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Good outcomes? A cohort analysis of students progression through a Foundation degree and beyond Julie Wintrup, Sally Lumley, Liz James University of Southampton.

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Presentation on theme: "Good outcomes? A cohort analysis of students progression through a Foundation degree and beyond Julie Wintrup, Sally Lumley, Liz James University of Southampton."— Presentation transcript:

1 Good outcomes? A cohort analysis of students progression through a Foundation degree and beyond Julie Wintrup, Sally Lumley, Liz James University of Southampton UALL conference, March 2012

2 If it is a good thing to leave an educational programme with a degree then is it possible to ensure more students persist through to achieve this goal? 2

3 3 I do not want to see the currency of higher education undermined by the creation of a stratified sector in which some forms of provision are considered excellent and others second-rate... Diversity with excellence will also mean identifying new routes into higher education and new forms of provision... We have to develop new higher education opportunities at this level (intermediate skills), oriented strongly to the employability skills, specialist knowledge and broad understanding needed in the new economy David Blunkett, Secretary of State for Education, 2000

4 Of 306 entrants to the Fd over 4 years: 22.5% left with no qualification 3.6% left with Certificate in Higher Education 73.8% achieved their Foundation degree 4

5 Of those who gained a Cert HE or Fd…. 94 progressed further at Southampton within two years 5

6 Of the original 306 entrants 2005/6 – 2008/9: 22.5% left without a qualification 46.8% left with Cert HE or Fd And of the 30.7% or 94 who went further at Southampton: 10 gained a diploma 84 a degree (8 x 1 st class) many with a professional qualification 6

7 Once I finish this and have got over the stresses of it, Ill be looking for the next thing I can do and I think it will carry on for a long time... I will get a huge, huge amount of satisfaction and pride of knowing that I will have been the first person in our family to do a degree 7

8 FE was never an option, my family didnt have the money to support me through uni and it was never mentioned Its opening up areas which I wouldnt even have considered at the beginning of the year, because I didnt know they were out there 8

9 The second year... was hard. Stressful, because I was still working, and the assignments I found, were much more in- depth, and the memories I have first and foremost, being in tears most of the time, saying I cant do this. Well actually I couldnt do it 9

10 a couple of people on my course were goingI dont want to do this anymore, Im going to give up… (enacts) Oh no you dont give up! Youre not! and you sort of help them out there... 10

11 Three of us, weve had to really fight for it, for the course really, just to get from lectures to seminars to everything else...and weve had to fight for everything....it was so annoying, it was so, that, I nearly gave up 11

12 We felt bewildered at the beginning. And then we all started realising that actually we had voices. So when we all decided to say something, it was brushed under the carpet at first, and then suddenly, it was recognised and apologies were made, and that was appreciated. That was really appreciated. And then we seemed all right again. We seemed to be okay again 12

13 But Im nosier; I want to know the background of things, and the facts and figures. You know, I want to know the depth of something; I dont just want to know the surface, and know my job, I want to know underneath why Im doing that, where does that come from, who said we had to do it like that. Whereas I never thought that before. Never went into depth like that before. 3 rd year student 13

14 Alienation feeling unable to engage or contribute in ways which are meaningful and productive This may include the experience of feeling held back, blocked, inhibited, estranged or isolated from what it is they are learning, and the study practices and learning processes, both individual and social, which are part of their particular learning context Mann, 2001:17; 2005: 43 14

15 criticality A crucial way out of the experience of alienation….is the development of the capacity to become aware of the conditions in which we work, and of the responses we make to them…to question, examine, uncover, reframe, make visible and interpret (Barnett, 1997) 15

16 Persistence While retention can be seen as institutional interventions made to retain the student, persistence is used to describe the individual students efforts to seek encouragement and support to persevere in his/her studies despite the challenges that he/she may face. … a student may persist ….despite a change of course, mode of study, campus or even institution Horstmanshof & Zimitat, 2007: 705 16

17 So: many - persistent - students described feeling held back, blocked, inhibited, estranged or isolated, at times, by our practices and processes but some interviewees described challenging and confronting those practices and in doing so, taking back control of their learning 17

18 Might we, more systematically, create conditions which foster persistence in students and support their individual and collective efforts to engage? 18


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