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Changing the Conversation 3/28/20141. What Do We Hear? underperforming Too many schools are underperforming. underperforming Too many students are underperforming.

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Presentation on theme: "Changing the Conversation 3/28/20141. What Do We Hear? underperforming Too many schools are underperforming. underperforming Too many students are underperforming."— Presentation transcript:

1 Changing the Conversation 3/28/20141

2 What Do We Hear? underperforming Too many schools are underperforming. underperforming Too many students are underperforming. unprepared Too many students are unprepared for school. skip school Too many students skip school. poor attendance Too many students have poor attendance. bored Too many students are bored with school. dropout rate The dropout rate is too high. suspension rate The suspension rate is too high. 3/28/20142

3 What We Are Doing? Increasing Increasing academic standards QCC GPS Common Core Increasing Increasing academic rigor Increasing Increasing accountability Developing Developing strategic plans Developing Developing school improvement plans Developing Developing pathways to college and careers Encouraging Encouraging innovation 3/28/20143

4 4 Are We Missing Something? Who Are We Missing? Are We Missing Something? Maybe The Correct Question is: Who Are We Missing?

5 Who Are We Missing? 3/28/20145

6 Who Are We Missing? 180, % *Excused and Unexcused Research shows that the negative affect of excused and unexcused absences is similar.

7 Who Are We Missing? 3/28/ % Absent

8 Student Attendance and Graduation 3/28/20148

9 9 26%

10 10 26%

11 3/28/ %

12 Student Attendance and Academic Achievement 3/28/201412

13 3/28/ What would happen if student attendance improved?

14 3/28/ Grade LevelAdditional Number of Students That Would Pass CRCT Grade 3+1,330 Grade 4+1,357 Grade 5+1,220 Grade 6+2,533 Grade 7+2,697 Grade Total (3-8)+10,129

15 3/28/ Grade LevelAdditional Number of Students That Would Pass CRCT Grade 3+3,219 Grade 4+2,838 Grade 5+2,867 Grade 6+2,134 Grade 7+2,312 Grade 8+1,897 Total (3-8)+15,267

16 3/28/ Grade LevelAdditional Number of Students That Would Pass CRCT Grade 3+5,737 Grade 4+5,979 Grade 5+3,075 Grade 6+8,440 Grade 7+4,994 Grade 8+3,602 Total (3-8)+31,827

17 3/28/ Grade LevelAdditional Number of Students That Would Pass CRCT Totals Reading+10,129 ELA+15,267 Math+31,827 Changing the Conversation

18 3/28/ Myths about student attendance

19 Myths About Student Attendance 1.Missing a few days of school each year is normal and doesnt matter that much. 2.We dont need to worry about attendance until middle or high school. 3.Most schools already monitor student absences. 4.Because families are ultimately responsible for children getting to school, theres not much schools can do to improve attendance. 3/28/ Myths about student attendance

20 Myths About Student Attendance 1.Missing a few days of school each year is normal and doesnt matter that much. – Data indicate that missing more than five days of school each year, regardless of the cause, impacts student academic performance and starts shaping attitudes about school. – From the 6 th grade through the 9 th grade, student attendance is a better predictor of dropping out than standardized test scores. – Excused absences and unexcused absences have similar impact on student academic performance. 3/28/201420

21 Myths About Student Attendance 2. We dont need to worry about attendance until middle or high school. – While absenteeism is more widespread in middle and high school, it still affects vast numbers of younger students. – Data shows that standardized test scores are significantly affected by elementary students attendance patterns, to the point that the number of absences is related to the students chances of passing the CRCT (Meets or Exceeds). – Elementary students school attendance habits often carry over into middle and high school. 3/28/201421

22 Myths About Student Attendance 3.Most schools already closely monitor student absences. – Even when teachers take roll daily, the data they collect is not typically analyzed to reveal absence patterns. – Most schools measure school-wide attendance or they track truancy, which does not capture excused absences. – When schools and school districts analyze all absences (unexcused, excused, and suspensions) they are often surprised at how many students are missing 10 days or more each school year. Georgia is ranked 10 th in the nation for out-of-school suspensions Georgia is ranked 10 th in the nation for out-of-school suspensions 3/28/201422

23 Myths About Student Attendance 4.Because families are ultimately responsible for children getting to school, theres not much schools can do to improve attendance. Schools and school districts that have made a concentrated, systemic review of student absences have developed effective strategies. A review of student absences has been used to identify which students are absent (excused and unexcused), to look for patterns and locations and possible related causes (such as school climate factors, environmental factors, health factors, transportation, etc.) 3/28/201423

24 Schools and school districts that conducted close reviews of student absences found that health issues accounted for many absences. 27% of Georgias children between the ages of 10 and 13 are obese. 27% of Georgias children between the ages of 10 and 13 are obese. 10% of Georgias children suffer from asthma (75,000 students missed over 470,000 school days). 10% of Georgias children suffer from asthma (75,000 students missed over 470,000 school days). Dental health issues are the leading cause of health- related school absences. Dental health issues are the leading cause of health- related school absences. 3/28/201424

25 Schools and school districts that reviewed student discipline policies, procedures, and discipline data and subsequently implemented a school-wide school climate improvement strategy (such as Positive Behavior Intervention Supports – PBIS) reduced out-of-school suspensions (absences). Schools and school districts that developed strategies to improve school climate have seen reductions in negative peer interaction issues, such as bullying, that impact student attendance Georgia Student Health Survey found that over 38% of 6 th graders are chronically picked on at school Georgia Student Health Survey found that over 38% of 6 th graders are chronically picked on at school. 25

26 Schools and school districts bring school staff members, parents, students, health and social services and others together to review data, identify issues related to cause and effect, and then develop strategies to improve student attendance. 3/28/ Collect and Analyze Data & Other Information Identify Priorities & Objectives Develop a Plan

27 Changing the Conversation Awareness: Awareness: Student academic performance is related to student attendance. Acceptance Acceptance: Student academic performance is related to student attendance and the effectiveness of educational improvement strategies will be limited unless student attendance improves for all students, not just chronically truant students. Action Action: Schools need to review student attendance data and develop strategies. 3/28/201427

28 3/28/201428

29 3/28/ Whats possible? Keep asking that question until the conversation changes.

30 3/28/ Changing the Conversation Making education work for all Georgians…starts with student attendance. Garry W. McGiboney, Ph.D. Associate Superintendent – Policy Georgia Department of Education


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