Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

How Science Works. How Science Works (HSW) Learning objectives To recognise the strands of How Science Works in the national curriculum To have ideas.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "How Science Works. How Science Works (HSW) Learning objectives To recognise the strands of How Science Works in the national curriculum To have ideas."— Presentation transcript:

1 How Science Works

2 How Science Works (HSW) Learning objectives To recognise the strands of How Science Works in the national curriculum To have ideas about how to deliver some of these strands To have some experience in planning the delivery of some of the HSW activities

3 What is HSW? Previous national curriculum for Key stages 3 and 4 Most of the statements in the Programme of Study refer to knowledge Some statements refer to Ideas and evidence (to be delivered while teaching the knowledge part of the curriculum) and some to Investigative skills Current national curriculum – Key stages 3 and 4 Majority of the Programme of study is taken up with Key Concepts and Key Processes (KS3) or HSW (KS4). Very little knowledge explicitly stated – what is there is the Range and Content. New national curriculum - KS3 (Sept 2014) and KS4 Most of the statements in the Programme of Study refer to knowledge Some statements refer to Working scientifically (to be delivered while teaching the knowledge part of the curriculum) which includes Scientific attitudes and Experimental skills and investigations.

4 What is it? Key Stage 3 1. Key concepts 1.1 Scientific thinking a Using scientific ideas and models to explain phenomena b Analysing and evaluating evidence from observations and experiments 1.2 Applications and implications of science a Application of science can bring about technological developments and change the way people think b Ethical and moral implications of using and applying science.

5 What is it? Key Stage 3 1. Key concepts 1.3 Cultural understanding a Modern science draws on a variety of valid approaches to scientific practice from different cultures 1.4 Collaboration a Sharing developments across disciplines

6 What is it? Key Stage 3 2. Key processes 2.1 Practical and enquiry skills Pupils should be able to: a use a range of scientific methods and techniques to develop and test ideas and explanations b assess risk and work safely in the laboratory c plan and carry out practical investigative activities, both individually and in groups. 2.2 Critical understanding of evidence Pupils should be able to: a obtain, record and analyse data from a wide range of primary and secondary sources, including ICT sources, and use their findings to provide evidence for scientific explanations b evaluate scientific evidence and working methods.

7 What is it? Key Stage 3 2. Key processes 2.3 Communication Pupils should be able to: a use appropriate methods, including ICT, to communicate scientific information and contribute to presentations and discussions about scientific issues.

8 Organisation Integral part of science course Y7 upwards Incorporate How Science Works activities relevant to the topics discussed, allowing skills and confidence to be built up gradually

9 What is it? Key Stage 4 Data, evidence, theories and explanations 1 Pupils should be taught: a how scientific data can be collected and analysed b how interpretation of data, using creative thought, provides evidence to test new ideas and develop theories c how explanations of many phenomena can be developed using scientific theories, models and ideas d that there are some questions that science cannot currently answer, and some that science cannot address

10 What is it? Key Stage 4 Practical and enquiry skills 2 Pupils should be taught to: a plan to test a scientific idea, answer a scientific question, or solve a scientific problem b collect data from primary or secondary sources, including using ICT sources and tools c work accurately and safely, individually and with others, when collecting first-hand data d evaluate methods of collection of data and consider their validity and reliability as evidence.

11 What is it? Key Stage 4 Communication skills 3 Pupils should be taught to: a recall, analyse, interpret, apply and question scientific information or ideas b use both qualitative and quantitative approaches c present information, develop an argument and draw a conclusion, using scientific, technical and mathematical language, conventions and symbols and ICT tools.

12 What is it? Key Stage 4 Applications and implications of science 4 Pupils should be taught: a about the use of contemporary scientific and technological developments and their benefits, drawbacks and risks b to consider how and why decisions about science and technology are made, including those that raise ethical issues, and about the social, economic and environmental effects of such decisions c how uncertainties in scientific knowledge and scientific ideas change over time and about the role of the scientific community in validating these changes.

13 Tricky tracks Helps students to distinguish between observation and inference Encourages pupils to look carefully at the evidence Encourages pupils to discuss and develop theories All ideas are valid unless there is further evidence to suggest otherwise Demonstrates how more evidence can change the theory All can contribute There is no right answer Thinking about what other evidence to collect to test theory

14 Tricky tracks This addresses the following from the KS4 Programme of study 1b how interpretation of data, using creative thought, provides evidence to test ideas and develop theories 3c to present information, develop an argument and draw a conclusion 4c how uncertainties in scientific knowledge and scientific ideas change over time

15 Which questions do scientists know the answer to? Which will they never know? 1. Did dinosaurs die out when a meteor hit the Earth? 2. Why does the yolk of a hard-boiled egg go a funny green colour around the edge? 3. Can human beings be cloned? 4. Will you live longer if you exercise regularly? 5. Is it possible to travel back in time? 6. What will happen to the Universe eventually? 7. Is there life on other planets? 8. Should insurance companies be allowed to ask if you are genetically likely to develop diseases?

16 Risk In groups of 3 or 4. The group should agree on a ranking of the risks from highest to lowest. One person picks out from the cards the three which they are personally most concerned about. These individuals explain the reasons behind their choices

17 Risk Being in a minor car accident Dying from an asteroid collision Killed by a falling coconut Catching flu Dying from a heart attack

18 Risk The key concepts of consequence and likelihood

19 Teaching strategies? Doing practical work and analysing data Looking at historical development of ideas e.g. of structure of the atom. Using models to explain scientific phenomena explicit recognition that this is a model clarity in which part of the model represents which part of the object discussion of what the model can and cannot explain refinement of the model (or adoption of a new one) at later key stages, explaining why

20 Teaching strategies? Looking at contemporary issues including discussion of social, economic and environmental impact of decisions discussion of ethical and moral implications media reporting risk

21 Teaching strategies? Discussion Debate Hot-seating Role-play and drama Developing an argument Presentation

22 What is your position as the teacher? What are the pros and cons of:- Teacher is an impartial chairperson of a discussion group. Teacher makes known his/her views during discussion. Teacher presents pupils with a wide, balanced range of alternative views. Devils advocate - the teacher consciously takes up the opposite position to the one expressed by pupils or teaching materials.

23 STEM Support for schools in science, technology and mathematics – National STEM Centre in York Enrichment for pupils (challenges, hands-on workshops, science and engineering ambassadors) Support for teachers in support centres (CPD) Business links

24 How Science Works (HSW) Learning objectives To recognise the strands of How Science Works in the national curriculum To have ideas about how to deliver some of these strands To have some experience in planning the delivery of some of the HSW activities

25 References BioEthics Education Project Kind, V. & Kind, P.M. (2009) Teaching Secondary How Science Works, London: Hodder Education Planet science Physics Ethics Education Project Science Year CDs, ASE

26 References Strengthening teaching and learning in science through using different pedagogies Unit 1: Using group talk and argument (Science PedPack) Strengthening teaching and learning in science through using different pedagogies Unit 5: Teaching the science of contemporary issues (science PedPack) UPD8 Warren, D. (2001) The nature of science, London: Royal Society of Chemistry Wellington, J. (2000) Teaching and learning secondary science, Abingdon: Routledge


Download ppt "How Science Works. How Science Works (HSW) Learning objectives To recognise the strands of How Science Works in the national curriculum To have ideas."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google