Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 1 Implementing a Complex Continuing Professional Development Agenda in Scottish Physical Education.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 1 Implementing a Complex Continuing Professional Development Agenda in Scottish Physical Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 1 Implementing a Complex Continuing Professional Development Agenda in Scottish Physical Education (Part 1) Matt Atencio, Mike Jess, & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh Complexity Conference Aberdeen University January 2009

2 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 2 Introduction In recent years, much written about the need for change in Physical Education e.g. Penney & Chandler, 2000; Jess & Collins, 2003; Kirk, 2004; Scottish Executive, 2004; Wright 2004 Increasing focus on the dominant Curriculum & Pedagogy PE models Main drivers now include lifelong learning, inclusion and connectivity agendas Significant impact on the importance of, and approaches to, Professional Learning (CPD)

3 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 3 Introduction Scottish context for change in PE positive since 2000 Curriculum & Pedagogy Curriculum for Excellence Health & Well-being to Core Lifelong Learning CPDMcCrone Agreement (35 hours) Physical Activity (PA) National PA Strategy Active Schools Programme PEPE Review –Curriculum Change –2 Curriculum Hours per Week –More CPD (particularly primary) HMIe (2001)

4 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 4 Introduction BUT Limited and inconsistent Primary PE CPD (and secondary) in Scotland Some teachers have no PE-CPD over their career (HMIe, 2001) Traditional top-down filling the empty vessel short course one off off site approach tends to dominate Some authorities have PE specialists to support but numbers and approaches vary considerably…..some have no specialists Recent PE-CPD research suggests professional learning is a much more complex process

5 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 5 The Presentation What do we mean by complexity theory in relation to education and, in particular, CPD? How has our understanding of complexity theory informed the initial CPD efforts of the Developmental Physical Education Group (DPEG) at the University of Edinburgh?

6 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 6 Understanding Complexity Theory From a human behaviour perspective Complexity theory considers the emergent processes by which we make sense of, and interact with, an ever-changing world Complex systems are not pre-programmed but made up of parts that interact flexibly both internally and with the external world These unpredictable interactions allow systems to adapt and develop in response to ever-changing environmental demands New patterns of activities and new rules of behaviour emerge (Davis and Sumara, 2006, p.5). As such, our world is self-organising and non-linear and emergent.

7 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 7 Complexity Theory & Education Complexity has implications for learning as it (learning)…. Emerges from the interactions between the system parts, which themselves are shifting, dynamic, and diverse. Is a nested collaborative and constructivist endeavour which views pupils, teachers, head teachers and administrators as inextricably linked Does not view learners as empty vessels whose minds need to be filled with set knowledges. Reflects a break from simplistic behaviourist notions of cause- effect and linear predictability

8 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 8 BUT No intention to present a polarised picture of education with complexity portrayed as good and behaviourism as bad. Propose a shift in emphasis from more behaviourist notions of learning and CPD to conceptions that are more complex, emergent, collaborative and inclusive.

9 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 9 The DPEG DPEG aims to influence the long term change agenda in PE through the development, delivery and evaluation of a lifelong developmental physical education programme Phase 1 (1999-2013) Focus on complex change agenda in 3-14 age range Curriculum Development (AARE, 2008) Pedagogy (AARE, 2008) Professional learning (Aberdeen, 2009)

10 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 10 Senior Secondary (& Beyond) Lifelong Physical Education Dimensions (Functional, Health, Performance, Recreational & Support) UPES (Upper Primary & Early Secondary) Core learning & Authentic Applications Early Years (Pre-School & Infant School) Early Moves & Basic Moves The Developmental Physical Education Programme

11 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 11 The DPEG CPD Project (2001-2011) Since 2001, alongside the curriculum and pedagogy developments, DPEG engaged in an increasingly complex CPD project Phase 1: The Basic Moves Project (2001-2007) Phase 2: Larger Scottish Primary Physical Education Project supported by the Government from 2006-2011. Presentation specifically focuses on first phase (2001-2007) A series of non-linear but interrelated CPD episodes –Traditional top-down CPD courses –Creation of emergent bottom-up self-organising learning communities.

12 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 12 The DPEG CPD Project (2001-2011) With many planned and unplanned activities, the project is… multi-dimensional, non-linear, interconnected… and unpredictable (Kuhn, 2008, p.182) Illustrative of a self-organizing complex system. As the CPD project progressed Increasing focus on collaborative learning and complexity driven principles Ever-expanding and diverse range of nested individuals, groups, institutions and agencies.

13 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 13 Basic Moves (2001-2007) Two related developments. Basic Moves Alternative early years physical education curriculum (i.e. aged 5-7 years) (Jess, Dewar & Fraser, 2004) Set out to help all children acquire a basic movement foundation to support their current physical activity engagement and also to scaffold their future physical activity participation. As emerged as a credible curriculum and pedagogy alternative to traditional multi-activity models, professional learning of two distinct groups of change agents emerged

14 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 14 Basic Moves (2001-2007) The DPEG Change Agents Core DPEG members and Basic Moves tutors who, from 2005 onwards, emerged as the key change agents in local contexts. The Basic Moves Change Agents Focus of the DPEGs initial CPD change endeavours Includes undergraduate physical education students at the University of Edinburgh, class teachers, active primary schools coordinators and primary physical education specialists, individual schools and communities, local authorities and key national institutions (see Figure 1).

15 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 15 Children Students Teachers, Specialist Teachers &Active Schools Coordinators Schools & Communities Local Authorities National Institutions The Nested Nature of the DPEGs Complex Professional Learning System

16 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 16 Basic Moves (2001-2007) DPEG-CPD became increasingly complex –Early CPD/ITE work within a more localised University and community context –Soon extended into the wider national arena. –Various self-organising, emergent, edge of chaos and collaborative examples of how these nested change agents responded to the planned and unplanned professional learning experiences

17 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 17 Complex Professional Learning and the DPEG The DPEG Group DPEG development is central to its curriculum, pedagogy and CPD endeavours Initial funding enabled creation of a small staffing base to focus on Basic Moves and work with ITE students Community-based clubs facilitated shared development of Basic Moves and DPEG members attended postgraduate motor development courses Emergence of a self-organising, collaborative and situated learning community

18 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 18 Complex Professional Learning and the DPEG In practice, collaboration provided unsettling edge of chaos experiences particularly as group members used to working independently and often in an isolated and marginalised context Also, Basic Moves challenged their (often) traditional linear PE pedagogy, so awkward meetings ensued as issues debated Nevertheless, began to develop a –shared vision of EYPE based on their prior knowledge, developing knowledge and collaborative experience –desire to undertake future curriculum, pedagogy and professional learning work as a long term change agenda

19 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 19 Complex Professional Learning and the Basic Moves Change Agents Undergraduate ITE Students Difficult to engage as only available students enrolled on the B.Ed. (Hons) in Physical Education Although able to teach PE in primary and secondary schools, focus very much on the secondary school years Basic Moves included but did not fit easily with the dominating multi-activity model and national certification awards For most students, Basic Moves perceived to be a marginal and unnecessary part of their certification….. marginal participation In short term, slowed down the development process

20 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 20 Expansion of Basic Moves Professional Development Structures Class Teachers, Specialists & Active School Coordinators From 2002, complex CPD issues emerged as Basic Moves moved beyond the University Two distinct CPD approaches : Traditional top-down national approach & collaborative local small-scale school-based approach Top-down justified given traditionally marginal status of EYPE Basic Moves National Conference in 2003 Pilot courses with Active School coordinators Basic Moves Training Programme in March 2004.

21 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 21 Expansion of Basic Moves Professional Development Structures 2 day University-based courses moving beyond tips for teachers to challenge perceptions of EYPE before offering pedagogical advice Overwhelmingly positive evaluations from most delegates BUT, unclear exactly what was happening in schools and communities….. the cascade model? AND, the empty vessels, one–off, off-site course delivery was problematic for some experienced physical activity professionals, particularly primary physical education specialists Small number (but key stakeholders) overtly dissatisfied. 2 formal edge of chaos clear the air meetings required

22 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 22 Expansion of Basic Moves Professional Development Structures Issues raised similar to early DPEG meetings, but top-down course did not create context for issues to be ironed out Participants felt marginalised, rather than taking part in full or partial ways as had happened with the early DPEG participants Therefore, national training successfully raised profile of EYPE BUT, problems inherent in traditional top-down approach emerged highlighted need for professional learning experiences that were more situated, collaborative and, critically, differentiated to meet the needs of the different groups of professionals.

23 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 23 Expansion of Basic Moves Professional Development Structures Schools, Communities & Local Authorities Alongside the national training programme, a more strategic, collaborative, situated and, ultimately, differentiated pilot programme introduced in three East Lothian primary schools. Supportive nested starting point with key stakeholders BUT, edge of chaos experiences as one head teacher withdrew and one specialist was not enthused DPEG member working on-site offered courses, support seminars and collaborative learning opportunities….so issues raised resolved though immediate and directly meaningful support

24 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 24 Expansion of Basic Moves Professional Development Structures Building on national and local experiences, a Basic Moves tutor programme was introduced in 2005 Aimed to create a network to deliver and support Basic Moves within their own local authorities. Moved Basic Moves in a collaborative direction with leadership and ownership of developments distributed across the range of tutors in their own local authorities DPEG became engaged with multiple and overlapping nested communities from parents to directors of education

25 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 25 Expansion of Basic Moves Professional Development Structures Consequently, following rapid, chaotic national expansion, localised Basic Moves Learning Communities emerged across Scotland and England. Local authority projects emerged and evolved in different ways to fit local aspirations and needs Some authorities, even with tutors in place, rejected Basic Moves for a host of different reasons which include specialist teacher perceptions, finance and conflicting interest. Nevertheless, the tutor programme over the years symbolises the ways in which collaborative structures support the development of more sustainable learning communities……

26 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 26 Complex & Traditional Forms of CPD Nested/ Connective CPD Context Hierarchical CPD Context Developmental (bottom-up) Nested Collaborative Negotiation Networks Deep learning Shared vision Top-down Unrelated Solitary Prescription Bureaucracy Surface learning Absolutist vision

27 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 27 Conclusion In parallel with the Curriculum & Pedagogy change efforts, the first phase of the DPEG CPD Project has employed a number of different professional learning approaches –Traditional top-down CPD courses –Creation of emergent bottom-up self-organising learning communities. However, during the phase, gradual move away from traditional top down, empty vessel approaches which proved to: bring about superficial and chaotic change alienate, and potentially upset, many individuals.

28 Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 28 Conclusion As a result The DPEG CPD efforts have shifted towards experiences based on collaborative and complexity driven principles…… emergence, self-organisation, connectivity, collaboration and edge of chaos Appear to be providing a more viable and engaging means of sustaining learning communities As such, we believe this complex approach has started to make a significant impact on changing the nature of EYPE in both local and broader contexts…. and is now the cornerstone of our move towards a National Primary CPD Programme in Phase 2 (2006- 2011).


Download ppt "Matt Atencio Mike Jess & Kay Dewar University of Edinburgh 1 Implementing a Complex Continuing Professional Development Agenda in Scottish Physical Education."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google