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World Issues Survey Conducted by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Geographical Association February 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "World Issues Survey Conducted by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Geographical Association February 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 World Issues Survey Conducted by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Geographical Association February 2009

2 Contents In this summary report: –Background & methodology –What young people think is important –What young people learn at school –Learning about the wider world –Key findings

3 Background & methodology

4 Background The Geographical Association commissioned research with year- olds to inform its role to promote geography. The aim of the GAs 2009 manifesto programme A Different View is to restate and reaffirm geographys place in the school curriculum. GA wished to understand what drives interest in the subject amongst pupils at Key Stage 3, and what issues they would like to learn about. The research examined the issues that Key Stage 3 pupils think are important and whether they feel they are learning about them. It explored: -The wider world issues that pupils think are important -Whether or not they have learnt about/discussed them at school -The lessons in which they have learnt about/discussed them -The importance they attach to learning about these issues

5 Methodology Results are based on 598 interviews carried out face-to-face with young people aged years old in England; fieldwork ran between 15 and 22 January 2009 Results are based on all respondents unless otherwise stated Base sizes are shown in brackets Where results do not sum to 100, this may be due to multiple responses, computer rounding or the exclusion of dont knows/not stated An asterisk (*) represents a value of less than one half or one percent, but not zero Data are weighted to gender, age and region

6 What young people think is important

7 Young people age most commonly mention Crime and anti-social behaviour (61%) as affecting the area where they live. Young people in GORs* West Midlands (70%) and South East (68%) are more likely to flag this than their peers in GORs East (52%) or London (50%)**. This issue is also more likely to be mentioned by young people in school Years 8-10 (65%) than those in Years 6 and 7 (53%). By social class, C1 young people are more likely to mention it than ABs (64% versus 52%). Overall, Economy and jobs (37%) is the second most frequently mentioned local issue, but is significantly more likely to be mentioned by young people in GORs East Midlands and West Midlands (46% and 51% respectively) than by those in GORs North East (23%), Yorkshire (30%) or South West (18%)**. No other issue is mentioned by over 15% of young people. Environment and climate change (14% overall) is more likely to be mentioned in London (25%) and the East Midlands (20%) than in the North West (8%), East (7%) or South West (7%)**. * Government Office Region; ** Indicative finding: some small base sizes

8 What young people think is important The picture is much more mixed when young people consider the issues affecting the world, although Crime and anti-social behaviour (45%) is once again the most cited. Young people in the North East, North West, West Midlands and South West are much more likely to say this than their peers elsewhere. For example, well over three in five young people in the North East mention this issue (67%) compared with less than one in five (18%) in GOR East**. Differences also emerge by social class (52% in AB and 51% in DE versus 41% in C1C2). War and terrorism (44%) replaces Economy and jobs (41%) as the issue in second position overall, with War and terrorism particularly top of mind in the South East (64% compared, for example, to 28% in the North West and 32% in Yorkshire)**. Mentions of Economy and jobs is highest in the West Midlands and London (58% and 55% versus, for example, 18% in the South West)**. As with War and terrorism, Environment and climate change (34%) and Poverty and hunger (32%) are seen to be much greater problems globally than locally.

9 Crime and jobs the big issues locally Crime and anti-social behaviour Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009 Which of the following issues, if any, do you think are the main issues affecting the area where you live at the moment? Please choose up to three. Economy and jobs Environment and climate change Health and illness Population growth and migration The future of water, oil and gas War and terrorism Poverty and hunger Wildlife conservation Transport and world travel Extreme acts of nature Other 3% None of these 9% Dont know 10% Inequality and discrimination

10 Crime, war and economy big globally Crime and anti-social behaviour Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009 Which of the following issues, if any, do you think are the main issues affecting the world at the moment? Please choose up to three. Economy and jobs Environment and climate change Health and illness Population growth and migration The future of water, oil and gas War and terrorism Poverty and hunger Wildlife conservation Transport and world travel Extreme acts of nature Other 1% None of these 1% Dont know 7% Inequality and discrimination

11 Crime and economy most important issues combined Crime and anti-social behaviour Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009 And which of the following issues, if any, do you think are the main issues affecting the area where you live/the world at the moment? Economy and jobs Environment and climate change War and terrorism Poverty and hunger Combined local area/world issues: Top 5 mentions

12 What young people learn at school

13 Crime and anti-social behaviour (50%) and Environment and climate change (46%) are the issues most likely to have been learnt or discussed at school, followed by Poverty and hunger (32%), Economy and jobs (30%), and War and terrorism (28%). Those aged are generally more likely to have discussed wider world issues, such as crime and the environment, although this may be due to having been at school longer than younger pupils. The environment is also significantly more likely to be discussed in the South West (62%) and South East (54%) compared to the North West (31%) and London (36%)**. Over half of young people in GOR East have discussed poverty at school compared to a fifth of those in the West Midlands (51% versus 20%), while war is most commonly mentioned by young people in the South East (42%) and West Midlands (36%) versus 13% of young people in Yorkshire**.

14 What young people learn at school Young people who have learnt about or discussed any of these issues at school are most likely to have done so in Geography (49%), followed by PSHE (30%), History (29%) and Citizenship (27%). There are significant differences in the proportions of young people discussing these issues in Geography by: –Year group: 57% of Year 8s and 52% of Year 9s, compared with 45% of Year 7s and 39% of Year 11s –Social class: 59% in AB versus 44% in DE Overall, young people aged are most likely to expect to learn about these issues in Geography (42%), more so than for Humanities (31%), Citizenship (30%), or PHSE (28%).

15 Issues learnt about at school Crime and anti-social behaviour Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009 And which of these issues, if any, have you learnt about of discussed in school? Any others? Economy and jobs Environment and climate change Health and illness Population growth and migration The future of water, oil and gas War and terrorism Poverty and hunger Wildlife conservation Transport and world travel Extreme acts of nature Other *% None of these 7% Dont know 5% Inequality and discrimination

16 Geography top subject for discussing issues Geography In which of the following subjects, if any, have you learnt about this issue/these issues? Any others? Citizenship PSHE English Science History RE Other subjects below 10% None of these 1% Dont know 3% Base: 529 children aged years old in England who have learnt about issues at school, January 2009

17 Geography where discussing issues expected Geography In which of the following subjects, if any, would you expect to learn about these issues? Any others? Citizenship PSHE English Science History RE Other subjects below 10% None of these 1% Dont know 10% Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009 Humanities

18 Learning about the wider world

19 The majority (93%) of young people aged think it is at least fairly important to learn about the issues affecting peoples lives in different parts of the world; 46% think it is very important. Young people in social class AB (62%) are significantly more likely to think it is very important to learn about these issues (versus 44% in C1C2 and 38% in DE), as are pupils in Year 7 (53% versus 41% in Years 8-10).

20 Learning about the wider world Because a large majority (over 90%) of young people agree it is important to learn about a range of wider world issues, it is more instructive to consider the relative proportions that definitely agree it is important to learn about them. Young people aged are most definitive about learning about how the world they live in may change in the future (59%), changes to the world around them and how they occur (56%), where resources, such as food, energy and water come from (52%), and – finally – people, societies and cultures in other parts of the world (49%). Furthermore, young people in social class AB are generally more likely than those in other classes to definitely agree, e.g. 70% versus 49% in both C1C2 and DE regarding where resources come from. Overall, two-thirds (63%) agree that not enough time is spent learning about the wider world in school, although only 19% definitely agree (a further 28% disagree). Agreement differs significantly by region with 78% in Yorkshire and 77% in the North West agreeing versus 44% in the North East and 45% in the South West**.

21 Learning about peoples lives elsewhere Very important Dont know Not very important Fairly important Not at all important How important, if at all, do you think it is for people your age to learn about the issues affecting peoples lives in different parts of the world? Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009

22 Learning about future change To what extent, if at all, do you agree or disagree with the following statements? It is important to learn/think about … Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009 People, societies and cultures in other part of the world Where the things I use, such as food, energy and water, come from Changes to the world around me and why they occur How the world I live in may change in the future

23 More time needed learning about wider world Definitely agree Dont know Tend not to agree Tend to agree Definitely disagree To what extent, if at all, do you agree or disagree with the following statement? There is not enough time spent on learning about the wider world in school? Base: 598 children aged years old in England, January 2009

24 Key findings

25 Young people see Crime and anti-social behaviour as the most important issue affecting either their local area or the world generally, followed by Economy and jobs. War and terrorism, Poverty and hunger, and Environment and climate change are also seen as more important issues globally. Crime and the Environment are the subjects that young people are most likely to have learnt about/discussed at school. Geography is the subject in which young people have most often learnt about/discussed these issues at school, and the one in which they most commonly expect to do so. The great majority think it is important to learn about issues affecting different parts of the world, particularly how the world they live in may change. Most young people think that not enough time is spent learning about the wider world in school.

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