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Language of Art Symbol: something that stands for, or represents something else. In the spoken language, symbols are words. In the written word, letters.

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Presentation on theme: "Language of Art Symbol: something that stands for, or represents something else. In the spoken language, symbols are words. In the written word, letters."— Presentation transcript:

1 Language of Art Symbol: something that stands for, or represents something else. In the spoken language, symbols are words. In the written word, letters are the symbols. The basic symbols in the language of art are known as the elements of art.

2 Elements of Art: The building blocks or tools the artist has to work with to express ideas: Line Shape Form Value Texture Space Color Principles of Art: The rules or various ways the artist can use each of the elements. Balance Emphasis Harmony (Unity) Variety Movement Rhythm Proportion Pattern The Visual Vocabulary

3 Line & Movement Vincent van Gogh, A Sidewalk Café at Night, Arles Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, The Mill Value & Harmony

4 Henri Matisse, Purple Robe and Anemones Shape & Pattern Form & Balance Henry Moore, Reclining figure, arch leg

5 Texture & Emphasis Robert Goings, Tux Color & Rhythm Robert Cottingham, Roxy

6 Space & Proportion Giovanni Antonio Canal (Canaletto), The Rialto Bridge

7 Janet Fish. Raspberries and Goldfish. Oil on canvas. 72 x 64. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York. Purchase. The Cape Branch Foundation and Lila Acheson Wallace Gifts, 1983. Shape: round bowl Color: yellow curtain Texture: bumpy raspberries shiny glass vase Line: decoration around the vase Form: (implied) 3-dimensional bowls Space: overlapping objects Value: light yellow plate against dark cloth

8 Janet Fish. Raspberries and Goldfish. Oil on canvas. 72 x 64. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York. Purchase. The Cape Branch Foundation and Lila Acheson Wallace Gifts, 1983. Balance: asymmetrical composition Variety: different colors Harmony: similar shapes Movement: overlapping shapes diagonal placement Rhythm: repetition of flowers (static) repetition and placement of shapes Proportion: sizes of objects Pattern: dots on fabric of curtain Emphasis: contrasting textures and colors between raspberries and bowl.

9 Art Criticism: Learning from a Work of Art: Art critics describe their responses to various forms of art, and give their assessment of the merits of the works. Criteria: standards of judgment. Aesthetics: the philosophy or study of the nature and value of art Art Criticism: an organized approach for studying a work of art. Aesthetic experience: Your personal interaction with a work of art.

10 Why study art criticism? Four step process: Description Analysis Interpretation Judgment. 1. DESCRIPTION Literal qualities: realistic presentation of subject matter, and the elements of art found in the work. Henri Rousseau. The Sleeping Gypsy. 1877. 51 x 79. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, new York 1.Sketch work and note credit line 2.List literal qualities (what you see in the work) 3.List the elements of art and how they were used

11 Henri Rousseau. The Sleeping Gypsy. 1877. 51 x 79. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York 2. Analysis Design qualities: How the principles of art are used to organize the elements of art. A design chart will help with this step in art criticism.

12 Henri Rousseau. The Sleeping Gypsy. 1877. 51 x 79. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York 3. Interpretation Expressive qualities: the meaning, mood, or idea communicated to the viewer. Refer to all you have learned from the work during the description and analysis steps. Remember, interpretations will vary among viewers.

13 Henri Rousseau. The Sleeping Gypsy. 1877. 51 x 79. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York 4.Judgment: determines the degree of artistic merit Use aesthetics to help decide: A.Do you like the work? Why or why not? Back up your decision. B.Is the work successful? Why or why not? Back up your decision.

14 1. Imitationalsim: focuses on realistic representations, the literal qualities. Hughie Lee-Smith. The Piper. 1953. 22 x 35 ¼. Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan. Three Theories of Art

15 2. Formalism: places emphasis on the formal qualities, the arrangements of the elements of art using the principles of art. Georgia OKeeffe. Cows Skull: Red, White, and Blue. 1931. Oil on canvas. 39 7/8 x 35 7/8. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

16 3. Emotionalism: Requires that a work of art must arouse a response of feelings, moods, or emotions in the viewer. Art works may use all three aesthetic qualities, but one is usually dominant. When critiquing an art work you must note what theory is dominant in a work and why. Kathe Kollwitz. The Survivors. 23 1/8 x 27 3/8Lithograph. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

17 Theories of Art Imitationalism : The literal or realistic qualities: focuses on the realistic of lifelike representation of subject matter Emotionalism: The expressive qualities: means that the drawing effectively communicates an idea, feeling or mood to the viewer Formalism: The design qualities: refers to the way the elements and principles of art have been used Norman Rockwell, The Roadblock Piet Mondrian, Broadway Boogie Woogie Edward Munch, The Scream

18 Chrysanthemum, 1908–09. Charcoal on paper, 10 x 11 1/4 inches. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Piet Mondrian. Broadway Boogie-Woogie. 1942-43. Oil on canvas, 50 x 50"(127x127 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York Compare these two works: How do the titles describe the art work? These are created by the same artist. Why do you think his work changed so drastically over the years? Which work do you prefer and why? Internet homework: Research three Mondrian works from three different styles throughout his life.

19 Janet Fish. Two Jars Hot Pepper Pickles. Henri Matisse. Goldfish. 1911 Janet Fish is a Realist artist. She believes her art is more about perception than representation of objects and is very interested in depicting the properties of light through glass. Henri Matisse became the spokesperson for the Fauvists (wild beasts). He wanted to express himself with simple color and shape rather than shading and perspective. Compare the two works and describe the differenced in composition and use of space. Discuss differences in color and texture. Internet: Find two different artists who specialize in the still life genre. Sketch their art and describe each piece. List the artists and all pertinent information of the works.

20 Literacy: Antonio Canal, known as Canaletto (R) and M.C.Escher (L) are both known in the art world for their amazing use of linear perspective. Study the two works below. Why do you believe these are noteworthy works? What impresses you about the works? Use three art terms in describing the works and why these terms relate to the works. ( Must be turned in at the end of the period to receive credit.) Technology: Research each artist. Write three paragraphs. One introducing the artist (a quick bio.), one paragraph explaining the use of the major medium used by the art and how the artist set up or used perspective and the final paragraph critiquing a work. The work and site must be listed. If you cannot print an example of the work mentioned then sketch the work (you need not do both.) Due Monday for to full credit. Five points will be deducted each day thereafter.

21 Two examples of surrealist art. What makes the first example a surrealist work? How does Magrittes work make you feel? What other ways could you make a portrait surreal? Internet: Research three Surrealist artists. Print or sketch an example of artists work and critique the work. Be sure to cite the internet sites and critic each work using at least three elements and three principles of art. Dont just list the terms. Describe how each is used in the work and why you think these elements/principles are important to the work. Include your judgment of the work and defend yourself. # 1: Unknown artist #2 Rene Magritte

22 To the left is a drawing of a fabric covered chair. Describe this work using the following terms: value, contrast, texture, line, movement, form, and space. Where and how are these terms used? Briefly (one or two sentences) tell how this drawing can fit into each Theory of Art (Imitationalism, Formalism and Emotionalism.) Internet: Find one work of Michelangelo Merisi Caravaggio, Kathe Kollwitz, and Christo (and Jean Claude.) Cite each work including title of work, date, medium, size of piece, and place the work is located. Sketch or print each work and explain how the work you chose is similar to this work…. Using art terms!

23 Kathe Kollwitz, Self Portrait,1934. Kathe Kollwitz, Self Portrait, 1934. Lithographic crayon, pen and ink. Describe this work using the following terms: value, contrast, texture and form. What parts of the composition focuses on these terms? Of the Theories of Art (Imitationalism, Emotionalism, Formalism), in which one does this most strongly fit into? Why? Does it work in any other? Why? Internet: Find another work by Kathe Kollwitz. Discuss characteristics that she often repeated and why. Cite the work including title of work, date, medium, size of piece, and place the work is located. Sketch or print the work and explain how the work you chose is similar to this work…. Using art terms! Due Monday.

24 Carol Boucher, Blue Ribbon, 39 x 49, 2006. Compare these three landscapes using the following terms: perspective, color, value, contrast, texture and movement. What parts of the composition focuses on these terms? Of the Theories of Art (Imitationalism, Emotionalism, Formalism), in which one does this most strongly fit into? Why? Does it work in any other? Why? Internet: Find another work by one of the three artists. Discuss characteristics that the artist often repeated and why. Cite the work including title of work, date, medium, size of piece, and place the work is located. Sketch or print the work and explain how the work you chose is similar to the posted work…. Using art terms! Bob Crane Jane Aukshunas, Poplar with Shadows, 21 x 27,

25 Robert Rivera Columbian Artist Here are two examples of masks designed to hang. Describe two pieces using the following terms: line, pattern, texture, movement, shape and color. How are these terms relevant to the description of these pieces. Which piece is your favorite? Why? How would you change one to improve its impact on the viewer? How does the functionality of masks effect the design? Internet: Find two works of mask sculptures one emphasizing color and the other design. Sketch or print each work and explain how the work you chose is similar to these work and how they are different, using art terms!

26 Willem de Kooning American, 1904-1997 Gotham News, 1955 oil on canvas, 69 x 79" Gift of Seymour H. Knox, 1955 Willem de Kooning was one of the major practitioners of a movement that developed in New York in the late-1940s and 1950sAbstract Expressionism. Abstract, in that it does not look like the real world, and expressionist, because emotional and subjective aspects are more important than objective and formal concerns. Abstract Expressionism developed partially as a response to the end of World War II. With the dropping of the atomic bomb in Japan, people came to realize that humankind could destroy the world if they were foolish enough to do so. After the war, the United States was introspective, and artists felt that this mood could not successfully be expressed through traditional painting techniques and subject matter. Instead, they looked inside themselves, using lines and colors to express feelings. How does this work compare to … by…? Note the similarities and differences. Describe De Koonings work using art terms. Internet: Research one artist who is know for his/her abstract expressionism style. Write all pertinent information (example left.) Critique the work and explain the art theory used in the work.

27 Vincent Van Gogh, Old Man With His Head In His Hands, 1882.


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