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Data and Learning Quality Classroom Ground Rules Mission Statement SMART Goals Data Center Data Folder Student-Led Conferences Class Meetings Quality Tools.

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Presentation on theme: "Data and Learning Quality Classroom Ground Rules Mission Statement SMART Goals Data Center Data Folder Student-Led Conferences Class Meetings Quality Tools."— Presentation transcript:

1 Data and Learning Quality Classroom Ground Rules Mission Statement SMART Goals Data Center Data Folder Student-Led Conferences Class Meetings Quality Tools & PDSA Quality Classroom

2 Deciding to enter into a quality process in education is not because good things are not happening but because of a desire to have good things happen regularly, consistently, and predictable at every level of the school system. Random acts of excellence have little effect on the desired strategic results. ~Margaret Byrnes

3 Essential Questions What do we want students to know or be able to do? How do we know? What evidence do we have of the learning? How do we respond if they struggle or dont learn? How do we respond if they already know it?

4 Student Questions What do I need to know? Where am I now? How do I get there? What happens if I struggle or fail?

5 Assessment – What is it? Can you define it? Force Field Analysis Drivers & Preventors With your group.

6 Types of Assessment Formative In-Process Summative High Stakes Testing What do these terms mean? Discuss with your group.

7 Purpose: Assess to meet whose needs?

8 PURPOSE Two Uses of Assessment SUMMATIVE Assessments OF Learning Assessments OF Learning How much have students learned as of a particular point in time?FORMATIVE Assessments FOR Learning Assessments FOR Learning How can we use assessment information to help students learn more?

9 Assessment for Learning Rick Stiggins

10 Balanced Assessment: Meeting the Needs of All Stakeholders Annual accountability testing Interim, short-cycle or benchmark Ongoing, accurate classroom assessment for learning

11 Overview SummativeFormative Reason To Inform Focus Assessment OF Learning Assessment FOR Learning Check Status Improve Learning Others about students Students about themselves Standards Enabling Targets

12 Key IDEA: Formative assessment can and should be done BY STUDENTS, as well as by teachers. The key to improvement is how students and teachers use assessment information.

13 Assessment and Student Learning Robert J Marzano Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning Rick Stiggins Assessment Training Institute

14 Factors Influencing Achievement 1. Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum 2. Challenging Goals and Effective Feedback 3. Parent and Community Involvement 4. Safe and Orderly Environment 5. Collegiality and Professionalism 6. Instructional Strategies 7. Classroom Management 8. Classroom Curriculum Design School Teacher Student 9. Home Environment 10. Learning Intelligence/ Background Knowledge 11. Motivation Marzano

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16 %ile improvement increase Starting percentile 50th Starting percentile 50th Teacher assessment effectiveness Student Achievement Increase of 34%ile to 84%ile 13%ile increase to 63%ile

17 %ile improvement increase Starting percentile 50th Starting percentile 50th Teacher assessment effectiveness Student Achievement Increase of 49%ile to 99%ile 28%ile increase to 78%ile

18 John Hattiereviewed 7,827 studies on learning and instruction. Conclusion… The most powerful single innovation that enhances achievement is feedback. The simplest prescription for improving education must be dollops of feedback.

19 Like most things in education, classroom assessment enhances student achievement under certain conditions only. Feedback from classroom assessments should provide students with a clear picture of their progress on learning goals and how they might improve Feedback from classroom assessment should encourage students to improve. Classroom assessment should be formative in nature. Formative classroom assessments should be quite frequent.

20 Feedback from classroom assessments should provide students with a clear picture of their progress on learning goals and how they might improve # of studiesCharacteristic of Feedback from Classroom Assessment Percentile Gain/Loss Bangert-Drowns, Kulik, Kulik, & Morgan, Right/wrong-3 39 Provide correct answers Criteria understood by student vs. not understood 16 9 Explain20 4 Student reassessed until correct 20

21 Feedback from classroom assessments should provide students with a clear picture of their progress on learning goals and how they might improve # of studiesCharacteristic of Feedback from Classroom Assessment Percentile Gain/Loss Fuchs & Fuchs Displaying results graphically Evaluation by rule [uniform way of interpreting results of classroom assessments using a tight logic) 32 49Evaluation by rule [uniform way of interpreting results of classroom assessments using a tight logic) 32

22 Identify one grade level (or course) learning goal per quarter or per semester for each of the following subject areas: mathematic, reading, writing, science, and social studies. Construct a rubric, or other type of common scale, for each learning goal. Have teachers formally and informally assess each learning goal at least once every two weeks keeping track of each students score on each learning goal. (Use of appropriate computer software is highly recommended) Have students keep track of their progress on each goal and use the data as the basis for teacher/student interactions about student progress. Periodically (at least, once per quarter) aggregate the data by grade level. Have teachers meet to discuss student progress and how it might be improved

23 could describe what they are learning, not just describe what they are doing focus more on learning goals than on completing assignments personalize the learning goals Not at all To a great extent 1234 How effective am I when I set objectives? When I set objectives, to what extent do I believe that my students

24 Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback 1.Feedback should be corrective in nature. 2.Feedback should be timely. 3.Feedback should be specific to a criterion. 4.Students can effectively provide their own feedback. Generalizations from research on Providing Feedback

25 How do you provide feedback in a way that students Know what they are learning and how well the are progressing Can explain what they need to do to get better.

26 Clean refrigerator 4Entire refrigerator is sparkling and smells clean. All items are fresh, in proper containers (original or Tupperware, with lids), and organized into categories 3Refrigerator is generally wiped clean. All items are relatively fresh, in some type of container (some Tupperware lids are missing or dont fit) and are sitting upright

27 2Some of the shelves are wiped clean, although there are some crusty spots. There are some suspicious smells. Items are in containers, but there seems to be some green stuff growing in some of the Tupperware 1Items stick to the shelves when they are picked up. The smells linger long after the refrigerator door is closed. Several items need to be thrown out Tupperware and all

28 A generic template for rubric design

29 4 3The students responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes (THAT WERE EXPLICITLY TAUGHT) 2 1 0

30 4 3 The students responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 2The students responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 1 0

31 4 3 The students responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 2 The students responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 1The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 0

32 4 3 The students responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 2 The students responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 1 The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 0The student provides little or no response. Even with help the student does not exhibit a partial understanding of the knowledge.

33 4In addition to exhibiting level 3 performance, the students responses demonstrate in- depth inferences and applications that go beyond what was taught in class 3 The students responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 2 The students responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 1 The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 0 The student provides little or no response. Even with help the student does not exhibit a partial understanding of the knowledge.

34 4 In addition to exhibiting level 3 performance, the students responses demonstrate in-depth inferences and applications that go beyond what was taught in class. 3 The students responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 2 The students responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 1 The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 0 The student provides little or no response. Even with help the student does not exhibit a partial understanding of the knowledge.

35 On this writing task, I will be working on, and would like to receive feedback on, _______________________________. In my next writing assignment, I need to work on_____________________.

36 Date__9/17_Date_9/24_Date_10/1_Date_10/20_ Date_10/31_ Date_11/15_Date_______ Date______ My Progress in Writing ProcessContent and Organization Goal Achievement Effort


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