Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Industrialism, Urbanization, Immigration, Progressivism Standard 5 (c)

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Industrialism, Urbanization, Immigration, Progressivism Standard 5 (c)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Industrialism, Urbanization, Immigration, Progressivism Standard 5 (c)

2

3 USHC-5.4 Analyze the rise of the labor movement, including the composition of the workforce of the country in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, and skills; working conditions for men, women, and children; and union protests and strikes and the governments reactions to these forms of unrest. It was not until the progressive President Theodore Roosevelt began to support the right of workers to bargain collectively that unions began to get some government recognition. It was not until the New Deal that the unions right to organize workers was recognized in the law.

4 USHC-5.4 Analyze the rise of the labor movement, including the composition of the workforce of the country in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, and skills; working conditions for men, women, and children; and union protests and strikes and the governments reactions to these forms of unrest. By the end of the 19th century unions were not successful in changing the abuses of the workplace. This was due to public perception of them as dangerous and to government support of the interests of Big Business.

5 Urbanization USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest.

6 Cities developed as a result of –geographic factors first as centers of trade, –then as transportation hubs and finally, –with the advent of electricity, as centers of industrial production in the 19th century.

7 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. They were affected by technological innovations such as the –elevator, –steel girders, –suspension bridges, –electric trolley cars, –els and –subways –These allowed cities to grow both skyward and outward. Cities grew as people immigrated from abroad and migrated from the farm to the city.

8 Building the New York Subway

9 Elevated Train

10

11 Electrical Trolley

12 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. Although most freedmen stayed in the South immediately after the Civil War, African- American migration from the South intensified as a result of: –poor cotton yields due to soil exhaustion and the boll weevil, –discrimination of Jim Crow laws, –intimidation –lynchings of African Americans in the South. As farm prices fell, African Americans joined other farmers in the move to the cities for job opportunities.

13 The Great Migration

14

15

16

17

18 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. This movement to the cities intensified during World War I as more jobs became available. –Farm technology played a role as farmers in all regions: produced more and sold it for less, defaulted on loans, lost their land and moved to the cities to find work. –Others were attracted to the city because of its rich cultural life and excitement. Despite the phenomenal growth of cities, the majority of the American people still lived outside of urban areas before 1920.

19 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. Crowded city conditions led to problems with –housing, –sanitation, –transportation, –water, –Crime, –fire. Corrupt city bosses using the political power of their immigrant constituencies were unable to successfully address all of these problems because of corruption.

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27 Great Chicago Fire

28

29 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. The progressive movement developed as a result of the need to address urban problems and corruption. –The resulting city planning included parks and majestic buildings designed to awe residents and influence their behavior. – Progressive changes in city government made it more professional and more responsive to the needs of the people.

30 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. The womens suffrage movement intensified in the late 19th century. –Women had the opportunity for higher education at new womens colleges and new opportunities in factories and offices. –However, it was the movement west that had the greater impact on gaining the right of women to vote. The first state to grant women suffrage was Wyoming and western states generally allowed women to vote before eastern states did.

31

32

33 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. –Middle class women were increasingly frustrated by their inability to have political influence in solving the problems of city life and the workplace. African-American women formed the National Association of Colored Women to secure the civil rights of African-Americans which included womens suffrage. In 1890, women formed the National American Womens Suffrage Association to lobby for the vote.

34 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. A split over tactics disrupted the movement as some women lobbied state legislatures and others targeted the national government by supporting a national amendment to the Constitution. Women campaigned on the idea that they would clean up society and government. –They were opposed by the liquor industry and political bosses.

35 USHC-5.5 Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the continuation of the womens suffrage movement, and the migration of African Americans to the North and the Midwest. More radical women organized picket lines and hunger strikes. The 19 th Amendment was passed in 1920 in part as a result of this activism and of the contribution women made to the war effort.

36 Immigration USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines.

37 Many immigrants were too poor to move beyond the port cities where they landed. –Thus ethnic neighborhoods grew as immigrants looked for the familiar in a strange new land. –Churches, schools, businesses and newspapers reflected the ethnicity of Little Italy, Greektown or Polonia.

38 Little Italy 1908 Chinatown

39 USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines. Many established immigrants helped those who had newly arrived to find jobs and housing. This had a powerful impact on city politics. –People voted for those who found them jobs and helped them through hard times. –Immigrants gave their votes to neighborhood and ward bosses in gratitude for the help they had received, not as a result of any direct bribery.

40 USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines. Although many political bosses were corrupt and routinely used graft and bribery in awarding city contracts, they also served an important role in helping new immigrants to adapt to their new country. –The power that immigrant groups gave to the urban political machine allowed the bosses to solve important urban problems despite the abuses that occurred under city bosses such as New Yorks Boss Tweed.

41

42

43

44 USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines. Restrictions on immigration were the result of ethnic prejudices and market forces. –Nativism, which predated the Civil War with prejudices against the Germans and the Irish. –After the Civil War, westerners resented the Chinese workers who had built the railroads and Chinese immigration was restricted as a result of such prejudices.

45 USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines. –Unskilled workers objected to the practice of contracting laborers in Europe who would come to take jobs from native Americans and exert a downward pressure on wages. The United States government passed a law which limited this practice. Union members also resented the immigrants who were employed as scabs (strikebreakers) by management.

46 USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines. In the late 19th century, resentments focused on the immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe as the numbers of these groups grew and the differences with previous immigrant groups, (such as the English, Irish and Germans) and native Americans were more obvious. Although further restrictions on immigration were proposed in Congress in the 1890s, they did not pass until the 1920s. Late 19th century nativism can be seen as another expression of Social Darwinism.

47 USHC-5.6 Explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted, including the growth of cities and urban ethnic neighborhoods, the restrictions on immigration that were imposed, and the immigrants responses to the urban political machines. Reformers, such as Jane Addams, served the immigrant population through the establishment of settlement houses, such as Hull House, to aid the immigrants in their assimilation into American culture.


Download ppt "Industrialism, Urbanization, Immigration, Progressivism Standard 5 (c)"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google