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Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Milk 21 gallons Poultry 85.4 pounds Rice 20.5 pounds Cheese 32.7 pounds Eggs 245.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Milk 21 gallons Poultry 85.4 pounds Rice 20.5 pounds Cheese 32.7 pounds Eggs 245."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Milk 21 gallons Poultry 85.4 pounds Rice 20.5 pounds Cheese 32.7 pounds Eggs 245 eggs Red Meats pounds Fresh Fruits pounds Flour & Cereal Products pounds Fresh Vegetables pounds Fats & Oils 86.7 pounds Whats on Americas Dinner Table (Yearly)?

3 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Of the 10 percent of disposable income Americans spend on food each year, 58 percent is for food eaten at home and 42 percent is for food eaten away from home. Who Pays the Least for Food? U.S. figure is for food consumed at home and away from home. Figures for all other countries are for food consumed at home. As food consumed at home is less expensive, the gap between these countries and the U.S. would be even greater if food consumed away from home was added.

4 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts How Many People Does One Farmer Feed?

5 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts 3.5¢ Depreciation 4¢ Rent 2.5¢ Interest 1.5¢ Repairs 3.5¢ Business Taxes 3.5¢ Other Costs 4¢ Advertising 4.5¢ Profits 3.5¢ Energy 4¢ Transportation 8¢ Packaging 38.5¢ Off Farm Labor Where Does Your Food Dollar Go? 19¢ FARM81¢ OFF-FARM

6 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Cents (fraction of a dollar shown in %) Grocery ItemPrice Off-Farm Labor 39¢(.39) Packaging 8.5¢ (.085) Transport- ation 4¢ (.04) Energy 3.5¢ (.035) Profit 4¢ (.04) Advertis- ing 4¢ (.04) Depre. 3.5¢ (.035) Rent 4¢ (.04) Interest 2.5¢ (.025) Repairs 1.5¢ (.015) Taxes 3.5¢ (.035) Other 2¢ (.02) Farm 20¢ (.20) Eggs Bread Milk Where does the food dollar go? The farmer gets $.25 for a DOZEN eggs. For this he must raise chicks until they become hens, feed and care for them, they lay about an egg a day. He must gather and clean each egg and bring it to the market where it is sold. All for about 2 pennies per egg.

7 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts How Many Farms and Farmers? A farmer is defined as a person who operates a farm, either doing the work or making day-to-day decisions about such things as planting, harvesting, feeding and marketing. The average farmer is 57 years old.

8 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Grains Hay and Silage Oilseeds Dairy Products Cotton, Tobacco, Sugarbeets, Sugarcane 43.2 Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Coffee, Ginger Root, Hops & Flavorings 43.1 Poultry 26.6 Beef and Veal 23.3 Pork 11.3 Eggs 4.1 Legumes Horticulture, Vegetables, Citrus, Non-Citrus, Fruits & Nuts Graph numbers represent billions of pounds What is Produced on Americas Farms & Ranches? Total Annual Production: 2,207,504,580,000 pounds 122.3

9 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts How Do Farmers and Ranchers Care for Animals? Americas farmers and ranchers care deeply about the health and well-being of their animals. They care because their job is to provide healthy food for consumers, including their own families. Farmers and ranchers take steps to ensure that their animals receive the best possible care – seven days a week, 52 weeks a year. This includes food, water and shelter, in addition to protection from disease, injury and predators.

10 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Animal Care Quick Facts Beef Cattle Supplemental nourishment such as hay or grain is available in winter and during droughts when cattle on pasture would otherwise not have enough food. Through participation in Beef Quality Assurance programs, beef producers demonstrate concern for animal well-being and a commitment to food safety and quality. Dairy Cattle Cows are checked for health and wellness at least twice a day during milking. More than 3.5 million tests conducted each year ensure milk supplies are wholesome and safe. Hogs Each sow (mother pig) is monitored during birth to ensure her safety and that of the piglets. More than 10,000 U.S. pork producers adhere to Pork Quality Assurance Plus practices for improved animal and herd health management. Poultry Indoor facilities are cleaned between flocks and throughout the year. Producers who together care for more than 200 million egg-laying hens participate in the United Egg Producers Certified program. This assures eggs originate from farms that follow responsible, science-based production methods. Horses Veterinary specialists routinely check horses mouths for healthy gums and teeth, sometimes doing extractions and dental surgery. It costs about $2,300 annually to feed and shelter one horse (not including routine veterinary services or hoof care). Horses on ranches are often used for herding, which reduces stress on cattle.

11 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts How Do Farmers Protect the Environment?

12 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Millions of Acres Today Conservation Tillage Conservation tillage is any one of several farming methods that reduces erosion (soil loss) on cropland and uses less energy while maintaining yields and quality. It also improves water quality. This method of producing crops provides for seed germination, plant growth and weed control, while maintaining effective ground cover throughout the year and disturbing the soil as little as possible. For the past decade, some form of conservation tillage has been used on MILLION acres of the total U.S. acres farmed.

13 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts In 2008: $94.8 billion Food Assistance and Nutrition Programs $55.5 Food Safety and Marketing & Inspection $2.3 Conservation Programs $5.0 Research, Education & Economics $2.7 Forest Service $6.2 Foreign Ag Service $2.2 Rural Development $3.0 Farm Programs $13.0 Risk Management $4.5 (in billions) What is USDAs Budget? (USDA = United States Department of Agriculture.) U. S. farms historically cost each American just pennies per meal. Farm programs accounted for slightly less than one-half of one percent of the total U.S. budget.

14 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts 810 pounds of Cotton 2,694 pounds of Wheat 11,500 pounds of Sweet Corn 39,500 pounds of Potatoes 31,000 pounds of Oranges 35,600 pounds of Lettuce 46,500 pounds of Strawberries What Does One Acre of Land Produce? An Acre is About the Size of a Football Field

15 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Who Imports U.S. Farm Products? In 2008, $115.5 billion worth of American agricultural products were exported around the globe. The Top 5 countries (shown below in red) accounted for more than 50 percent of all exports. Canada and Mexico are the two largest trading partners of the U.S. Together, they account for nearly one-third of all U.S. agricultural exports.

16 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts What is the U.S. Share of World Production? Soybeans 33% Corn 41.9% Eggs 8.5% Beef and Veal 20.6% Cotton 15.9% Milk 17% Wheat 9.2%

17 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts U.S. Ag Exports = $115 billion Top Exports (billions) What Do We Export to the World Market?

18 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Top Imports (billions) U.S. Ag Imports = $79 billion What Do We Import in the World Market? The United States sells more food and fiber to world markets than we import, creating a positive agricultural trade balance. Agriculture is one of the few U.S. industries with a positive trade balance. When we move more commodities into additional markets, both commodity prices and farm incomes tend to rise.

19 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Where Does Biotechnology Fit?

20 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Where Does Biotechnology Fit?

21 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Where Does Biotechnology Fit?

22 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Renewable bio-based fuels –Ethanol –Biodiesel How Will We Fuel America? Americas farm fields dont just produce fuel for our bodies. Crops such as corn and soybeans are used to produce fuel for our vehicles. Renewable fuels contribute to a cleaner environment, reduce pollution and reliance on foreign oil and contribute to the stability of the rural farm economy by creating another commercial market for crops. More then 800 filling stations make biodiesel available to the public and 1,700 petroleum distributors carry it nationwide. About 90% of biodiesel is produced from soybean oil.

23 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Historic U.S. Fuel Ethanol Production With a record production of 10 billion gallons of ethanol in 2008, about 3 billion bushels of corn were used to produce fuel for our vehicles. One in every four rows of corn went into ethanol production in Cellulosic ethanol derived from grasses and agricultural waste, rather than corn, also offers great potential as a renewable energy source. Corn/starch-related ethanol production is projected to reach 15 billion gallons in the future.

24 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Food Fish - $672,377,000 Mollusks - $203,183,000 Miscellaneous Fish- $56,381,000 Crustaceans - $53,381,000 Ornamental Fish - $51,297,000 Bait Fish - $38,018,000 Sport Fish - $18,126,000 Comparing U.S. aquaculture products (In sales of $1,000): What About Aquaculture?

25 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Aquaculture is Part of U.S. Agriculture Top Five Aquaculture States in Sales Mississippi Arkansas Alabama Louisiana Florida 4,028 in Total Louisiana – 873 Mississippi – 403 Florida – 359 Alabama – 215 Arkansas – 211 Number of Aquaculture Farms

26 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Forest products industry 11 percent Federal, state and local governments 37 percent Private citizens 52 percent Who Owns Americas Forests? Silviculture is a branch of forestry dealing with the management and cultivation of forest trees. The amount of U.S. forestland has increased by 12 million acres in the last 20 years. About 1/3 of the U.S.or 750 million acres– is covered with trees. The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 MILLION acres of forestland…145 million acres or 75 percent of this natural resource is set aside for non-commercial uses including wildlife habitat and recreational activities.

27 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts 35 gallons of water 20 pounds of grain and concentrated feed 35 pounds of hay or silage What Does a Dairy Cow Consume in a Day? A typical cow weighs 1,500 pounds and produces 70 pounds of milk per day. A cow converts roughage and grains not consumed by people into high-energy foods.

28 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts One Days Production 3.3 pounds of butter OR 8.1 gallons of milk OR 7.0 pounds of cheese VALUE of a cows daily production = $11.55 COST Feed= $4.50 Supplies= $3.00 Bldgs./overhead= $3.75 ______________________ Daily Costs= $11.25 RETURN on Labor= $0.30 What Does a Dairy Cow Produce in a Day? A typical cow produces 70 pounds of milk per day.

29 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Your favorite pizza originates on Americas farms and ranches. Each year, Americans consume nearly 3 billion pizzas. Looking at it another way, that means each person eats about 23 pounds of pizza every year. In fact, 350 slices of pizza are eaten every second! Top-Producing States: Mozzarella Cheese (Dairy Products) California, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania Tomato Sauce (Fresh Tomatoes) California, Florida, Virginia Pizza Dough (Winter Wheat) Kansas, Oklahoma, South Dakota Sausage (From Hogs) Iowa, North Carolina, Minnesota Spinach California, Arizona Mushrooms Pennsylvania, California Onions Georgia, California, Texas Green Peppers California, Florida Pineapple Hawaii Where Does Pizza Come From?

30 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Personal Care Products Shampoo, soap, cosmetics, lotions, fingernail polish, toothpaste Construction Lumber, paints, brushes, tar paper, drywall, tool handles, particle board Printing Paper, ink, film Health Care Pharmaceuticals, surgical sutures, ointments, latex gloves, x-ray film Sports Uniforms, baseball bats, leather equipment and balls, shoes Manufacturing Adhesives, lubricants, solvents, detergents, polymers Entertainment Film, strings for musical instruments Education Crayons, text books, chalk, desks, pencils, paper Transportation Biofuels including ethanol and biodiesel, lubricants, antifreeze, tires, upholstery, packing materials How Are You Connected to agriculture?

31 Copyright © 2009 American Farm Bureau Federation ® Food & Farm Facts Farm Bureau Is … With more than 6.2 million member families, our organization represents a diverse range of agricultural producers and supporters from all 50 states and Puerto Rico. Our grassroots structure ensures that active farmers and ranchers are the people who propose and determine the goals of Farm Bureau at the county, state and national levels. People have the right and the responsibility to speak for themselves. Active, involved Farm Bureau volunteers recognize the necessity and accept the obligation to stand up and speak out for agriculture. They are the foundation of our organization. FARM FACTS is produced by the AMERICAN FARM BUREAU FEDERATION® PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT 600 Maryland Ave., SW · Suite 1000W · Washington, DC Editor: CYNDIE SHEARING SIREKIS · Graphic Design Director: MARY BURNS · Research Librarian: SUE SCHULTZ Order FARM FACTS books, lesson plans, CD-ROM version and more online at: or AE-FFPP CREDITS


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