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Quality Geography for All. Quality Geography What does a quality geography curriculum look like?What does a quality geography curriculum look like? What.

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Presentation on theme: "Quality Geography for All. Quality Geography What does a quality geography curriculum look like?What does a quality geography curriculum look like? What."— Presentation transcript:

1 Quality Geography for All

2 Quality Geography What does a quality geography curriculum look like?What does a quality geography curriculum look like? What do pupils say after a quality geography lesson?What do pupils say after a quality geography lesson? Before we can monitor/evaluate the curriculum in our school we need to have firm criteria in our heads about what quality geography looks like. Key message: quality geography engages pupil interest, captures imagination and stimulates enthusiasm for learning.

3 Quality Geography in Practice Examples from Quality Mark pilot schools.

4 The study of geography stimulates an interest in and a sense of wonder about places. It helps young people make sense of a complex and dynamically changing world. It explains where places are, how places and landscapes are formed, how people and their environment interact, and how a diverse range of economies, societies and environments are interconnected. It builds on pupils own experiences to investigate places at all scales, from the personal to the global. Geographical enquiry encourages questioning, investigation and critical thinking about issues affecting the world and peoples lives, now and in the future. Fieldwork is an essential element of this. Pupils learn to think spatially and use maps, visual images and new technologies, including geographical information systems (GIS), to obtain, present and analyse information. Geography inspires pupils to become global citizens by exploring their own place in the world, their values and their responsibilities to other people, to the environment and to the sustainability of the planet.

5 A word from David Lambert... Pupils cannot be taught simply to think. They have to have something to think about. If this something is trivial, irrelevant or out of date then the education process will be devalued and impoverished. After the novelty of the initial pedagogic adventure, students will lose interest. And of course formulaic approaches, no matter how active and engaging, can soon lose that sense of adventure.Pupils cannot be taught simply to think. They have to have something to think about. If this something is trivial, irrelevant or out of date then the education process will be devalued and impoverished. After the novelty of the initial pedagogic adventure, students will lose interest. And of course formulaic approaches, no matter how active and engaging, can soon lose that sense of adventure.

6 Introducing the Secondary Geography Quality Mark

7 The Secondary Geography Quality Mark The overarching strength of the The overarching strength of the Quality Mark is its capacity to act Quality Mark is its capacity to act as an effective as an effective lever of change lever of change for the development of geography for the development of geography in schools... in schools...

8 Supporting geography departments in creating and extending the geography curriculum experience for all students. Part of a self-evaluation framework to support development at KS3 Indicators to enable teachers to think creatively and critically about developing a dynamic, relevant KS3 curriculum. The Secondary Geography Quality Mark

9 Whats in it for me? Identify and celebrate good geographyIdentify and celebrate good geography Provide a framework for subject leaders to analyse the curriculum and engage in curriculum makingProvide a framework for subject leaders to analyse the curriculum and engage in curriculum making Provide a framework and a tool to help geography teachers clarify their own CPD needsProvide a framework and a tool to help geography teachers clarify their own CPD needs Improve for all pupils the quality of the educational experience through geographyImprove for all pupils the quality of the educational experience through geography

10 About the pilot Sept 2006 – May 2007: schools involved in pilot 27 schools awarded the SGQM in September 2007 who had tested and explored ways to develop the process tested and explored ways to develop the process tested and developed the framework tested and developed the framework explored the nature of evidence and what constitutes quality geography explored the nature of evidence and what constitutes quality geography contributed to the development of the final documentation contributed to the development of the final documentation Ongoing production of a Tool Kit with a SEF, exemplar materials and CPD suggestions.

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12 Assessment The Quality Mark award is verified on the basis of written evidence – preferably provided electronically.The Quality Mark award is verified on the basis of written evidence – preferably provided electronically. Centre of Excellence status – dissemination of good practice and good geographyCentre of Excellence status – dissemination of good practice and good geography e.g. Organisation of a local geography competition Planning and hosting CPD events for primary and / or secondary colleagues Guiding another school through the Quality Mark process

13 How to plan, prepare and apply for the award Collaboratively complete self- evaluation using the criteria to establish the level which best describes the quality of geography in your school 1. Collaboratively complete self- evaluation using the criteria to establish the level which best describes the quality of geography in your school 2. Visual overview of the current situation and helps to identify areas of development 3. Produce action plan - stand alone, or preferably, complement subject SEF/ school improvement plan. 4. Register intention to apply for the Mark with the GA and pay the appropriate fee 5. Begin collecting evidence, maximum of TWO pieces for each of the criterion

14 The Framework

15 5a What level of quality has been achieved in the teaching and learning of Geography? EmergingDevelopedEnhancing 5ai) Places and topics are underpinned by a variety of types of geographical resources and media. These evidence a variety and range of perspectives. 5aii) Students become questioning learners through engaging in a range of enquiry activities, including decision making and dialogue. 5aiii) Students use geographical concepts confidently and in appropriate contexts, with the appropriate vocabulary. 5aiv) Students can demonstrate a sense of place through a knowledge and understanding of geographical concepts. This includes an understanding of interdependence between people and the physical environment. 5av) Lessons are suitably challenging and teachers aim to develop students capacity to learn independently by linking their learning to geographical concepts, trends and issues. Using the Checklist

16 Statement Department Example/s 1. What are the distinctive characteristics of Geography in your school? 1(a) Students relate geographical thinking with their everyday experiences, so that the relevance of geography is clear to them. 1(b) Students demonstrate an informed understanding of the geographys organising concepts such as place, interdependence, scale and process. The distinctiveness of geography is apparent. 1(c) The department is responsive to innovation in geography education and actively initiates developments in curriculum materials and organisation. 1(d) The department employs a variety of approaches to geography. These are regularly reviewed and evaluated for their effectiveness in supporting standards and achievement in geography 1(e) The KS3 curriculum incorporates the effective use of ICT, maps and fieldwork where appropriate. This should include GIS where possible and the use of high quality images and/or visualisation software. Reflection and evaluation Why do we do it like this? Why do we do it like this? How do we know it is successful? How do we know it is successful? What is the impact on teaching and learning? What is the impact on teaching and learning? Possible area/s for development Reflection Why did we do it like this? How do we know it is successful? What is the impact on teaching and learning? Using the local area allows our students to develop their own ideas and opinions in relation to issues on a range of scales, incorporating a humanistic approach to topics. Studying topical events have allowed them to understand the interdependence of countries and people and how geographical patterns can be changed and improved. This essentially allows them to form their own well evidenced and thought through ideas and opinions in addition to understanding the ephemeral nature of the world in which they live. Local fieldwork allows students to understand how their actions locally have a national and global impact. By presenting information to students in a variety of ways and viewpoints, they can appreciate diverse and different thinking. Students show interest and often enthusiasm with more active engagement and generally positive (informal) feedback from students. Areas for development Further development of student voice (see section 2) to enable students to be more involved in shared curriculum development

17 1. What are the distinctive characteristics of Geography in your school? CriteriaExemplification and Examples 1(a) Students relate geographical thinking with their everyday experiences so that the relevance of geography is clear to them In the first week of Year 7 students complete a Passport which links places they have visited at a variety of scales (local, national and international) and their experiences (personal and via the media) 1(b) Students demonstrate an informed understanding of the geographys organising concepts such as place, interdependence, scale and process. The distinctiveness of geography is apparent Students undertake an End of Unit evaluation which helps to identify and demonstrate their appreciation and understanding of the concepts covered in the Unit of Study 1c) The department is responsive to innovation in geography education and actively initiates development in curriculum materials and organisation Inductive learning exercise on What is the EU? enables students to find out aspects at their own pace and level. They then are able to produce a piece of extended writing on the subject. Using the EU Opinion Poll questionnaire also allows them to add their own opinions. The use of movies in Starters, as for Australia Day provides stimulation to students.

18 Comment from Pilot schools …..we have always had an open mind as to what we teach and how we teach, preferring innovation and change to stagnation and repetition. So when we had the chance to pilot SGQM we knew we were undertaking a process of national importance – a sense of setting off into the unknown.…..we have always had an open mind as to what we teach and how we teach, preferring innovation and change to stagnation and repetition. So when we had the chance to pilot SGQM we knew we were undertaking a process of national importance – a sense of setting off into the unknown. What was in it for you? Personal and professional challenge combined at a time of great change in what and how we were teaching. …….. A thorough overhaul of our lessons was needed and SGQM came at just the right time to establish whether the department was on the right tracks.Personal and professional challenge combined at a time of great change in what and how we were teaching. …….. A thorough overhaul of our lessons was needed and SGQM came at just the right time to establish whether the department was on the right tracks. A valuable, reflective process of continuous improvementA valuable, reflective process of continuous improvement

19 Administration costs (compare with INSET course costs) Small schools <750 pupils - £200 Medium schools pupils - £300 Large schools >1200 pupils - £400 'This is self-run CPD par excellence, for evidence from training evaluations shows that the one-off day, run by no-matter-how- inspiring a speaker, is generally found less effective as CPD than that where teachers themselves are the active participants, engaged in working on a relevant topic'. (Quote from Advisory Teacher)

20 Where Next? Be enthused!Be enthused! Sign up to gain support through the Secondary Geography Quality Mark forum of the developing VLE and to access to all Quality Mark CPDSign up to gain support through the Secondary Geography Quality Mark forum of the developing VLE and to access to all Quality Mark CPD

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22 Further information yqualitymark/www.geography.org.uk/secondary/secondar yqualitymark/ ssional-recognition/introduction/www.geographyteachingtoday.org.uk/profe ssional-recognition/introduction/

23 Keep in touch

24 Over to you... Use the criteria to identify what evidence you currently have that could contribute to a submissionUse the criteria to identify what evidence you currently have that could contribute to a submission What benefits would the SGQM bring to your department and school?What benefits would the SGQM bring to your department and school? Discuss a strategy to convince your Department team and SMT of the value of the SGQMDiscuss a strategy to convince your Department team and SMT of the value of the SGQM


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