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Accelerator Science at Daresbury - the early years A close-up and personal view by Vic Suller (Louisiana State University/CAMD)

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Presentation on theme: "Accelerator Science at Daresbury - the early years A close-up and personal view by Vic Suller (Louisiana State University/CAMD)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Accelerator Science at Daresbury - the early years A close-up and personal view by Vic Suller (Louisiana State University/CAMD)

2 In the beginning - there was NINA Synchrotron 5 Gev Circumference 220 m FoDO lattice Straights 1m & 3.5m Combined function Tune values 5.25, 5.25 Rep rate 50 Hz Beam power 1 kW

3 Accelerator Physicists at Daresbury 1966 Applied Physics Division Michael Crowley Milling Godfrey Saxon Neil Marks Ian Rabinowitz Vince Hatton Robin Tait Machine Division Tony Egginton Jerry Thompson Tom Aitken Mike Poole (Sept 1966) Vic Suller (Oct 1966) Alan Jackson (Oct 1968)

4 Machine Division responsibilities - external beams

5 1968 Tom Aitken & Vic Suller – In the NINA control room They are setting up the Spill Servo – to extend the duration of the beam spill

6 1968 First Synchrotron Light experiment - Ian Munro + Scott Hamilton (Manchester University) Scott Hamilton and Tom Aitken inside the NINA tunnel alongside the SR beam line

7 1968 First Synchrotron Light experiment - Notice the pile of lead bricks enclosing the experiment - very inconvenient!

8 1972 Two Beams into the Dedicated Synchrotron Light Facility Mike and John West in the SRF

9 Mike and Alan Jackson - shared an office for 15 years Alan's big NINA project was the diamond target. Mike's desk looks remarkably tidy - the paper mountain was yet to come!

10 1968 Design Study for the NINA Booster To provide a future for the lab, a 20 GeV synchrotron was proposed, tunneling under the Daresbury hillside. The design study was made by the Applied Physics division. In 1969 the Government announced that in future all UK high energy physics would be done at CERN. But the NSF van de Graff was approved. The Machine division became responsible for all NINA accelerator physics.

11 Controlling the NINA tune - programmed quadrupoles

12 Mike & Neil Marks at the NINA control desk Richard Walker can also be seen assisting – which puts this photo at 1977.

13 SRS replaced NINA The SRS was approved in 1975, although NINA kept running until 1977

14 1975 Computer Controlled Magnet Measurements Mike & Richard Walker develop a computer controlled Magnet Measurement system to automatically take and record precision field maps of the SRS magnets.

15 Computer Controlled Magnet Measuring Facility Celebrating the last SRS magnet to be measured circa 1979.

16 The SRS after HBL conversion

17 1980 Mike at the original SRS control desk

18 2004 Mike at the later SRS control desk

19 1985 Mike and the Undulator

20 1985 The SRS Undulator

21 Undulator Spectrum in the Visible For diagnostic purposes the undulator spectrum was shifted from the normal VUV into the visible. This was done by ramping the SRS energy down from injection (600 MeV) to 450 MeV.

22 HELIOS Compact Source Ring energy 0.6 Gev Bending field 3.5 T Bend radius 0.57 m Beam current 300 mA

23 HELIOS linac - now in Louisiana The HELIOS linac has been acquired by CAMD and will be installed with the existing linac to raise the injection energy from 200 to 300 MeV.

24 Mike - the Sportsman Mike's Sports:- Cricket Soccer (Everton) Table Tennis Golf Bowls (?) With George Wright and the Bowling Trophy

25 This was taken in the DL huts in the early 70s. Mike – Table Tennis action

26 Mike in the Daresbury Lab Cricket Team 1970 AEA knock out winners

27 Mike - my close colleague for 37 years

28 Mike Congratulations for your many contributions to accelerator science in the UK Best Wishes for a long and active Retirement


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