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Using pupil movement (appealing to kinesthetic learners) to help introduce, recap on and reinforce the understanding of basic geographical concepts. Andrew.

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Presentation on theme: "Using pupil movement (appealing to kinesthetic learners) to help introduce, recap on and reinforce the understanding of basic geographical concepts. Andrew."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using pupil movement (appealing to kinesthetic learners) to help introduce, recap on and reinforce the understanding of basic geographical concepts. Andrew Puddephatt, The Kings School Macclesfield

2 Basically to stimulate them and avoid them looking like this! Images of bored people removed for copyright reasons

3 Used as a starter to introduce the idea of relief and height on maps. How to do it! 1)Tell the pupils that the classroom is Great Britain, with the back of the classroom being the very north etc. 2)Line pupils up in height order (descending). 3)Give each pair of pupils a significant mountain/relief feature in Great Britain according to their size – i.e. tallest would get Ben Nevis. 4)Position pupils around the room according to their mountain/relief feature. Key ideas learnt -Idea of relief is the shape of the land – highlands to lowlands. -Geography of Great Britain. -Can use our bodies to show height on a map, or 3D images/models – yet how can you on a map? You could adapt this - Significant mountain ranges around the world. - The location of major human/physical features in the Great Britain etc.

4 Cairn Gorm (1845m) Ben Macdui (1309m) Ben Nevis (1344m) Cheviots (815m) Cross Fell (893m) Scafell Pike (977m) Kinder Scout (636m) Snowdon (1085m) Brecon Beacons (886m) The Fens (below sea level) Cotswolds (250m approx) Chilterns (250m approx) Yes Tor (619m)

5 Kinder Scout Peak District 636 metres © Steve Cadman / Flickr

6 Scafell Pike Lake District 977 metres © Asands / Flickr

7 © 2006 Code Network Media Group www.maps-of-britain.co.uk

8 Factors influencing a microclimate Physical Features Surface Buildings/cities Aspect Shelter Illustrative images removed for copyright reasons

9 Whiteboard Sirs Desk Snow capped mountains Snow capped mountains Snow capped mountains Snow capped mountains Trees Lake Skyscrapers Dark buildings Think what might your local climate be and why?

10 Used as a plenary to recap on the factors that influence the climate of a small area. How to do it! 1)Split the pupils (by rows) into 3 groups. 2)Give the groups props/instructions. a)Snow-capped mountains – white cotton/sheets on heads, stand up and arms by their sides. b) Forest and lake – pupils in the middle stay seated, those around stand up with arms outstretched. c) City – pupils at front and rear stand up straight with arms by their sides (skyscrapers) and those in the middle stay seated yet with black jumpers on and spray some pollution amongst them (deodorant?). 3)Give each group time to think about what their climate will be like and why? 4) Feedback. a)Snow-capped mountains – cold high up (angle of slope, less land immediately around them) and snow capped so reflect heat. b) Trees give shelter, cooler. Lake in summer cooler, warmer in winter due to water heating up and cooling slowly. c) Skyscrapers funnel wind, cities give off heat (dark surfaces) and cars/factory pollution give off heat.

11 1)OS map races – set as a homework Once Y7 have got their free OS maps, demonstrate to them how to fold and unfold it. State that next lesson their will be an OS map folding race – there will be heats (each row) and then a grand final! 2) Tectonic plate movement Ask for volunteers to come to the front to demonstrate the movement of plates. Teacher describes the process as it occurs (i.e. friction, subducted etc). 1)Constructive – two pupils stood up with arms outstretched facing one another, move apart and one peeps their head up into between them. 2) Collision – two pupils with arms outstretched facing one another move together and join palms and move their arms up. 3) Destructive – two pupils with arms outstretched facing one another move together and one pupil's arms slide under the other pupil's arms. 4) Conservative - two pupils with arms outstretched facing one another move together yet grind past one another. Can also demonstrate just using your hands and pupils copy.

12 3) Direction 1) Have 8 direction labels stuck on the walls around the edges of your room. 2) Give pupils a map with several locations on and a compass rose. 3) Read out instructions…from Manchester to London you would have to travel? Pupils stand in the corner of the room that they think is the correct direction. 4) Urban zones Arrange pupils in a group and give them a set of 5 photographs and ask them to arrange themselves from the CBD to the rural/urban fringe. Quiz them as to why they came to their decisions. 5) Settlement hierarchy Arrange pupils in a group and give them a list of 4+ of settlements and ask them to arrange themselves according to size (population). 6) Word/sentence jumble As an introduction to a topic, break a word up/or a sentence and give pupils a couple of letters each from the word/sentence – they have to arrange themselves/work out what the word/sentence is. NorthNorthwest West NortheastSouth East LONDON LIVERPOOL CHESTER BUXTON WILMSLOW RAINOW HOPE FARM UR BAIN ZATI ONIS TH E GR OW TH OFCI TI ES URBANIZATION IS THE GROWTH OF CITIES

13 7) Class migration – put several scenarios on the board and pupils have to assemble in the area of the room that they think will have a dense population/encourage a settlement to develop. Whiteboard Sirs Desk Coal Fertile farmland Dense forest High mountains Desert River Coal Could change scenarios over time or add different elements – climate etc.

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16 HANDOUT

17 Using pupil movement (appealing to kinesthetic learners) to help introduce, recap on and reinforce the understanding of basic geographical concepts. Andrew Puddephatt The Kings School Macclesfield

18 Used as a starter to introduce the idea of relief and height on maps. How to do it! 1)Tell the pupils that the classroom is Great Britain, with the back of the classroom being the very north etc. 2)Line pupils up in height order (descending). 3)Give each pair of pupils a significant mountain/relief feature in Great Britain according to their size – i.e. tallest would get Ben Nevis. 4)Position pupils around the room according to their mountain/relief feature. Key ideas learnt -Idea of relief is the shape of the land – highlands to lowlands. -Geography of Great Britain. -Can use our bodies to show height on a map, or 3D images/models – yet how can you on a map? You could adapt this - Significant mountain ranges around the world. - The location of major human/physical features in the Great Britain etc.

19 Cairn Gorm (1845m) Ben Macdui (1309m) Ben Nevis (1344m) Cheviots (815m) Cross Fell (893m) Scafell Pike (977m) Kinder Scout (636m) Snowdon (1085m) Brecon Beacons (886m) The Fens (below sea level) Cotswolds (250m approx) Chilterns (250m approx) Yes Tor (619m)

20 © 2006 Code Network Media Group www.maps-of-britain.co.uk

21 Snowdon Wales 1085 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

22 Scafell Pike Lake District 977 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

23 The Fens Below Sea Level Image removed for copyright reasons

24 Ben Nevis Scotland 1344 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

25 Yes Tor Devon 619 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

26 Brecon Beacons Wales 886 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

27 Cross Fell Pennines 893 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

28 Cairn Gorm Scotland 1245 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

29 Ben Macdui Scotland 1309 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

30 Cheviots Northumberland 815 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

31 Kinder Scout Peak District 636 metres Image removed for copyright reasons

32 Cotswolds Oxfordshire/ Gloucestershire 250 metres approx Image removed for copyright reasons

33 Chilterns Buckinghamshire 250 metres approx Image removed for copyright reasons

34 Factors influencing a microclimate Physical Features Surface Buildings/cities Aspect Shelter

35 Whiteboard Sirs Desk Snow capped mountains Snow capped mountains Snow capped mountains Snow capped mountains Trees Lake Skyscrapers Dark buildings Think what might your local climate be and why?

36 Used as a plenary to recap on the factors that influence the climate of a small area. How to do it! 1)Split the pupils (by rows) into 3 groups. 2)Give the groups props/instructions. a)Snow-capped mountains – white cotton/sheets on heads, stand up and arms by their sides. b) Forest and lake – pupils in the middle stay seated, those around stand up with arms outstretched. c) City – pupils at front and rear stand up straight with arms by their sides (skyscrapers) and those in the middle stay seated yet with black jumpers on and spray some pollution amongst them (deodorant?). 3)Give each group time to think about what their climate will be like and why? 4) Feedback. a)Snow-capped mountains – cold high up (angle of slope, less land immediately around them) and snow capped so reflect heat. b) Trees give shelter, cooler. Lake in summer cooler, warmer in winter due to water heating up and cooling slowly. c) Skyscrapers funnel wind, cities give off heat (dark surfaces) and cars/factory pollution give off heat.

37 1)OS map races – set as a homework Once Y7 have got their free OS maps, demonstrate to them how to fold and unfold it. State that next lesson their will be an OS map folding race – there will be heats (each row) and then a grand final! 2) Tectonic plate movement Ask for volunteers to come to the front to demonstrate the movement of plates. Teacher describes the process as it occurs (i.e. friction, subducted etc). 1)Constructive – two pupils stood up with arms outstretched facing one another, move apart and one peeps their head up into between them. 2) Collision – two pupils with arms outstretched facing one another move together and join palms and move their arms up. 3) Destructive – two pupils with arms outstretched facing one another move together and one pupil's arms slide under the other pupil's arms. 4) Conservative - two pupils with arms outstretched facing one another move together yet grind past one another. Can also demonstrate just using your hands and pupils copy.

38 3) Direction 1) Have 8 direction labels stuck on the walls around the edges of your room. 2) Give pupils a map with several locations on and a compass rose. 3) Read out instructions…from Manchester to London you would have to travel? Pupils stand in the corner of the room that they think is the correct direction. 4) Urban zones Arrange pupils in a group and give them a set of 5 photographs and ask them to arrange themselves from the CBD to the rural/urban fringe. Quiz them as to why they came to their decisions. 5) Settlement hierarchy Arrange pupils in a group and give them a list of 4+ of settlements and ask them to arrange themselves according to size (population). 6) Word/sentence jumble As an introduction to a topic, break a word up/or a sentence and give pupils a couple of letters each from the word/sentence – they have to arrange themselves/work out what the word/sentence is.

39 © 2006 Code Network Media Group www.maps-of-britain.co.uk

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41 Image of Manchester city centre removed for copyright reasons

42 Image of mill building removed for copyright reasons

43 Image of terraced housing removed for copyright reasons

44 Image of semi detached house removed for copyright reasons

45 Image of detached house removed for copyright reasons

46 LONDON LIVERPOOL CHESTER BUXTON WILMSLOW RAINOW HOPE FARM

47

48

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54 URBANIZATION IS THE GROWTH OF CITIES

55 UR

56 BA

57 NI

58 ZA

59 TI

60 ON

61 IS

62 TH

63 E

64 GR

65 OW

66 TH

67 OF

68 CI

69 TI

70 ES

71 7) Class migration – put several scenarios on the board and pupils have to assemble in the area of the room that they think will have a dense population/encourage a settlement to develop. Whiteboard Sirs Desk Coal Fertile farmland Dense forest High mountains Desert River Coal Could change scenarios over time or add different elements – climate etc.


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