Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 THE INCLUSION DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (IDP) Supporting pupils with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 THE INCLUSION DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (IDP) Supporting pupils with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 THE INCLUSION DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (IDP) Supporting pupils with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties

2 2 Welcome Your presenters today are: Jackie Hibbert (SIPS -Senior School Development Adviser) Julie Thompson (SIPS - SEN Lead Consultant) Fiona Le Cras (SIPS - B&A consultant) Claire Page (Psychology Service - Senior Psychologist) Val Brown (Service Leader - Learning Support Service)

3 Outline of session – 09.15Introduction – 09.30Overview of IDP BESD – Meet the characters – 10.30Modules 1 and 2 Refreshments – Modules 3 and – Planning for implementation 3

4 4 The Youth of Today Young people have bad manners, contempt for older people and talk nonsense when they should work. Young people dont stand up any longer when adults enter the room. They contradict their parents, talk too much in company, guzzle their food, put their feet on the table and tyrannise their elders.

5 5 The IDP is not about the everyday behaviour of the majority of ordinary young people who push the boundaries. The IDP is about the minority of those ordinary young people who also have additional emotional needs, due to underlying medical or social difficulties. Sometimes these lead to mental health difficulties.

6 6 What the IDP is not The IDP is not training on everyday behaviour or classroom management. The IDP is not specialist training on working with pupils with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties. The IDP is not only for the SENCo or SEN department.

7 7 What the IDP is The IDP is training for all staff working with children and young people to give them foundation level knowledge about BESD. The IDP is about improving Quality First Teaching (QFT) and other provision to include children and young people with BESD. The IDP is about demystifying child and adolescent mental health so that every professional can understand their role in supporting children and young people with BESD.

8 8 Todays Session - AIMS By the end of the session participants should: Have a model and resources for training staff in their own school or place of work. Have an emerging plan for the organisation of training in their own school or place of work.

9 9 The IDP Supporting Pupils with BESD Resource DVDs including handbook have been sent to all schools (in school post) Also available on-line dcsf.gov.uk/node/ dcsf.gov.uk/node/251416

10 10 The IDP Resource – Why might it be used? Any CPD programme in school seeking to improve quality first teaching should consider this resource as part of that provision Evidence from schools ongoing monitoring and tracking may identify the need to improve the progress of pupils with BESD. Staff may identify this as an area for their own professional development. (See IDP BESD links with Professional Standards in pack)

11 11 The self-evaluation audit tool Will: help you identify confidence level of staff help you prioritise IDP activities for school improvement in the area of pupils with SEN and BESD provide baseline information about the perceived skills and knowledge of your staff against which to measure any gains Found in in the library section File 5.1: Self-evaluation checklist for the learner (See also hard copy in pack)

12 12 Assumes that the school embraces the features of effective CPD (see Key elements of Effective CPD located on page 7-8 of the accompanying booklet inside your DVD case) The approach

13 13 includes PowerPoint presentation - Information / Guidance notes for leadership teams Section for School Leaders

14 14 Meeting the needs of pupils with BESD is complex …and it needs to be addressed at the following levels: 1.Whole-school ethos and policies 2.Classroom practice, climate for learning and quality first teaching 3.Evidence based interventions where the progress of the pupil is monitored and which is delivered by appropriately trained staff

15 15 1. Whole school ethos and policies: suggested key questions for schools Is the desired ethos of the school shared with all stakeholders? How does the whole-school CPD programme ensure that all staff have appropriate skills to meet the needs of pupils with a range of special education needs (SEN) and disabilities? How is your Disability Equality Scheme reviewed, updated and shared with staff and parents? How does the school monitor the effectiveness of provision for and teaching of pupils with a range of SEN?

16 Getting Started on the IDP Discuss……. Is IDP linked to any of your schools current priorities? Your view of staff confidence in supporting young people with BESD Recent and planned CPD Possible links with other schools/ settings

17 17 THE INCLUSION DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (IDP) Supporting pupils with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties Meet the Characters

18

19

20 20 Characters Four practitioners supported by two experienced practitioners: Alan and Barbara Mandeep, Teacher in a primary school who teaches Leanne (Year 4) Zoe, English teacher in a secondary school who teaches Josh (Year 8) Beth, Teaching assistant in a primary school who works closely with Daniel (Year 6) Steve, Geography teacher in a secondary school who teaches Wayne (Year 10)

21

22 22 Structure of the course What are BESD? 1. How do BESD develop? 2. How can I improve provision for pupils with BESD in the classroom? 3. How can I support individual pupils with BESD more effectively? 4. What are the other sources of support?

23 23 Module 1. How do BESD develop? In this module… Mandeep teaches Leanne and asks the question How do BESD develop? Key areas addressed Mental health Other SEN Attachment and development

24 Risk and Resilience

25 The Marine Navigation metaphor

26 Self-harming behaviours behaviour is the tip of the iceberg

27 BESD and other SEN Speech, language and communication Autism (Aspergers) ADHD General and specific learning difficulties Executive functioning

28 28 Summary of Key messages in Module 1. How do BESD develop? BESD has many antecedents: - social - emotional - cognitive - physical Early childhood experience is a major factor in the development of BESD There is a strong correlation between other SEN and BESD Mental health problems often contribute to BESD

29 29 Module 2. How can I improve provision in the classroom for pupils with BESD? How can I make better provision for pupils with BESD? Key areas addressed Quality first teaching SEAL Classroom environment Zoe teaches Josh and asks the question

30 30 Classroom practice and quality first teaching: key questions for schools Is there a framework for the preparation, delivery and monitoring of quality first teaching? Are high expectations and positive relationships at the heart of classroom practice? Is there a common framework for supporting and reinforcing good behaviour in the classroom? Do staff feel confident to meet the needs of a range of pupils with SEN in their classrooms, including BESD? Are resources and approaches which support pupils with SEN such as the Inclusion Development Programme actively promoted through school development groups ?

31 31 Summary of Key Messages in Module 2. How can I improve provision in the classroom for pupils with BESD? Many pupils need explicit teaching to develop their social and emotional skills Positive relationships are key to promoting the well-being of pupils with BESD Consider the classroom environment and be mindful of how this can affect behaviour Quality first teaching which is personalised to take account of pupils with BESD is crucial Pupils with BESD are often more comfortable once routines are established

32 32 Module 3. How can I support individual pupils with BESD more effectively? How can I support individual pupils with BESD more effectively? Key areas addressed The curriculum The role of the SENCO Managing emotions Beth works closely with Daniel and asks the question

33 33 Triggers to an emotional outburst Individual – what is a trigger for one person may not be for another Context dependent – the straw that breaks the camels back Thresholds vary – an emotional regulation thermostat is set to a default setting during the pre-school years. Adults also get triggered!

34 34 Thoughts FeelingsBehaviour Physiology

35 35 The emotional cycle

36 36 Appropriate group and differentiated task But Daniel is: becoming quieter banging his pencil on the table digging his elbows into his neighbour An everyday scenario...

37 37 Teaching emotional regulation Time out systems A safe place to go (to cool off) Emotional regulation games (Theraplay) Mentoring approaches Cognitive-behavioural programmes

38 38 Relationships To work successfully with children and young people we need good relationships AND appropriate interventions – neither can be sufficient on their own. What we say and how we say it are crucial to both these areas. We need to strive to separate out disapproval of a behaviour from a childs perceiving that we disapprove of them. Cue Alan...

39 39 Whole school approaches Catering for an individuals needs within the classroom is part of Wave 1 provision. Ensuring that there is adequate monitoring and additional provision requires a well-coordinated whole school approach. Behaviour system SENCO Child protection and safeguarding Professional support A Reminder …

40 Individual interventions (with appropriately trained staff): Key questions for Schools Does your provision map demonstrate clearly how pupils with BESD are supported through Waves 1, 2 & 3? Is your partnership work with a range of professionals aligned in a strategic way so that staff have professional support and training on an ongoing basis to meet the range of needs of pupils with SEN including BESD? Is the organisation sufficiently flexible to allow staff to gain additional qualifications, become reflective practitioners and coach each other to higher levels of performance in order to improve outcomes for pupils with SEN including those with BESD?

41 Summary of Key Messages in Module 3. How can I support individual pupils with BESD more effectively? Have strategies for managing emotional outbursts Build positive relationships with pupils Consider use choice of words and tone of voice Think about the role of a key person Understand the provision that is in place Think about unstructured times Be aware of anxiety caused by transitions

42 42 Module 4. What are the other sources of support? What are the other sources of support? Key areas addressed PSPs and the CAF Partnerships with parents Working with other partners Steve teaches Wayne and asks the question… PSPs – pastoral support programme; CAF – the Common Assessment Framework;

43 43 Summary of Key messages in Module 4. What are the other sources of support? You can contribute to and gain support for a pupil with BESD through a thoughtfully designed Pastoral Support programme (PSP) A pupil with complex needs will be receiving support from a range of professionals: consider how these programmes can be built upon in the classroom Engaging with the parents and carers of pupils with BESD to gain their support is crucial and can be extremely valuable There are many creative strategies which have been successfully adopted to engage with hard to reach families.

44 Initial Considerations Staff Self Evaluation, Analysis Action Planning –Look at modules and prioritise which to focus on –Decide how to deliver Tracking, assessment and monitoring pupil progress Monitoring Impact A possible approach See Flow Chart Planning for Implementation in your school

45 Resources Implementation Action plans for school DVD Contains –All resources from today for you to use/ adapt –Further resources for staff


Download ppt "1 THE INCLUSION DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (IDP) Supporting pupils with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google