rural Scottish Communities Very importance to those working and living in rural areas as it brings economic activity and employment to fragile and remote rural communities. Contributes to increasing tourism in rural and remote areas. Provides opportunity for rural development as well as business diversification and development Potential to provide more green jobs. The Scottish Forestry Strategy – a framework for the continuing development of Scotlands forestry industry - recently approved by ministers.

8 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Analysis of Forestry Accident Data Forestry has a fatal accident rate of 30.8 per 100,000 employees. By far the highest employee fatal accident rate of all industry sectors. It is over three times higher than the overall agriculture sector - the next highest fatal accident rate. Forestry also has the highest major injury accident rate of all industry sectors with major injuries per 100,000 employees. The largest number of overall and fatal accidents are reported in Scotland. Findings clearly highlighted the high risk nature of forestry work.

9 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 FM&O Accidents Reported in Forestry Between 1996/ /04 by Region

10 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 FM&O Accidents Reported in Forestry Between 1996/ /04 by Employment Status

11 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 FM&O Accidents Reported in Forestry by Agent

12 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 What are our main health & safety problems? Safety Hung up trees Hit by trees/branches Electricity Machines rolling over Slips / trips Falls from heights Lone working Health Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome Noise Whole Body Vibration Pesticides Muscoskeletal disorders

13 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 AFAG Four Influence Network (IN) workshops were conducted in Scotland with various industry groups in order to identify the different influences on health and safety. throughout the forestry management chain. Workshops included managers and forestry workers Individual workshops held targeting chainsaw operators

14 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Issues raised Commercial Pressure –Insufficient time to follow all the safety rules because jobs wont meet deadlines On the job communication –People often dont know where other people are during a job which creates risks. Training –Many contractors of the opinion that training is poor and does not prepare people for the job. Site safety coordination –Need to identify who has responsibility and how the role should be defined. Communication of information –The contractual chain poses problems for communicating risk assessments, site rules etc.

15 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 Issues raised Forest Work Manager –Confusion as to who fills this role and/or the visibility of the person in this role. Safety standards/procedures –Contractors find many to be unworkable, e.g. hung-up trees – compliance is poor. Suitable workers –Becoming increasingly difficult: those who are entering the industry from the UK are not properly trained while foreign workers present communication difficulties. Financial constraints –Smaller companies/contractors are working to tight margins which does not allow adequate resource to be put to safety. This was recognised at all levels.

16 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 AFAG Key group in Forestry and Arboriculture health & safety. Guidance accepted as good practice almost universally across the industry. AFAG Project Groups address current, emerging and future issues Involve input from industry, Forestry Commission and HSE Most projects have or will deliver key aims and outputs including: Improved communications (new Tree work and AFAG websites) New Guidance produced for high risk issues Review and development of training and certification in Tree work Research into the causes of accidents in forestry to provide further evidence base for future projects/interventions Health issues such as Noise, HAVs and WBV

17 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 AFAG Workplan under development Potential Future Projects include: Improving delivery of rehabilitation services in rural areas in Scotland (in Partnership with PHASS) Lone working and emergency procedures Preventing chainsaw accidents Raising awareness of risks in forestry (better communication) Improving management of occupational health in forestry Improving Forestry Management (FWMs and Site Safety Coordinator) Small-scale forestry machinery

18 October 2007Emily Ramsay1

19 October 2007Emily Ramsay1 QUESTIONS?


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